University Archives Finding Aids

A

The University of North Carolina's first art museum, established in 1937, was located in Person Hall and known as the Person Hall Art Gallery. In 1958, a new building was completed with funds from the bequest of William Hayes Ackland. The museum then moved and was renamed the William Hayes Ackland Memorial Art Center; in 1979 its name changed again, to the Ackland Art Museum. The museum was part of the Department of Art, and the department chairman served as its director, until 1974, when the museum became a separate administrative unit. (The bulk of the museum's pre-1974 records are among the Records of the Department of Art).
The Alembic Club was the successor to the Science Club and the Journal Club. The Journal Club was founded on 25 January 1901 by faculty and students of the University of North Carolina Department of Chemistry. Meeting twice monthly from 1901 through 1921, the Journal Club discussed research articles published in scholarly journals. Presentations of members' research work was also encouraged. In 1924, the club was reorganized to include members from all physical science departments on the campus. This new organization was first named the Science Club, then the Alembic Club.
The University of North Carolina (Rho) chapter of the Alpha Chi Sigma collegiate chemistry fraternity began in 1909 as the Order of the Khems. In 1912, the group joined the national Alpha Chi Sigma organization. The group is a professional chemistry fraternity, although it has social functions as well. The national fraternity is divided into collegiate and professional divisions, with the professional members providing guidance and information for the collegiate.
The Beta Chapter of Alpha Epsilon Delta, the national pre-medical fraternity, was established at the University of North Carolina on 30 March 1936. The chapter's goals were to foster the scholastic and social life of prospective medical students. The chapter organized lectures and seminars throughout the academic year. The major event was the annual new members' banquet.
The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) was organized on 1-2 January 1915 in New York, N.Y., to promote the advancement of the standards, ideals, and welfare of the faculty at institutions of higher education. The Association has been most active in the areas of academic freedom and tenure. Thirteen professors at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill organized a chapter of the AAUP in 1916.
The Amphoterothen Society was founded at the University of North Carolina in the 1912-1913 academic year as a student organization to promote extemporaneous speaking. The society was inactive from 1947 to 1952. In 1959, the society was reorganized by the Forensic Council as an honorary society to recognize thirteen students who exemplify the virtues of leadership, oratory, and service.
The Anti-Apartheid Support Group (AASG) was organized and officially recognized as a student organization at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in October 1985. From 1985 to 1987, the AASG led the campus movement against apartheid by insisting on divestiture of all University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill holdings in companies operating in South Africa. Their protests and demonstrations peaked in March and April 1986 when the group erected shanties in front of South Building. The group was dismantled shortly after the the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Endowment Board voted in October 1987 to divest all of its holdings in companies operating in South Africa.
The Archibald D. Murphey Educational Club was formed on 27 October 1913 by members of the University of North Carolina faculty and staff to promote interest in and support for the public schools and teacher-training programs of North Carolina.

B

The Baptist Student Union at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, formerly known as Baptist Campus Ministry, was a student organization located in the Battle House from 1965 to 2015. The records of the Baptist Student Union include scrapbooks and photographs documenting the group's activities, primarily from the 1980s to the 2000s. There are some photographs and one undated scrapbook from the 1950s and 1960s. Records also include meeting agendas and minutes, constitutions, correspondence, newsletters, programs, a history of the Battle House, and administrative records of the organization.
William B. Blythe (1928-2000), an alumnus of the University of North Carolina, was a professor and Chief of Nephrology in the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Publications and presentations relating to UNC-Chapel Hill School of Journalism and Mass Communication faculty member Jane D. Brown's research on adolescent exposure to mass media portrayals of sex, violence, and drugs and alcohol; materials relating to her term, 1994-1997, as Chair of the Faculty Council at UNC-Chapel Hill; photographs, circa 1990s, of Jane D. Brown with members of the Faculty Council, students, and UNC-Chapel Hill administrators; annotated lectures and talks; and biographical materials.
Charles Dale Beers (1901-1976) was a protozoologist and professor of zoology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The collection contains Charles Dale Beers's lecture notes, illustrations, class schedules, and publications from his time at UNC and his time as a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University. Also included are research files on Beers and his wife Alma Holland Beers compiled by UNC-CH Botany Librarian William R. Burk containing correspondence with Beers's relatives, photographs, clippings, and other materials.
Research files on faculty in the Zoology and Biology Departments at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compiled by former Botany Librarian William R. Burk. Burk compiled these files intending to write a book on the faculty's contributions. Instead, he wrote Putting Down Roots: Foundations of Botany at Carolina, 1792-1902, a history of the early teaching of botany at the University.

C

Students at the University of North Carolina established a chapter of the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) in 1860. Although the association initially was run entirely by the students, the university encouraged it and eventually provided it with a building. The YMCA disbanded in 1870 but was reestablished in 1876 and has operated continuously since then. In addition to providing a center for religious life on the campus, the YMCA took the lead in organizing an orientation program for new students, published the student handbook for many years, ran the book exchange, and played an important role in early athletics at the university. From 1926 to 1943, the YMCA sponsored the Institute of Human Relations, which brought speakers of many religious and political persuasions to the university. The institute was disbanded during World War II but was reestablished as the Carolina Symposium in 1956. The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was established on campus in 1936 and began to sponsor programs and events of a similar nature. In 1954, the paid staffs and advisory boards of the YMCA and YWCA were merged; however, the two associations maintained separate student cabinets until 1973. The merged organization was known as the YMCA-YWCA until 1976, when its name changed to Campus Y. The Campus Y has focused increasingly on community service and issues related to social justice and race relations. The director of the Campus Y reports to the vice chancellor for student affairs.
Records of the UNC Cardboard Club primarily contain photographs depicting the Club's displays at Kenan Stadium and during the 1966 Beat Dook Parade. The Cardboard Club coordinated and produced displays at UNC football games, using colored cardboard squares to form words and images in the stands. The collection also contains other materials documenting the Club's activities including cards used to direct participants at football games and grid paper plans for cardboard displays.
The Carolina Association for Medieval Studies was established at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to bring together students studying the European Middle Ages in various academic departments at Carolina and nearby universities. Though officially a student organization, the association welcomes faculty, staff, and others interested in medieval studies as members. In addition to its regular meetings, the association sponsors reading groups, lectures, and social events. It also compiles resource lists and publishes a newsletter.
The Carolina Black Caucus formed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1974. The organization, known as the Black Faculty Staff Caucus (BFSC) prior to the late 2000s, promotes affirmative action, recruitment and hiring of African Americans, racial justice and awareness, and equal opportunities for all minority members of the university community.
This collection consists of the records of The Carolina Center for Public Service, which was established in 1999 to develop and coordinate partnerships between UNC-Chapel Hill and communities throughout North Carolina. These records include promotional publications about the Center, the Buckley Public Service Scholars, the APPLES Service Learning and other programs, and records related to the Tar Heel Bus Tour.
The Carolina Folk Festival was established in December 1947 as an activity of the University of North Carolina's Folklore Council. Bascom Lamar Lunsford, director of the Annual Mountain Dance and Folk Festival in Asheville, N.C., was the moving force in the festival's establishment and organized the first festival, held 18-19 June 1948. Lunsford became director of the Carolina Folk Festival. The records of the Carolina Folk Festival consist of files of Russell Marvin Grumman, director of the university's Extension Division and chairman of the Folklore Council. They detail the establishment of the Carolina Folk Festival and the organization of the annual festivals held from 1948 through 1953.
The Carolina Forum was organized on 1 July 1948 to bring leaders of government, labor, industry, and education, to speak on the University of North Carolina campus. In part, the Carolina Forum took over functions of the Carolina Political Union, which had been organized in 1936 by political science students to bring political leaders to speak on campus and to hold roundtable discussions on current political topics. After the advent of the Carolina Forum, the Carolina Political Union continued to function, but its activity was limited to weekly discussions and occasional speakers. Records include correspondence, 1937-1948, of the Carolina Political Union and, 1948-1959, of the Carolina Forum. The correspondence primarily consists of requests for speakers to come and arrangements for their visits. Also included are dismantled scrapbooks of newspaper clippings on speakers from the 1940s and loose clippings from the 1950s. Some of the 1965-1966 material addresses the Speaker Ban issue.
For many years Chapel Hill's only hotel, the Carolina Inn was built in 1923-1924 by John Sprunt Hill, a trustee and benefactor of the University of North Carolina. Hill operated the Inn as a private business until 1935, when he donated it to the University, which placed it administratively within its Business Organization (later the Division of Business and Finance). Until 1993, the manager of the Inn reported to the officer responsible for auxiliary enterprises. In accordance with Hill's gift, income from the Inn supported the Library's North Carolina Collection. The Inn was renovated in 1939 and 1969-1972. In 1993, the University hired Doubletree Hotels, Inc., of Phoenix, Ariz, to run the Inn, with the University using its share of the profits for library support.
C. Horace Hamilton (1901-1977) was Assistant Director of the Carolina Population Center, 1967-1973.
The Carolina Quarterly, successor to the University Magazine, was established in 1948 as the literary publication of the University of North Carolina Student Government. Originally restricted to publication of student poetry and short stories, it soon broadened its scope to include fiction, poetry, graphic work, and book reviews produced by student and non-student authors. The records include correspondence with contributors, including one letter each from Stephen King and Annie Dillard; contributor contracts and biographies; issue publication records; financial statements; policy and procedure records; sales and marketing materials; and other records of the Carolina Quarterly. With a few exceptions, manuscripts of articles are not included in the records.
For many years, an organization of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students and faculty organized, planned, and supervised the biennial Carolina Symposium on Public Affairs, a week-long program of speeches, panel discussions, seminars, and other activities focusing on a topic of current political, social, economic, or cultural interest. Under the leadership of University President Frank Porter Graham and Dean of Students Francis F. Bradshaw, the Symposium originated in 1927 as the Institute of Human Relations.
The University of North Carolina's Student Union was established in 1931. Its membership included students, university staff, alumni, trustees, and those who had contributed toward the construction of Graham Memorial (named for Edward Kidder Graham), the building that was to house the union until 1968. The Frank Porter Graham Student Union, a larger building, was completed in 1968 and as of 2012 continued to house the Union. While in Graham Memorial, the Student Union was called Graham Memorial Student Union. In 1968, its name became Carolina Union. Defined by the university as a student organization, the union has an activities board, made up of students, which plans and coordinates programs. The activities board, however, is overseen by the union's board of directors and director; the latter is a full-time administrator who reports to the vice chancellor for student affairs.
The Carolina Women's Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was founded in 1997. Through its programs and services, the Center works to represent women and their interests on campus and beyond. The Center focuses on issues of violence prevention; gender, difference and diversity; closing the gender gap, and family advocacy. Records of the Center include materials related to its programs, events, and advocacy; subject files on issues of interest to the Center; committee records and reports, and clippings and publications.
The Center for International Understanding of the University of North Carolina (System) was founded in 1979 through the efforts of North Carolina Governor James B. Hunt and First Lady Carolyn Hunt. It was known initially as the North Carolina Center for International Understanding (NCCIU). After it became affiliated with the national non-profit organization Friendship Force International (FFI), it was known as the Friendship Force of North Carolina. That affiliation ended in 1988. Though headquartered in Raleigh, N.C., the center has been administratively a part of the University of North Carolina (System) since its inception. Its mission has been to educate North Carolina's business, policy, and education leaders about the world and to foster greater global engagement on the part of the state. Its programs have included numerous international exchanges and partnerships. Since 2002, much of the center's activity has focused on building cultural competency among the state's K-12 students.
The Alpha Sigma Chapter of the Chi Psi Fraternity was originally chartered 16 November 1855 and was the first chapter of Chi Psi established in the South. It was active until the Civil War, but at the onset of war, it dissolved. It was re-established as a local fraternity at the University in 1923, but was not re-chartered as a chapter of Chi Psi until 1928. Since that time it has remained one of the most active and respected fraternities on campus. The records of the Alpha Sigma Chapter of the Chi Psi Fraternity consist mainly of correspondence, minutes of annual meetings, chapter publications, and chapter histories.
Speeches, correspondence, and teaching materials of Richard R. Cole, Dean of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1979-2005. Speeches were given from 1988 to 2016 to alumni detailing developments in the then School of Media and Journalism. There are also materials and photographs relating to Richard R. Cole's spring break class trips to Cuba from 1991 to 2016 among other items.
The Cooperative Program in the Humanities was a joint program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University. Created in 1963, it operated until 1971, supported by grants from various foundations. Its chief activity was the awarding of fellowships to humanities faculty at colleges and universities in Virginia and the Carolinas. Selected faculty spent an academic year engaged in study and writing at UNC and/or Duke. The program also sponsored the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, a summer institute that continued for several years after the program ended.

D

In January 1975, David Ernest Duke, a leader in the Ku Klux Klan, spoke at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His speech was disrupted by members of the campus Black Student Movement. Duke's statement about the disruption of his speech appeared in the Daily Tar Heel, the campus student newspaper.
Joseph M. DeSimone (1964- ) is a chemist and inventor with joint appointments to the faculties of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University. The collection consists of student lab notebooks; binders documenting scientific meetings, data and results, grant proposals, site visits, and reports; and videotapes of the classroom and lab of Joseph M. DeSimone and news coverage and publicity about his research and inventions.
On 19 March 1887, the Beta Chapter of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity was reorganized, 21 years after it had been disbanded in 1866.
The Alpha Lambda Chapter of Delta Sigma Pi, an international fraternity of business administration students, was chartered at the University of North Carolina in 1925.
The North Carolina Chapter of Delta Upsilon Fraternity was chartered in April 1953 in response to the Delta Club's application in 1952 for national affiliation. In 1925, 1926, and 1927, Sigma Delta, another local fraternity, had applied to affiliate with Delta Upsilon Fraternity but had been denied each time. North Carolina Delta Upsilon Foundation, incorporated in 1954, owns the chapter house, provides scholarship aid for members, and funds the chapter's educational programs.
The Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies Foundation, Inc., was established on 8 July 1974 as a non-profit corporation. Its object was to preserve, maintain, restore, and enhance those literary, historical, and artistic properties that are entrusted to it by the Dialectic Society and the Philanthropic Society of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Records include meeting minutes and agendas of the foundation's Board of Directors, the corporate charter, bylaws, financial records, and records of its Bicentennial Committee.

E

The Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society was formed on 20 September 1883 under the leadership of Francis P. Venable and University of North Carolina President Kemp P. Battle. Composed of faculty, staff, and alumni of the university's science and mathematics departments, the society was organized to commemorate the name and contributions of Elisha Mitchell by fostering scientific research and disseminating scientific knowledge. The primary means of reaching these ends was the publication of the annual Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. In 1983, publication of the journal passed to the North Carolina Academy of Science and the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society dissolved. Records of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society include administrative files and files of the Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. The administrative files contain material on the routine activities and operation of the society. Included are correspondence of the officers, treasurers' records, minutes of the society's meetings, membership rolls, and other items. The records of the Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society contain material on the organization, content, and finances of the journal, including correspondence with contributors.

F

The Planning Library at the University of North Carolina was established to serve the research needs of students and faculty in the Department of City and Regional Planning, which was founded in 1946. It was administered as a departmental library, with part of its support coming from the department and part from the University Library. The Planning Library was later named in honor of F. Stuart Chapin, Jr., who was a member of the faculty of the Department of City and Regional Planning, 1949-1978. As of 12 July 2010, the F. Stuart Chapin, Jr. Planning Library closed, and its staff and collections were moved to the Walter Royal Davis Library.
The Fraternity of Delta Psi, commonly known as Saint Anthony Hall, established its Xi Chapter at the University of North Carolina in November 1854, making it the second Greek-letter society at the university. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War, two-thirds of the 90 Xi Chapter members entered the Confederate army, effectively making the chapter inactive. By 1867, the chapter had ceased to exist. It was not until 1926 that the Fraternity of Delta Psi was officially re-established at the University of North Carolina, aided by the lobbying efforts of University of Pennsylvania Delta Chapter member Grahame Wood.
Friends of University Network Television (FOUNT) was incorporated on 2 March 1975 as a nonprofit corporation to improve communication between the University of North Carolina Television Network and the citizens of North Carolina. The goal was to increase popular awareness of and support for public television. FOUNT's funding came from membership dues, contributions, and grants from North Carolina charitable foundations. Its activities focused on creation of local chapters, distribution of program preference ballots, publication of program listings and newsletters, and production of telethons. FOUNT was dissolved in 1981, two years after the establishment of the University of North Carolina Center for Public Television, which had gradually assumed the functions of FOUNT. Records of the Friends of University Network Television include minutes and correspondence of the Board of Directors and Executive Committee, correspondence of the president and other officials, financial records, photographs of FOUNT staff and functions, and other items.

G

The Lowell M. Greenlaw Papers include correspondence, research notes, and a manuscript draft that document the research and writing of a biography of Edwin Greenlaw, the older brother of Lowell M. Greenlaw and a former professor of English literature and dean of the Graduate School at the University of North Carolina.

H

The Horace Williams Philosophical Society was organized in June 1943 by professors Francis Bradshaw and C. P. Russell, University of North Carolina Controller Claude Teague, and Dr. Otho B. Ross of Charlotte, N.C. The objectives of the society were to commemorate and publicize the life and work of Henry Horace Williams (1858-1940), noted University of North Carolina professor of philosophy, 1890-1940. The society published works on Williams's life and philosophy of teaching and invited noted philosophers to address its members at annual meetings held during the University of North Carolina commencement week. Records of the Horace Williams Philosophical Society include correspondence, membership lists, minutes of meetings, and financial records.

J

The Janitors' Association was established in 1930 through the efforts of several janitors at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Soon after its establishment, the university required all janitors to join the association. Most of the members were African Americans. The association's stated purpose was to promote cooperation between the janitors and the university administration and to advance the moral standards and ideals of the janitors. Meetings were devoted to the discussion of job-related issues, such as salaries and uniforms, and the planning of social events.
The Botany Library and the Zoology Library were established at the University of North Carolina in the 1930s to support the curricula of the Department of Botany and the Department of Zoology. In 1982, the two departments merged to form the Department of Biology. On 1 July 1988, the John N. Couch Library (botany) and the Zoology Library merged to form the John N. Couch Biology Library, which, in 2010, was absorbed into the Kenan Science Library.

K

The Delta Xi Chapter of Kappa Alpha Theta was active at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1966 to 1992. Founded in 1870 at DePauw University in Greencastle, Ind., Kappa Alpha Theta was the first women's fraternity founded with Greek letters.
Kappa Sigma Fraternity originated at the University of Bologna in Italy in 1400. The first chapter in the United States was founded at the University of Virginia in 1869. The Alpha Mu Chapter was established at the University of North Carolina in 1893. Its founding members were George Roscoe Little, Gerard Samuel Wittson, James Spenser Lewis, Thomas Pleasant Braswell, Jr., and Thomas Menan Hooker. The fraternity stressed fellowship, leadership, scholarship, and service.
Joy S. Kasson is a professor of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She chaired the Department of American Studies from 2001 to 2011. Her research focuses on the cultural history of art and literature.
The Law Library at the University of North Carolina was established around 1902. Since its founding, it has served the legal information needs of the students and faculty of the University's School of Law and of the state's legal community and citizens. The library has had a dedicated librarian/director since 1923 and has been administratively independent of the University Library system since 1955. In 1993, the Law Library was named for Kathrine R. Everett (LL.B. 1920), one of the first women to graduate from the University of North Carolina School of Law. Everett died in 1992, leaving a portion of her estate to the school.
The Kenan Convocation was a gathering of Kenan-endowed professors held every two to three years at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1980 to 1996. It featureed speakers and discussion on a topic determined by its Planning Committee. It was sponsored by the William Rand Kenan, Jr., Charitable Trust, which endows professorships at universities throughout the United States. The first Kenan Convocation was held in 1980; subsequent ones have been held in 1982, 1984, 1986, 1989, 1993, and 1996.

L

The Librarians' Association at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (LAUNC-CH) was organized in 1972 to promote the professional growth and development of its members, effective library service within the academic community, and a spirit of cooperation among members of the library profession. Membership is open to all professional librarians at the university. In addition to regular monthly meetings, September through June, the association holds seminars and workshops on special topics and sponsors two- or three-day conferences. Records of the Librarians' Association include correspondence, minutes of meetings, committee reports, and financial records. Topics of conferences have included library automation, library management, reference, scholarly publishing, serials, preservation, special collections, and roles of librarians. Committees include publicity, program, professional development, and professional welfare. The records of the Committee on Professional Welfare include material on faculty status for librarians and on employment policies for non-tenured professional university staff. Records also include three audiocassette tapes of addresses given at the 1989 Librarians' Association Conference.
Russell Charles Link was a student in the Department of Dramatic Arts at the University of North Carolina in the late 1950s. He acted in or directed several productions on campus during his time at the University. His scrapbook documents Carolina Playmakers productions and events sponsored by Graham Memorial Student Union from 1955 to 1959.

M

The first band at the University of North Carolina was organized in 1903 with Charles T. Woollen as its director. By 1920, the band had become a regular part of football games. By the mid-1960s, there were several bands, including a marching band, concert band, and pep band; and the original band had become known as the Marching Tar Heels. From the 1920s through the mid-1960s, the Department of Music was responsible for the direction of the bands. Responsibility then shifted to the Division of Student Affairs until 1989, when it returned to the Department of Music. As of 2012, the Marching Tar Heels were directed by Jeffrey Fuchs of the Department of Music.
Papers of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health faculty member David Timothy McCoy include reports, meeting minutes, correspondence, and notes relating to his work on the Advisory Committee on Minority Affairs for the Division of Health Affairs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Michael Rogers McVaugh (1938- ) is a professor emeritus in the Department of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Records include talks given by Dr. McVaugh to local and regional groups and at conferences or professional meetings, some published and some unpublished. Topics of talks include the history of extrasensory perception (ESP) and parapsychology, the history of medicine in medieval Spain, the history of medieval surgery, and medieval Arabic-Hebrew-Latin translations of medical texts.

N

The NC Club, predecessor of the Monogram Club, was formed on 28 September 1908 as an organization of athletes who had lettered in their sports. The purpose of the club was the promotion of athletics at the University of North Carolina. Records of the NC Club include reports, 15 March 1909, of committees on football, baseball, track, and tennis; the constitution of the club; and minutes of club meetings, 28 September 1908-13 May 1912.
The North Carolina Botanical Garden Foundation is a nonprofit corporation established in 1966 as the endowment agency for the North Carolina Botanical Garden. Records include minutes of meetings of the Board of Directors of the foundation, of the foundation membership's annual meetings, and of various committees; files on the history of the foundation and the garden; bylaws; membership lists; correspondence; records relating to the North Carolina Botanical Garden; and other material.
The North Carolina Botanical Garden is an administrative unit of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a regional center for the conservation, study, and interpretation of plants. It was established in 1952 on a 72-acre tract of university land south of Chapel Hill; since that time it has been considerably augmented. In 1988 the garden administered approximately 598 acres. In addition, the North Carolina Botanical Garden manages several natural areas around the state and works with other conservation agencies and organizations to preserve lands of botanical value. The garden was part of the Department of Botany until 1982, when it became a separate unit. The director of the garden now reports to the university's provost. The North Carolina Botanical Garden Foundation, an independent support organization, raises money and acquires and holds lands for the garden.
The North Carolina Education Research Council was established in 1998 to provide research-based information to the North Carolina Education Cabinet, which included state officials concerned with education policy: the governor; the chair of the State Board of Education; the North Carolina Superintendent of Public Instruction; and the presidents of the University of North Carolina (System), the North Carolina Community College System, and the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. The council consisted of six members, each appointed by one of the members of the Education Cabinet. The council, in turn, appointed a director to administer research on issues that the council determined. For administrative purposes, the director and research staff were based in General Administration of the University of North Carolina (System). General Administration also provided staff assistance as needed to the council. Significant initiatives backed by the council included Governor James B. Hunt's NC Schools First in America challenge, Governor Michael Easley's Education First Task Force, and the Duke-University of North Carolina Research Consortium on Minority Achievement Gaps. The Spencer Foundation and the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation provided grants that supported much of the research. The North Carolina Education Research Council was discontinued in 2003.
The North Carolina Health Careers Access Program (NC-HCAP) was established at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1971 through the efforts of Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences Cecil G. Sheps. The program, known as the North Carolina Health Manpower Development Program (NC-HMDP) until 1990, sought to increase the number of individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds who were educated and employed in the health professions and, thus, to ease the shortage of healthcare workers in rural, inner-city, poor, and minority communities throughout North Carolina. The program provided a variety of resources for pre-college and college students to attract them to the health care field and prepare them for health professions education programs. Though it was based administratively at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the North Carolina Health Manpower Development Program was an inter-institutional program of the University of North Carolina System. By 1976, affiliated health careers centers had been established at Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina Central University, and Pembroke State University (later the University of North Carolina at Pembroke). The North Carolina Health Careers Access Program also worked closely with the North Carolina Area Health Education Centers Program (AHEC).
The North Carolina Institute of Education was founded on 22 June 1831 by University of North Carolina professors and state leaders of the public school movement. The purpose of the institute was to diffuse knowledge on the subject of education and by every proper means to improve the condition of the common schools and other literary institutions of our state. Records include minutes of the first two annual meetings of the North Carolina Institute of Education and the institute's constitution and membership list.
In 1998, the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill sponsored a weekend literary festival for readers and writers. Open to the public, this inaugural statewide event had as its focus A Celebration of Southern Writers & Readers. Over 100 writers appeared on the festival program, giving talks, leading forums and panel discussions, and reading from their works. Subsequent festivals were held in 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2009, alternately hosted by the libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, and Duke University. The 2002 and 2009 festivals were at UNC-Chapel Hill.
The University Magazine was established in 1844 as a monthly literary journal and was published off and on under various names during the 19th century and from 1897 until 1948. For the period covered by these records, the publication was called North Carolina University Magazine. This publication was succeeded in 1948 by the Carolina Quarterly. Records are chiefly financial and include subscription lists maintained by the student treasurer, 1859-1860, and by the faculty adviser, Collier Cobb, 1892-1895 and 1897.

O

The Order of Gimghoul was founded in 1889 by Edward Wray Martin, William W. Davies, Shepard Bryan, Andrew Henry Patterson, and Robert Worth Bingham, all students at the University of North Carolina. The society is secret and available to male students and faculty of the university by invitation only.
Founded in 1904, the Order of the Golden Fleece was patterned after the Skull and Bones of Yale University. The order's goal was to unite student leaders in the resolution of student problems for the betterment of student life in general. Considered the highest honorary at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Order of the Golden Fleece selects its members based upon service to the university as reflected in scholarship, motivation, creativity, loyalty, and leadership in academic and extracurricular pursuits. The majority of the inductees are seniors; juniors, graduate students, faculty, and alumni are also eligible for membership. Women have been eligible for induction since 1972. Officers of the order include the Jason or presiding officer, the Hyparchos or vice-presiding officer, the Grammateus or secretary, and the Chrystopher or treasurer. Records include constitutions, correspondence, minutes of meetings, treasurers' records, records of the Golden Fleece Foundation, articles and books about the order, and other records of the Order of the Golden Fleece.
The Order of the Gorgon's Head, a secret society at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, was founded in 1896. Membership has always been limited to male members of the junior, senior, professional, and post-graduate classes along with male faculty members. Inductees may not be members of other societies. Officers include Princeps (chief officer), Quaestor, and Scriptor. The purpose of the Order is to promote friendship, good will, and social fellowship among its members.
The Order of the Grail-Valkyries traces its origins to the fall of 1920, when the Order of the Grail was formed to bring together the university's fraternity and non-fraternity men. The order hosted informal dances to bring the two groups together, and it served the university by contributing the dance proceeds to scholarships for deserving students. In 1976, the Order of the Grail merged with the Valkyries, a group of university women who embraced the same ideals as the men of the Grail. Since 1941, the Valkyries had been the only campus honorary society that recognized extraordinary contributions of university women. The Order of the Grail-Valkyries funds scholarships from its participation in class ring sales; it also hosts lectures and inducts outstanding students into its organization.
The Order of the Old Well is an honorary organization founded in 1949 by a group of students and faculty at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill to honor students for exemplary and otherwise unrecognized service to the university. Membership in the Order has been open to both male and female students from its founding.

P

Florence Edith "Edie" Knight Parker (1927-2016) attended UNC-CH from Fall 1947 to Spring 1949. While there, she was active in student government, Greek life, and Model United Nations. After graduating from UNC, Parker worked in the office of the Brazilian Executive Director at the International Monetary Fund for 10 years. During that time, she also earned a second bachelor's of arts degree in Economics from Georgetown University. In 1962, while travelling the world, she met and married Captain Elwin Allen "Ace” Parker in Taiwan. The couple later founded a public relations firm which provided speech writing and training for political candidates. In 1982, Edie Parker graduated from Franklin Pierce University with a law degree. The collection includes materials from the Women’s Intercollegiate Government Forum that Parker planned, orientation booklets, rush invitations, clippings about the Model UN from the Daily Tar Heel, and letters from male suitors. Parker also participated in a conference about the U.S. role in European recovery from World War II that Mademoiselle Magazine hosted in 1948. Her notes from the conference are included in the collection. Parker’s scrapbook and accompanying papers provide insight into the life of a woman student at UNC during the late 1940s.
The University of North Carolina chapter of the history honor society, Phi Alpha Theta, was chartered in December 1952. Faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduate history majors who met the grade average requirement were members. Guest lecturers, panel discussions, and social activities were featured at monthly meetings. Records of the Delta Pi Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta include the chapter's charter, bylaws, membership and initiation records, meeting schedules, bank statements, and correspondence with the national organization.
The North Carolina Alpha chapter of Phi Beta Kappa honorary society was established at the University of North Carolina in 1905. From 1920 to 1948, Francis F. Bradshaw and Ernest L. Mackie, as Dean of Men or Dean of Students, administered the chapter. From 1948 to 1966, Dean Mackie continued his activity in local chapter, district, and national affairs while he was a full-time member of the university's Department of Mathematics.
Phi Eta Sigma is the honorary scholastic society for college freshmen. The society was founded at the University of Illinois in 1923. The University of North Carolina Chapter was established in 1947. Records, 1947-1965, of Phi Eta Sigma, University of North Carolina Chapter, consist of the charter, 1947, and photographs and membership lists.
The Gamma Lambda Chapter of the Phi Mu Fraternity was colonized at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1964. Founded in 1852 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Ga., Phi Mu is the second oldest female fraternal organization established in the United States.

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The North Carolina Distinguished Service Award for Women has been presented annually since 1950 by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Epsilon Beta Chapter of Chi Omega Fraternity. The award recognizes a long and distinguished career or achievement by a North Carolina woman. The Selection Committee is made up of representatives of the university administration along with student and alumna members of the fraternity. The Original Accession of the committee records was largely generated under Chair Douglass Hunt, 1973-1995. It includes correspondence, 1975-1995; meeting minutes, 1971-1993; copies of award citations; and speeches delivered by award recipients. Most of the citations and speeches are post-1970. The Addition of March 2014 consists of records kept by Division of Student Affairs staff who provided administrative support to the committee, beginning with Dean of Women Katherine Kennedy Carmichael, who served as its secretary from the 1950s through 1977. These records are duplicative of some of the materials in the Original Accession, but they include the bulk of the materials related to the awards given prior to 1972. Included are files on awards given 1954-1992, which include committee minutes, lists of nominees, correspondence, and some citations and speeches.
The Shakspere Club was organized during October 1886 by professors of the University of North Carolina Department of English, led by Thomas Hume, Professor of English Language and Literature. Hume served as president of the Club from 1886 until it disbanded upon his retirement in 1907. The initial purpose of the Shakspere Club was to stimulate and guide scholarly studies of Shakespeare and his work. However, the scope of the Club's activities expanded to include comparative studies of dramatic literature and English composition in general. Meetings, conducted as seminars, were held monthly and were devoted to the presentation of papers by members. The Club envisioned publication of its proceedings, but only the 1886-1887 Journal of the Shakspere Club appeared. Records of the Shakspere Club include executive committee minutes, Club meeting minutes, and the Journal of the Shakspere Club, 1886-1887.
The North Carolina Xi chapter of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity was established at the University of North Carolina in 1857. It was the third chapter of the fraternity, which was founded at the University of Alabama in 1856.
Sigma Alpha Iota is an international music fraternity for women founded in 1903 at the University of Michigan School of Music. The Iota Tau chapter of Sigma Alpha Iota was chartered on April 29, 1946 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 1955, the chapter of went inactive. At the time, only music majors were admitted to the fraternity, and because few women entered UNC as first-years or sophomores at that time (many instead transferring in from women's colleges as juniors), there weren't many students eligible to pledge the organization. The chapter reactivated on April 7, 1977 with eleven members and has remained active since. Today, the organization is open to any woman student with an interest in music who has taken at least one music class. The chapter supports the Music Department, provides receptions for recitals and concerts, hosts formals, semi-formals, and other events, funds a Music Department scholarship, and promotes community among students involved in music at the University. These records include meeting minutes, flyers, programs, yearbooks, member manuals, and photographs and scrapbooks documenting the chapter's activities.
Oliver Smithies (1925-2017) was a British-born American geneticist and biochemist who won the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for developing gene targeting, a technology used to create animal models of human diseases in mice. This collection contains Smithies's class notes and tutorial essays written during his time as a student at the University of Oxford, as well as research notes, student papers, and laboratory notebooks compiled by Smithies throughout his career. Of particular note are some of Smithies's research notes related to the discoveries that helped earn him the Nobel Prize.
The Society of the Sigma Xi was founded at Cornell University in 1886 to encourage original research in the pure and applied sciences. The University of North Carolina Chapter was chartered on 30 December 1919 and held its first meeting on 26 May 1920. In addition to lectures held throughout the year, the main function of the chapter was the annual initiation ceremony held in conjunction with the annual meeting during the University's commencement week.
The Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, established on 1 July 1988, supports scholarship and cultural understanding of the African diaspora through the interdisciplinary examination of art, culture, literature, and history.
Under the editorship of Sturgis E. Leavitt, University of North Carolina professor of romance languages, the South Atlantic Modern Language Association's South Atlantic Bulletin was published in Chapel Hill by the University of North Carolina Press. Emory University English Professor Thomas H. English served as associate editor of the Bulletin from 1934 to 1949. The records consist of correspondence, 1934-1949, chiefly between Sturgis E. Leavitt and Thomas H. English. Letters discuss affairs of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, as well as specific articles and reviews proposed for publication in the South Atlantic Bulletin.
The Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies was established in 1963 under the auspices of the Duke University-University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Cooperative Program in the Humanities. Supported by grant funding, summer institutes were held for the purpose of improving teaching and scholarship. Each institute consisted of seminars conducted by senior fellows and attended by junior fellows. Location of the institutes alternated between the campuses of Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A joint committee of faculty members from each campus planned and operated the program. Beginning in 1968, the joint committee initiated a fund-raising effort for continuation of the institutes. Institutes were held through the summer of 1979, but the joint committee was not able to secure a commitment of permanent funding from either Duke University or UNC-Chapel Hill. Plans for the 1980 institute were cancelled due to lack of funding. Records of the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies include minutes of the meetings of the joint Duke University-University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill committee and correspondence of the committee chairs. In the main, the files deal with funding problems and efforts to obtain commitments for continuing support for the program. Also included are programs of the summer institutes and lists of senior and junior fellows for the various institutes.
The Southern Council on International Relations (SCIR) was established in 1937 as a non-partisan, nonprofit, civic association by a group of civic, religious, and educational leaders representing the ten southeastern states. The purpose of the council was to counter the growth of isolationism in the South and the nation by promoting international understanding through public education. The council supported the United Nations, the International Trade Organization, the international exchange of students and teachers, the Good Neighbor Policy, the strengthening of ties between the people of the United States and Latin America, and other international institutions and programs promoting cooperation among nations in the interest of peace, prosperity, and mutual understanding. The central office of the council was located at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Executive secretaries of the council were Keener Chapman Frazer of the University of North Carolina Department of Political Science, 1937-1943; Fletcher Melvin Green of the university's Department of History, 1943-1944; and Eugene Pfaff, 1944-1946. Records of the Southern Council on International Relations (SCIR) consist primarily of files of the executive secretary or director. Most of the material is correspondence with members of the council and with officials of civic, religious, and political organizations. Also included are minutes of Executive Committee meetings; planning materials for meetings, institutes, educational centers, and other activities; and correspondence with and annual reports to the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Also included is a folder comprised mainly of correspondence with Leon F. Sensabaugh of Birmingham Southern University, who chaired the SCIR's Committee on the South and Latin America, 1940-1943.
The Statewide Program for Infection Control and Epidemiology (SPICE) was established in 1981 in the School of Medicine of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It was designed to provide training, education, and consultation to hospitals, long-term care facilities, and other medical facilities to prevent and control healthcare-associated infections.
William "Bill" Stauber was editor of the Carolina Buccaneer, a humor magazine published by University of North Carolina students. The magazine, published from 1924 to 1940, was known for its slightly risque content and in 1939, was at the center of a censorship controversy. Its November 1939 issue, "The Sex Issue," was considered so offensive that the Student Council called for all 3,000 copies of the issue to be destroyed. A revised edition was published a few days later with part of the provocative cover illustration covered with a white box. The collection contains the November 1939 issue of the Carolina Buccaneer, also known as "The Sex Issue"; three versions of the controversial cover; a scrapbook compiled by William Stauber about the controversy and his time at UNC; other issues of the Carolina Buccaneer; and other items.

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In 1879 the Kappa Psi Fraternity was founded for medical and pharmacy students. A chapter was established at the University of North Carolina in 1915. In 1925 Kappa Psi officially split into the Kappa Psi Pharmaceutical Fraternity and the Theta Kappa Psi Medical Fraternity. The two orgainizations then issued new charters to the chapters. The Upsilon Chapter of the Theta Kappa Psi Medical Fraternity drew members from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, while the Beta Xi Chapter of the Kappa Psi Pharmaceutical Fraternity drew members from the School of Pharmacy. The Beta Xi Chapter continues today, but the Upsilon Chapter is no longer active.
The Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) is a consortium of the libraries of Duke University, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina State University, and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. TRLN promotes and coordinates cooperative efforts between the four universities, including shared collection discovery and delivery services, and negotiates contracts and licenses on behalf of member institutions. Records document the governance, programs, and activities of the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN). Records include annual reports; records of the Governing Board, Executive Committee, the Council of Directors, and other committees; files on TRLN annual meetings and projects, and memoranda of understanding.
The Triangle Universities Computation Center was a nonprofit organization formed in 1965 by representatives of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, and Duke University to provide information processing facilities for these universities and for other educational institutions in North Carolina. The center also provided information processing services to governmental and industrial laboratories in the Research Triangle area on a time-available basis. The initial operating funds for the corporation were secured through a grant from the National Science Foundation.

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The Media and Instructional Support Center was established in 1976 to promote the development and use of audiovisual materials in University classrooms. Eventually the center became responsible for developing course materials and training faculty in their use; acquiring, installing and maintaining equipment; photographic processing; storing and providing bibliographic control of campus holdings of audiovisual materials; and operating two-way television facilities. In 1986, the Media and Instructional Support Center was divided into two, separate administrative units: the Center for Teaching and Learning and the Classroom Technologies Service Center.
The UNC Roosevelt Institute is a student public policy think tank and a chapter of the Roosevelt Institute Campus Network, a national organization. The chapter is organized into six policy centers: The Center for Defense & Diplomacy; The Economic Policy Center; The Education Center; The Center for Social Justice; The Health Policy Center; and The Center on Energy and the Environment. The record group contains administrative records, policy documents, reports, newsletters, proposals for new policy centers, event planning records, and records related to the North Carolina Undergraduate Journal of Public Affairs and the Roosevelt Review publications.
Founded in 1987, UNITAS is one of several living-learning communities at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill that connect classroom learning with residence life. UNITAS has focused on building community, tolerance, and understanding among individuals of diverse backgrounds and spreading these values throughout the larger community. Its original purpose was to ease tension in black/white relations, but it has also worked to challenge stereotypes and prejudice based on identities such as gender, nationality, religion, and sexual orientation. As of 2012, UNITAS was jointly sponsored and supported by the Department of Anthropology, the Department of Housing and Residential Education, and the APPLES Service-Learning Program, with students required to take two three-hour courses in the Department of Anthropology and to participate in a service project during their spring semester.
The University Woman's Club was established at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill in 1949 as an outgrowth of the University Newcomer's Club. Through teas, tours, excursions, dinners, and other activities, the club sought to foster closer social ties among university faculty wives and women staff members. The Newcomer's Club had been formed in 1939 and in 1969 became a division of the University Woman's Club. The purpose of the Newcomer's Division was to assist new faculty wives and women faculty and staff in becoming acquainted with each other, with the university, and with the Chapel Hill community. In 1987 the Newcomer's Division was disbanded and replaced by the Friends' Network and the Newcomer's Events Committee.
The University of North Carolina was chartered by the state's General Assembly in 1789. Its first student was admitted in 1795. The governing body of the University, from its founding until 1932, was a forty-member Board of Trustees elected by the General Assembly. The Board met twice a year; at other times the business of the University was carried on by the Board's secretary-treasurer and by the presiding professor (called president beginning in 1804). Other faculty members later assumed the responsibilities of registrar and bursar. The administrative structure of the University remained essentially the same until the twentieth century.
The Board of Trustees, elected by the North Carolina General Assembly, was the governing body of the University of North Carolina from its chartering in 1789 until 1932, when the Consolidated University of North Carolina system was created.
The University of North Carolina's Bureau of Public Records Collection and Research undertook a joint venture with the Library of Congress to collect and microfilm the early records of the states and to make this source material widely accessible. The resulting microfilm publication is The Records of the States of the United States of America. Professor William Sumner Jenkins was director of the Bureau of Public Records Collection and Research from its establishment in 1941 until his retirement from the university in 1967. The records of the Bureau of Public Records Collection and Research consist of the files of its director, Professor William Sumner Jenkins. The material prior to 1941 consists of Jenkins's correspondence as professor of constitutional law in the University of North Carolina's Department of Political Science. These files also contain materials on Jenkins's Work Projects Administration (WPA) project to collect the legislative records of the states. In 1941, the WPA project was incorporated into the Library of Congress-University of North Carolina project to produce The Records of the States of the United States of America.
The Campus Improvement Fund was established in 1923 by donations from William C. Coker, John Sprunt Hill, and James Sprunt. A committee was appointed to apply this money toward the development and beautification of the University of North Carolina campus. The records of the Campus Improvement Fund consist of the financial files of its treasurer, William C. Coker. Included are records, 1924-1926, of contributions and disbursements.
In 1969, the Class of 1938 announced its intent to give $250,000 to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to build an international student center. By 1975, however, only $60,000 had been pledged. The class gift committee then agreed to create an endowment to fund study abroad for UNC-Chapel Hill students and to assist foreign students enrolled at the university.
The College for War Training was established in 1942 to coordinate the University of North Carolina's involvement in World War II. It served as liaison with the branches of the military that set up units on campus, advised on curriculum and programs, and handled personnel matters related to the war. It was also the office responsible for implementing the GI bill. The College for War Training was phased out after the war.
The Department of Rural Social Economics was an academic department created in 1914. Eugene C. Branson was its first chair, serving until 1933, when he was succeeded by Samuel H. Hobbs. The department continued until 1938, when it became a curriculum in the Department of Sociology.
The Dialectic Society was the first of two literary societies formed in 1795, the year the University of North Carolina opened. Throughout the nineteenth century, nearly all students were members of one of these societies. Students from the eastern portion of the state tended to belong to the Philanthropic Society and those from the western portion to the Dialectic Society. The societies provided literary and oratorical training, and exercised many of the functions of student government. They also acquired books and developed extensive libraries. In 1886, the societies merged their libraries into the university library.
The Law Club was established on 24 July 1848 by students in the University's Law Department for the improvement of composition and oration. The club met monthly until it was disbanded on 30 April 1849.
The Circulation Department was formally organized around 1924. Prior to that, books were circulated and reference service was provided from a single desk.
The Philanthropic Society was the second of two literary societies formed in 1795, the year the University of North Carolina opened. Throughout the nineteenth century, nearly all students were members of one of these societies. Students from the eastern portion of the state tended to belong to the Philanthropic Society and those from the western portion to the Dialectic Society. The societies provided literary and oratorical training, and exercised many of the functions of student government. They also acquired books and developed extensive libraries. In 1886, the societies merged their libraries into the university library.
Frank Porter Graham (1886-1972) succeeded Harry Woodburn Chase as President of the Univesity of North Carolina on 1 July 1930. He served in that position until 14 November 1932, when he became President of the newly created Consolidated University of North Carolina, which included the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina State College in Raleigh, and Woman's College in Greensboro. After consolidation, the title of the chief administrative officer on the Chapel Hill campus was Dean of Administration, and later Chancellor.
The Research Club was organized by Joseph Hyde Pratt and George Howe in 1914. Records are bound typed copies of the proceedings of the annual meetings of the Research Club. The annual meetings were occasions of humor, usually consisting of fifteen-minute speeches delivered by the members on esoteric, even whimsical, subjects.
Established in 1919, the university's School of Commerce combined a liberal arts education with practical training in business principles. It offered both the bachelor of science and master of science degrees in commerce. Dudley DeWitt Carroll was dean of the school from its founding until 1950. In 1950 the school's name changed to School of Business Administration and, in 1988, to the UNC Business School at Chapel Hill. In 1991 it was renamed the Kenan-Flagler Business School. Records include the minutes of the school's Administrative Board from its initial meeting in 1920 through 1929. Minutes mainly concern course requirements and student petitions. Also included is one letter, dated 2 May 1928, from the secretary of the Administrative Board to the of the Department of Psychology concerning the psychology requirement for commerce students.
The University Club was founded in 1933 as an organization of members of the senior class who wanted to promote spirit and sportsmanship, improve inter-school relations, interest prospective students in the university, improve relations with alumni, promote freshman orientation, and foster statewide interest in the university and its activities. Records of the University Club include meeting minutes, bylaws of the club, committee lists, membership rosters, correspondence, and radio show scripts. Correspondence covers general club activities including the annual smoker, homecoming and football pep rally expenses, and the club's radio show.
The project to have a portrait painted of Frank Porter Graham (1886-1972) was initiated by University of North Carolina students in 1949, and taken up again in 1953 through the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs, not as an official act of the university, but as a project of friends of Graham. Records of the Frank Porter Graham Portrait Committee are comprised primarily of correspondence between Fred H. Weaver (1915-1972), Dean of Student Affairs and secretary of the committee, and D. Hiden Ramsey (1892-1966), chair of the committee, concerning negotiations for having the portrait painted. Also included are letters to prospective committee members and donors; correspondence with Dr. and Mrs. Frank Porter Graham; and documentation of arrangements for the unveiling ceremony and copies of the proceedings and speeches delivered at this ceremony on 19 May 1956. The history of the project is summarized in a letter of 15 April 1955 from Weaver to prospective committee members.
The Advisory Committee on Public Radio was appointed in June 1978 by the president of the University of North Carolina (System) to study North Carolina's FM radio facilities and to make recommendations to the North Carolina Task Force on Public Telecommunications, a group appointed earlier that year by the governor. The Advisory Committee, chaired by Wesley H. Wallace of the Department of Radio, Television, and Motion Pictures at the university's Chapel Hill campus, was soon given the additional responsibility of fulfilling the university system's obligation, under an act of the General Assembly, to design, plan, and implement a statewide public FM radio network.
Established in 1972, the University of North Carolina Association of Student Governments was founded and funded by students of the University of North Carolina system. Its mission has been to champion the interests and concerns of students at the campuses of the university system and to serve as liaison between the students and state government.
On 1 July 1972, the Consolidated University of North Carolina was expanded to include 16 campuses, and its Board of Trustees was replaced by the Board of Governors. The Board of Governors, made up of 32 members elected by the North Carolina General Assembly, was given responsibility for the general determination, control, supervision, management, and governance of all affairs of the constituent institutions. A preliminary Planning Committee met from January to June 1972 to establish the organization and functions of the Board prior to the Board's first official meeting on 7 July 1972.
With the creation in 1932 of the Consolidated University of North Carolina, which included the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina State College in Raleigh, and Woman's College in Greensboro, the North Carolina General Assembly appointed a new hundred-member Board of Trustees as its governing body. The records of the Board of Trustees of the Consolidated University of North Carolina (System) include minutes of meetings of the Board of Trustees and of its Executive Committee, 1932-1972; files of the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Board pertaining to the work of various committees, 1932-1956; and files of the Board's Building Committee (UNC-CH), 1945-1953; Committee on Inauguration, 1950; Committee to Nominate a President, 1956; and Health Affairs Committee, 1955-1963. The Secretary of the Board of Trustees was responsible for correspondence, minutes, and general record-keeping. An Assistant Secretary worked closely with the University President's office, providing more continuity to the Board's records than had existed prior to Consolidation. These records include files of the Secretary and Assistant Secretary pertaining to the work of the Board's committees and containing mostly background material for reports to the Board or its Executive Committee. These are not the actual records of the committees. The Building Committee (UNC-CH) of the Board of Trustees studied and made recommendations on construction and property use at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Records, 1945-1953, include correspondence and other files of the Building Committee and its chair, Collier Cobb, Jr. More than half of these records deal with the construction of North Carolina Memorial Hospital and related projects. The Board of Trustees appointed the Committee on Inauguration in February 1950 to oversee planning for the inauguration of Gordon Gray as president of the Consolidated University in October. Records of this committee include correspondence pertaining to program details, sessions sites on each campus, speakers, and finances for the inauguration; inauguration programs are filed with the correspondence. Following the resignation of Gordon Gray as president of the Consolidated University, the Board of Trustees appointed the Committee to Nominate a President to recommend his successor. The Committee's nomination of William C. Friday was approved by the Board on October 26, 1956. Records of this committee include meeting minutes, suggestions, and comments on the qualifications for president, and data on the candidates considered. These records cover January through May 1956 only. The Health Affairs Committee, a standing committee of the Board of Trustees, advised and counseled the University administration on all matters concerning the Division of Health Affairs at the Chapel Hill campus. Records of this committee include files of George Watts Hill, who chaired the committee, 1957-1972. Files include committee correspondence, minutes, and other materials related to planning for programs and facilities.
Along with its other duties, the Division of Legal Affairs was involved in the desegregation of the University of North Carolina system. In 1970, the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare notified the University of North Carolina System that it was violating Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by maintaining a racially dual system of public higher education. In response, the university began drafting a desegregation plan. Eight years of draft submissions, revisions, rejections, self-studies, and negotiations followed. The matter was finally resolved through an administrative proceeding that began in 1980 and ended with a consent decree in 1981. Implementation of the provisions of the consent decree continued for a number of years.
The University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center was established in 1965 to evaluate the effectiveness of North Carolina's highway safety programs, to conduct research, and to provide training for traffic safety professionals. It was also charged with identifying and recommending solutions to highway safety problems.
The Associate Vice President for Finance and University Property Officer was an administrative official in the Division of Finance of the General Administration of the University of North Carolina (System). One of the main responsibilities of this official was to coordinate capital improvement projects.
The Senior Vice President and Vice President for Academic Affairs is the senior academic affairs administrator of the University of North Carolina (System). Established in 1932, the System initially included the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina State College in Raleigh, and Woman's College in Greensboro. During the 1960s, the number of schools in the System doubled to include campuses at Asheville, Charlotte, and Wilmington. In 1972 the System was reorganized and expanded to include sixteen schools. The Office of the Vice President was created in 1951 and was then called simply Vice President; subsequently it was called Provost, Vice President and Provost, Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research, Vice President for Academic Affairs (in 1964), Vice President for Academic Affairs and Senior Vice President, and Senior Vice President and Vice President for Academic Affairs (beginning in 1995).
The Vice President for Finance is the senior financial officer of the University of North Carolina (System). Established in 1932, the System initially included the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina State College in Raleigh, and Woman's College in Greensboro; in 1972, it was reorganized and expanded to include sixteen schools. The name of the Office of the Vice President for Finance was originally Comptroller and has been, at various times, Vice President and Controller, Business Manager and Treasurer, and Assistant Vice President and Treasurer.
The position of vice president for planning was created in 1972 in conjunction with North Carolina's reorganization of higher education. The vice president for planning was responsible for assisting the president in planning for and documenting the long-range future character of the university system and all of its constituent institutions. Cameron P. West was the first to hold the position. West had been the director of the North Carolina Board of Higher Education, a position that was phased out as a result of the reorganization. Records are chiefly those of John L. Sanders, who was vice president for planning from 1973 to 1978. They deal with the university's desegregation plan, state aid to private colleges, and planning for state-supported education in the fields of law, nursing, and veterinary medicine. Of particular interest are files related to the accreditation of North Carolina Central University's School of Law and to the decision to build a veterinary school at North Carolina State University rather than at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. A few items date from Cameron West's tenure as director of the North Carolina Board of Higher Education, but are relevant to the files in these records.
The Vice President for University Relations of the University of North Carolina (System) advised the President on matters involving, and served as liaison with, the Trustees of the System, the North Carolina General Assembly, agencies of state government, and other outside agencies with which the University had official relationships. The office originated in 1950 as Assistant to the President and was subsequently called Secretary of the University, Vice President for Administration, and then in 1966 Vice President for University Relations. After 1969, the duties of the Vice President were distributed to other offices.
Frank Porter Graham (1886-1972) was the first president of the Consolidated University of North Carolina, which included the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina State College in Raleigh, and Woman's College in Greensboro.
In 1950 Gordon Gray (1909-1982) succeeded Frank Porter Graham (1886-1972) as president of the Consolidated University of North Carolina, which included the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina State College in Raleigh, and Woman's College in Greensboro.
William C. Friday succeeded Gordon Gray in 1957 as president of the Consolidated University of North Carolina, which included the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina State College in Raleigh, and Woman's College in Greensboro. During the 1960s, three more campuses were added to the Consolidated University. In 1972, through a major reorganization of higher education in North Carolina, the Consolidated University became the University of North Carolina, and Friday became president of the new system. Eventually the system was expanded to include sixteen schools.
C. D. Spangler, Jr., succeeded William C. Friday in 1986 as president of the University of North Carolina (System), which included 16 campuses: North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the University of North Carolina at Asheville, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Appalachian State University in Boone, East Carolina University in Greenville, Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in Greensboro, North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem, Pembroke State University, Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, and Winston-Salem State University. In 1996, the name of Pembroke State University was changed to the University of North Carolina at Pembroke.
The position of Secretary of the University was created in 1955 chiefly to act as liaison with the System's Board of Trustees. William C. Friday was the first Secretary, when the System included the University at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State, and the Woman's College in Greensboro. After Friday left the position in 1956, it remained empty until Frederick H. Weaver's appointment in 1961. In 1964, the position was abolished. In 1965, the universities at Asheville and Charlotte were added to the System. The position of Secretary was reinstated when the University System expanded to 16 campuses in 1972 and the Board of Trustees was replaced by the Board of Governors. John P. Kennedy, Jr., filled the position in 1972. Because the Secretary's duties were performed by others when the position was not operative, files similar to the Secretary's may be found among the records of the Vice Presidents for Finance and for University Relations.
The UNC Exchange Program was formed in 1997 and was responsible for creating study abroad exchange partnerships between the UNC system and university systems outside of the United States. The program was discontinued in 2016, transferring responsibility for active system-wide agreements to individual campuses.
From 1968 to 1972, the University Advisory Council served as liaison between the President of the University of North Carolina (System) and the faculties of the constituent campuses. Consisting of the chancellors and the faculty advisory committees of the individual campuses, the Council expressed faculty attitudes on matters of systemwide policy. In 1972, with the reorganization of the University System, the Council was reconstituted as the Faculty Assembly.
The University of North Carolina Hospitals Volunteer Association was formed in March 1952 as the North Carolina Memorial Hospital Women's Auxiliary. In 1967, the association's name changed to North Carolina Memorial Hospital Auxiliary and men began to volunteer. The name changed again, in 1981, to North Carolina Memorial Hospital Volunteer Association. After University of North Carolina Hospitals Hospitals became the name of the entire hospital complex in 1989, the association changed its name to University of North Carolina Hospitals Hospitals Volunteer Association. The association has provided a wide range of services to patients and hospital staff as well as outreach to the community.
The University of North Carolina Press was incorporated as a non-stock company in 1922. Its original purpose was threefold: to publish periodicals devoted to the research and writing of University of North Carolina faculty; to publish catalogs and other documents for the University; and to promote the arts, sciences, and literature by publishing generally deserving works. Throughout its history, the Press has been especially strong in the areas of southern history and literature. Although supported in part by the University, the Press remained administratively independent until 1951, when it was brought under the supervision of the University of North Carolina System's General Administration. Today the Press is a major publisher of scholarly journals and books.
Noncommercial television began in North Carolina on 8 January 1955, when WUNC-TV, Channel 4 (Chapel Hill) went on the air. The station was licensed to the University of North Carolina system. Planning began in the early 1960s for a statewide network of educational television stations. From 1965 to 2010, twelve stations joined WUNC-TV to form the University of North Carolina Television Network. The University of North Carolina Center for Public Television was established in 1979 to centralize the operation and administration of the network.
This collection consists of ephemera-materials created for a specific event or purpose and intended to be discarded after use-related to events, departments, and organizations at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Examples of ephemera include flyers, brochures, and event posters.
The Internal Audit Department aids University management by analyzing the operations, internal controls, and financial accounting of campus units and thereby determining whether resources are being used in accordance with state requirements and University policies. The position of Internal Auditor was established in 1961 in the University's Division of Business and Finance. Since 1994, the Internal Audit Department has reported directly to the Chancellor.
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and its constituent departments and affiliated organizations began utilizing the World Wide Web in the 1990s. The first campus home page went online in fall 1994.
The University of North Carolina established its Computation Center and purchased a mainframe computer in 1959, primarily to assist faculty in analyzing research data. In 1967, Administrative Data Processing (later Administrative Information Services) was established to help university departments manage their administrative data. In 1987, the Computation Center became Academic Computing Services. Academic Computing Services was part of the Division of Academic Affairs, while Administrative Data Processing was part of the Division of Business and Finance. In 1989, Academic Computing Services began reporting to the Associate Provost for Information Technology, and its name changed to Office of Information Technology. In April 1996, oversight of all campus computing was consolidated under the new position of Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer. The vice chancellor headed the new Information Technology Services (ITS), which absorbed the earlier offices that had managed academic and administrative computing and networking, namely, the Office of Information Technology, Administrative Data Processsing, and the Office of Telecommunications. Later that year, the Office of Information Technology and Office of Telecommunications merged to become Academic Technology and Networks. In 2004, Academic Technology and Networks, Administrative Information Services, and Systems and Procedures were brought together under the ITS organizational structure.
The collection consists of 135 volumes containing financial records of the University from 1927 to 1987. The majority of these records were created and maintained by the University's Accounting Department. Some of them, however, predate the formal organization of the department, which did not occur until the 1940s. All of the records are accountings of the University's state-allocated budget; they offer no information about the internal organization or administration of the Accounting Department itself. They include records of allocations and expenditures on capital improvement budgets and maintenance funds. They are not, however, a complete record of the University's finances for the period they cover.
Administrative Information Services was first established in 1967 as Administrative Data Processing. Its primary function was to provide the computer equipment, personnel, and services to process administrative data for university departments. Erwin M. Danziger was its first director and served until 1989.
The university's Physical Plant Department, established in the 1930s, for many years was responsible for facilities maintenance and for repair and renovation projects whose cost was below the threshold for capital improvements. In the mid-1990s, Architectural and Engineering Services, a unit of the Facilities Planning and Design Office, assumed responsibility for these projects. In 1998, following an administrative reorganization, Architectural and Engineering Services became a separate department within Facilities Services. The Architectural and Engineering Services Department later was renamed Design and Construction Services and became part of Facilities Operations, Planning and Design.
David Dill served as Assistant to the Chancellor for Planning from 1984 to 1993. In that position, he coordinated the University's long-range planning and priority-setting process.
Susan H. Ehringhaus was appointed assistant to Chancellor N. Ferebee Taylor in 1974. Her primary responsibility was to provide legal counsel to the chancellor on university policies; faculty, student, and employee grievances; and matters pertaining to academic tenure appeals. She also served as the university's Title IX compliance officer and as university liaison with the North Carolina Attorney General's office in court cases to which the university was a party.
John P. Evans served as Assistant to the Chancellor from 1974 to 1977.
Claiborne Stribling Jones served as Assistant to the Chancellor from 1966 to 1973 and from 1977 to 1984. In the interim, he was Vice Chancellor for Business and Finance. As Assistant to the Chancellor, he worked in all areas of University administration. Beginning in 1977, however, he specialized in the area of finance.
While retaining his position as Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Bentley Renwick served as Special Assistant to the Chancellor from mid-1977 to mid-1978. In this capacity, he visited eleven other universities and developed a proposal for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's recruitment and retention of minority students.
Douglass Hunt served as Special Assistant to the Chancellor from July 1980 until his retirement in 1996. He then continued to work part-time as Advisor to the Chancellor for Governmental Affairs until 2002.
Carl W. Smith served as Assistant to the Provost from 1972 to 1995. He was the first individual appointed to an assistant's role in the Office of the Provost. His primary duty was the handling of routine budgetary and financial matters; he was the liaison for such matters between the Provost and the units comprising the Division of Academic Affairs. He was also responsible for monitoring the affirmative action and minority recruitment and retention programs for the Division.
The Association for Women Faculty was formed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the summer of 1978 to promote intellectual and social contact among women faculty members. At monthly meetings, the association, led by its elected officers and Board of Directors, discussed topics of interest to the university's female staff. The records of the Association for Women Faculty include its constitution and bylaws, correspondence, membership lists, minutes of meetings, publicity, lists of officers, and records of honors and awards.
Intercollegiate athletics at the University of North Carolina began in 1884, when the first intercollegiate baseball game was played. Baseball and football were the most popular sports for many years, but after World War II, basketball eclipsed baseball. As the number of teams and the interest in them increased, so did the administrative operation of athletics. In 1947 the first director of sports publicity was hired. Later the Sports Information Office was established. The name of the office went through several permutations before becoming the Athletic Communications Office sometime after 2000.
The university's official observance of its Bicentennial began in August 1993 and ended in June 1994. Planning for it, however, began in the early 1980s. The Bicentennial Observance Planning Committee, appointed in 1985, set goals for the celebration. In 1987, the Bicentennial Commemoration Planning Office was created to carry out detailed planning and implementation of events. Within the next year, the name of the office was changed, first to Bicentennial Observance Planning Office, then to Bicentennial Observance Office. William P. Massey was appointed general secretary of the Bicentennial and was put in charge of the office. When Massey left the university in 1991, Steven J. Tepper, who had been assistant general secretary, assumed direction of the office's day-to-day operations. Tepper's title became associate general secretary, then executive director of the Bicentennial Observance. The Bicentennial Observance Policy Committee served as the advisory body to the office. The office was disbanded at the close of the Bicentennial celebration on 30 June 1994.
The Black Student Movement (BSM) formed in November 1967 in response to the slow pace of African American enrollment at the university and the dissatisfaction of black students with the campus chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). One of the organization's main goals was to become the voice for African American students at the university. In December 1968, it presented to Chancellor J. Carlyle Sitterson a list of demands, including increased admissions of black students, the creation of a department of African and Afro-American studies, and better treatment of non-academic employees. In 1997, on the thirtieth anniversary of its founding, the Black Student Movement presented Chancellor Michael Hooker with a list of demands, including a declaration by the chancellor of his support for a freestanding black cultural center. The BSM also organized many events and activities for African American students at the university and fostered subgroups engaged in dance, theater, gospel singing, and other cultural programs. As of 2013, it remained one of the largest student organizations on campus.
The Elections Board was organized under the Student Government constitution of 1940. Later, its name changed to Board of Elections. The board was empowered to supervise campus elections and was required to certify the accuracy of election results. Among the board's responsibilities are recognition of student political parties, certification of candidate eligibility, printing and distributing ballots, selection of polling places and personnel, ballot counting, and certification of election results.
The Board of Trustees of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill serves as advisor to the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina (System) on matters pertaining to the Chapel Hill campus. The Board also advises the Chancellor on the management and development of the university at Chapel Hill.
The Carolina Center for Jewish Studies was founded in 2003 to support the interdisciplinary study of Jewish history, culture, and religion.
The Carolina Publishing Institute, sponsored by the Division of Continuing Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, was held each summer from 1993 to 1996. It was comprised of three weeks of instruction, each week dealing with a different aspect of publishing. A local Advisory Board was responsible for planning. Doris Betts of the UNC-Chapel Hill Department of English served as advisor. Institute faculty was made up of local and national players in the publishing industry, authors, educators, and booksellers. Records of the institute include correspondence with Advisory Board members as well as general correspondence, planning documents, and copies of instructional materials that were handed out to participants.
Established in 1957, the Center for Urban and Regional Studies of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill conducts and supports both basic and applied research on urban, regional, and rural planning and policy issues.
The Center for Women in Educational Leadership was established in 1979 in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Education under a grant from the Ford Foundation. One of four such centers funded by Ford, it was founded to promote the identification, advancement, and professional development of women administrators. The center pursued its goals through surveys, workshops, and seminars.
Chancellor Ferebee Taylor created the Chancellor's Administrative Council in the fall of 1972. It consisted of the administrative officers who reported directly to him, including his special assistants and excepting the Director of Athletics. He later included the deans of the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine. The Council's membership varied somewhat, but continued to include most of the University's senior administrators. It meets weekly to discuss University-wide issues and to advise the Chancellor on policy-setting decisions.
Before 1934, the University of North Carolina campus at Chapel Hill was administered by a president. From 1934 to 1945 the dean of administration was the chief administrative officer; in 1945 the title of the position changed to chancellor. Robert Burton House (1892- ) served as executive secretary to President Frank Porter Graham from 1926 and became dean of administration in 1934.
William Brantley Aycock was the chief administrative officer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1 July 1957 until August 1964.
Paul Frederick Sharp was the chief administrative officer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1 September 1964 until 15 February 1966.
Joseph Carlyle Sitterson was the chief administrative officer for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 16 February 1966 until 31 January 1972.
Nelson Ferebee Taylor was the chief administrative officer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1 February 1972 until 31 January 1980.
Christopher C. Fordham was the chief administrative officer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1 March 1980 until 30 June 1988.
Paul Hardin was chief administrative officer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1 July 1988 to 30 June 1995.
Michael Hooker was chief administrative officer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1 July 1995 until his death on 29 June 1999. Beginning in April 1999, he had taken a two-month medical leave, during which William O. McCoy served as acting chancellor.
William O. McCoy was chief administrative officer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 12 April to 1 June 1999 and from 9 July 1999 through 15 August 2000. During the period 12 April to 1 June 1999, McCoy served as the university's acting chancellor while Chancellor Michael Hooker took a medical leave to undergo treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Hooker succumbed to cancer on 29 June 1999, and on July 9 the UNC Board of Governors named McCoy interim chancellor. McCoy served in this capacity until 15 August 2000, when James Moeser was appointed chancellor.
James Moeser became the chief administrative officer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on 15 August 2000. In September 2007, he announced that he was stepping down as chancellor on 30 June 2008 with plans to return to the university in 2009, after a year's research leave, as a professor in the Department of Music.
The Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club was a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student organization devoted to the appreciation of the science fiction and fantasy genres. Chimera membership was open to all students interested in the genres as manifested in fiction, film, television, and tabletop gaming. Between 1984 and 1996, Chimera organized an annual convention known as ChimeraCon and invited writers and critics to speak. Chimera was dissolved in the fall of 1997.
The Clinical Epidemiology Resource and Training Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was established in 1986 as the fourth training center in the International Clinical Epidemiology Network (INCLEN). INCLEN was created in 1980 as a project of the Rockefeller Foundation and became an independent organization in 1982. It sought to improve health care in the developing world by training clinicians from developing nations in research methods and sending them back to their home countries to conduct research in Clinical Epidemiology Units (CEUs). The Clinical Epidemiology Resource and Training Centers (also called Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Centers), or CERTCs, coordinated with the CEUs at INCLEN member institutions, and each CERTC received reports from and provided input to the CEUs. The CERTC at UNC-Chapel Hill was administratively part of the School of Medicine but worked in close collaboration with the School of Public Health. In the mid-to-late 1990s, INCLEN underwent a reorganization, after which responsibility for training was transferred to medical schools in the developing countries. Funding for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill CERTC's training program ended as of 30 June 1997.
A unit of the Office of Undergraduate Education in the College of Arts and Sciences, the Academic Advising Program and its advisors assist undergraduates in the College of Arts and Sciences and the General College with developing educational plans and course registration. The office is also responsible for communicating the academic requirements of the university to undergraduate students. Records include meeting agendas, minutes, and correspondence of the Eligibility Committee, the Advising Curriculum Committee, and the New Website Task Force. Also included are lists of course perspectives for the College of Arts and Sciences and the General College.
The dean has administrative responsibility for the university's College of Arts and Sciences and its constituent, the General College, which together provide the curricula leading to most baccalaureate degrees. The College of Arts and Sciences was created in 1935 by the merger of the College of Liberal Arts and the School of Applied Science. The General College was a separate entity until 1961, when it was merged into the College of Arts and Sciences.
The university's Construction Administration Department oversees all major construction projects on the campus, including both original construction and renovation, and represents the university at acceptance inspections and in all building contract disputes. From 1974 until 1987 the Construction Administration Department was called Engineering and Construction.
The Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense was established in 1972 after an ad hoc committee recommended that the university's Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs be integrated into the academic process. The Curriculum was created to administer the ROTC programs and to plan and oversee the courses that would be taught under them.
The University of North Carolina's Curriculum in Public Health Nursing began in 1940 as the Department of Public Health Nursing in the School of Public Health. The founding of the School of Nursing in 1950 brought into question the desirability of a specialized nursing program in the School of Public Health. Nevertheless, the Department of Public Health Nursing persisted as such until 1984, when it was made an interdisciplinary curriculum.
The Dental Research Center was established in 1967 to coordinate the research activities of the School of Dentistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Its creation was funded, in part, by a grant from the National Institutes of Health. By 2012, the center had be divided into three research entities: the North Carolina Oral Health Institute, the Center for Neurosensory Disorders, and the General and Oral Health Center.
The Curriculum in Folklore of the University of North Carolina was founded in 1940 and was the nation's first graduate program in folklore studies. Conceived as an interdisciplinary program, the curriculum engaged in the study of regional history, literature, and culture through ethnographic fieldwork and community engagement. Throughout its history, the Curriculum in Folklore sponsored lectures, symposia, and musical and artistic events, often in partnership with other university departments and with various state and local agencies. In the 1980s, the curriculum partnered with Tom Davenport Films to produce a series of documentary films related to regional folklife. In 2008, the Curriculum in Folklore merged with the Curriculum in American Studies to form the Department of American Studies. Folklore then became a program within the department.
The Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has its roots in the Department of Sociology, where in 1930 Professor Guy Johnson taught the university’s first course in sociocultural anthropology. In 1965, the Department of Anthropology was formally established as a unit independent of the Department of Sociology. In the 1980s, the Department moved away from the traditional four fields of anthropology (biological, archaeological, sociocultural, and linguistic anthropology) and instead pioneered a structure of three concentrations--Social Systems, Meaning, and Evolution/Ecology.
The Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, part of the University's School of Medicine, provided coursework in biological chemistry. Established as the Department of Biochemistry in 1935, it was renamed Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition in 1943; the fuller name, however, was not used until 1973. In 1991, the Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition was replaced by a new Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics in the School of Medicine.
The Department of Biology of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill formed in 1980 with the merger of the Departments of Zoology and Botany. The Department of Biology Records include the "Self-Advising Handbook for Biology Majors" and "Seminars," a booklet promoting the speakers and lecture titles scheduled for the Fall 1985 semester. Also included are the department's faculty meeting minutes from 1982 to 1999.
The Department of Pediatrics of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was established in 1952 as part of the new four-year Medical School at the University of North Carolina.
The Department of Psychology was officially established in 1920, though coursework in psychology had been offered since the 1890s.
The Department of Religious Studies was founded as the Department of Religion in 1947. Arnold Nash was appointed its first chair and remained the sole member of the department until 1950, when Bernard H. Boyd was hired as the James Gray Professor of Biblical Literature. The department established a master of arts program in 1978. In 1984, the name of the department was changed to Department of Religious Studies, and, in 1985, a doctoral program was established. In 2000, the Department of Religious Studies assumed responsibility for the John Calvin McNair lectures, which focused on science and human values. In the 1970s, the department began to develop its curriculum in Judaic studies, and, in 2003, was instrumental in the creation of the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.
The Department of Romance Languages was established in 1901 as the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and became the academic department providing coursework in romance languages. In 1905, the name changed to Department of Romance Languages. Prior to 1901, romance and Germanic languages were taught in one department, known as the Department of Modern Languages.
The Department of Social Medicine, an academic department within the School of Medicine, was founded in 1978 as the Department of Community Medicine and Hospital Administration. It was renamed the Department of Social Medicine in 1980. The department's classes, research, and service focus on the social and cultural factors influencing health and medicine. This collection includes administrative records of the Department of Social Medicine, records related to grant projects, and records documenting department committees and events.
The position of Housing Officer was created in 1946 in the university's Office of Admissions to handle arrangements for student housing. In 1954, the Housing Officer was moved to the newly created Division of Student Affairs. The title of both the officer and office have varied though their functions have remained essentially the same. From 1956 to 1970, the Director of Housing was in charge of the Housing Office. In 1970, the Department of Residence Life was created, and the Housing Office was incorporated into it. In 1973, the Department of University Housing was established.
The Department of Art was created in 1936. Originally its curriculum was limited to art history; later, courses in studio art were added. The chairman of the Department of Art was also the director of the university's art museum until 1974, when the museum became a separate administrative unit. Established in 1937, the art museum was first located in Person Hall. In 1958, a new building was completed with funds from the bequest of William Hayes Ackland. The museum then moved and was renamed the William Hayes Ackland Memorial Art Center; in 1979, its name changed again, to the Ackland Art Museum. (Records of the art museum after 1974 are a separate record group).
Intercollegiate athletics at the University of North Carolina began in 1884 with a baseball game against Bingham Military School. The position of director of athletics was established in 1915 to provide oversight for intercollegiate sports. Beginning in 1937, the director of athletics was also the chair of the Department of Physical Education and Athletics. In 1938, the Educational Foundation was established to support the athletic program by raising funds for facilities and scholarships. During 1954-1955, the Department of Physical Education and Athletics was divided into the Department of Physical Education and the Department of Athletics, the latter assuming responsibility for intercollegiate sports. Also at that time, the director of athletics began reporting directly to the chancellor. There were no official intercollegiate women's teams at the university until the early 1970s. In 1974, the women's intercollegiate athletics program became part of the Department of Athletics.
The Office of the Senior Associate Athletic Director for Business and Finance was responsible for overseeing the financial transactions of the Department of Athletics, managing the accounts of each intercollegiate athletic team, and compiling a departmental budget based on information from the individual units within the department.
The Department of Biostatistics is an academic department of the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It was founded in 1949 to provide statistical training in the areas of medicine and public health. It offers both graduate and undergraduate degress, and, in addition, provides statistical and data management services to cooperative studies.
Courses in botany were taught as early as 1880, but not until 1902 was the first professor of botany hired. Thereafter Botany became a separate department and remained so until 1982, when it merged with the Department of Zoology to form the Department of Biology. The North Carolina Botanical Garden was an administrative unit of the Department of Botany from its establishment in 1952 until 1982, when it became a separate unit. Records consist mainly of correspondence and memoranda of the department chairmen and annual reports from the department. Of special interest are letters relating to the National Science Foundation Summer Institutes for Science Teachers; files on the North Carolina Botanical Garden, 1952-1967; and files relating to the merger of the departments of Botany and Zoology, 1981-1983.
The University of North Carolina appointed its first professor of chemistry in 1819; the Department of Chemistry was organized in the 1890s.
The Department of Dramatic Art was established in 1936. Prior to that, instruction in the history of theater and comparative drama was given in the Department of English. In addition to its academic instruction, the new department produced plays and supported dramatic efforts. The Carolina Playmakers, founded in 1918, became its production unit. In 1980, the Carolina Playmakers was reorganized as the PlayMakers Repertory Company, a semi-professional theatrical company. Subsequently, the Laboratory Theater, which formed about 1971, assumed the production of student plays in the department. The Carolina Dramatic Association, begun in 1922, was a cooperative program of the Department of Dramatic Art and the University Extension Division's Bureau of Community Drama. The Institute of Outdoor Drama was founded in 1963 as an affiliate of the department; its purpose was to promote the production of outdoor drama in the United States.
Instruction in English language and literature dates to the founding of the university. The Department of English was so named by the university's Board of Trustees in 1901. It began to take on its modern form during the chairmanship of Edwin A. Greenlaw (1914-1925). Under Greenlaw, a freshman composition program and an honors program were organized, courses in speech were expanded, new courses in drama and playwriting were developed, and a comparative literature curriculum was offered. A number of these courses later formed the basis for new departments. Studies in Philology, the university's longest-running journal, was first published in 1906 by the Philological Club. Though it has never been officially recognized as a program of the Department of English, its editors have always been members of the department; and thus its records are among those of the department. In 2006, the Department of English absorbed the Curriculum in Comparative Literature, forming the Department of English and Comparative Literature.
The Department of Physical Education and Athletics was created in 1935. By the 1938-1939 academic year, both an undergraduate major and a master's degree program had been established. Initially the department included both academic instruction in physical education and the previously existing intercollegiate athletics program, but by the mid-1950s, these two branches had begun to operate autonomously, and the academic program became known simply as the Department of Physical Education. In 1980, efforts began to modernize the department's curriculum. These included multiple attempts to establish a Ph.D. program. During this process, the department's name was changed from Department of Physical Education to Department of Physical Education, Exercise, and Sport Science. In 1999, it was again changed to Department of Exercise and Sport Science.
The Department of History was established in 1891, though courses in history had been taught prior to that. In 1920, its name changed to Department of History and Government to reflect the addition of political science to the curriculum. In 1935, when the Department of Political Science was created and the government courses previously taught as part of the history curriculum were transferred to it, the name of the Department of History and Government reverted to Department of History.
The Department of Music of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was founded in 1919 and offers graduate and undergraduate curricula in music theory, performance, and musicology.
The Department of Naval Science was established in 1940 as the Department of Naval Science and Tactics. It operated in conjunction with a unit of the Naval Reserve Officers' Training Corps and was a direct result of the university's decision to aid the war effort by offering military training. Its name was changed to Department of Naval Science in 1945, and after the war it became a permanent part of the curriculum. Since 1972 the department's course offerings have been coordinated through the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense. Records include correspondence and reports, as well as articles and clippings related to the Department of Naval Science and to the Navy Reserve Officers' Training Corps program. Included is material relating to military training during World War II and later, to the establishment of the department as a permanent part of the curriculum, and to the restructuring of the department after the creation of the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense as a result of student protests during the Vietnam War.
The Department of Philosophy of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is responsible for the university's undergraduate and graduate curricula in philosophy. In 1967 the department, in cooperation with the university's Extension Division (later the Division of Extension and Continuing Education), began sponsoring the annual Chapel Hill Colloquium in Philosophy.
The Department of Physics was officially established in 1907, although courses in natural philosophy, as the subject was called through most of the nineteenth century, had been given as part of the mathematics curriculum since about 1820. In 1973, the name of the Department of Physics changed to Department of Physics and Astronomy.
Until 1993, the Department of Radio, Television, and Motion Pictures was the academic department that provided coursework in the broadcast media. It was established in 1947 as the Department of Radio. Its name changed in 1954. Throughout its early history, the department was closely allied with the Communication Center, created in 1945 to centralize the production of audio-visual media on the campus. The department and the center shared equipment and facilities; and the departmental chairman served as the director of the center. The Department of Radio, Television, and Motion Pictures was eliminated in 1993, and its curriculum was absorbed by the Department of Communication Studies and the School of Journalism and Mass Communication.
The University of North Carolina's first course in recreation was offered in the Department of Sociology in 1921. By 1941, several courses designed to prepare students for careers in recreation leadership were being offered. Beginning in 1955-1956, two recreation-related graduate degrees were offered: the master of arts in sociology with emphasis on recreation leadership and the master of science in recreation administration. Though most of the courses for the master of science degree were in sociology, some were in other departments. Thus, the Curriculum in Recreation Administration was established. It was housed initially in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, then in the School of Education (1968-1974), and then in the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1986, the name of the curriculum was changed to Curriculum in Leisure Studies and Recreation Administration. In 1998, the curriculum became the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies. The department was dissolved in 2004, and its curriculum was transferred to the Department of Exercise and Sport Science.
The Design Services Department created publicity and executed design work for university projects and departments. The Department used photographs from various sources, including the Library's University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Image Collection. It also commissioned photographs by university photographers, particularly of events and buildings and portraits of faculty and staff. In 2011, the Design Services Department was renamed UNC Creative.
An organized development program at the University of North Carolina began in 1951, when Louis Round Wilson was appointed Special Assistant to the Chancellor in the Field of Development. Wilson's successors in the position were variously titled: Special Assistant to the Chancellor in the Field of Development, Director of Developmental Affairs, Associate Vice Chancellor and Director of Developmental Affairs, Director of Development, and Associate Vice Chancellor for Development. As of 1985, the Associate Vice Chancellor oversaw the Development Office, which organized and conducted various fund-raising campaigns for the university and also worked closely with the university-related foundations, such as the Business Foundation and the Medical Foundation. The Development Office was located administratively in the Division of Development and University Relations.
The Dialectic and Philanthropic Joint Senate was formed in 1959 in an initially unsuccessful effort to reverse the decline of the University of North Carolina's historic Dialectic and Philanthropic societies. Membership increased in the 1970s as a result of publicity and special programs. Records of the Dialectic and Philanthropic Joint Senate include meeting minutes; correspondence; committee records; financial records; membership lists; constitution and bylaws; publicity materials; and pictures, some of them 19th-century images of former members of the Dialectic and Philanthropic societies. Audiovisual materials include a 1997 documentary about the Dialectic and Philanthropic societies.
The University's Bureau of Extension was established in 1913 with Louis Round Wilson as Director. In 1921, its name changed to Extension Division. The early division provided a number of programs and services to the state, including a speaker's bureau, public discussions and debates, correspondence courses, legislative reference aids, resources for public school teachers, continuing education for doctors, and the Good Roads Institute. In 1976, the Extension Division was reorganized and renamed Division of Extension and Continuing Education and was placed administratively under the Vice Chancellor for Development and Public Service.
The Employee Forum of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was established in March 1992 by Chancellor Paul Hardin to advise him and other administrators about the interests and concerns of the university's non-faculty employees and to assist in fostering open and effective communication among all levels of employees, students, faculty and the administration.
The Energy Services Department of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was created through a 1998 reorganization of the units that comprised Facilities Services. The Energy Services Department assumed the functions of the former Utilities Division, which had been responsible for the operation of the campus electric, telephone, and water and sewer utilities.
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill put its first affirmative action plan into effect 1 July 1973. In September of that year, the chancellor appointed an affirmative action officer and advisory committee. Douglass Hunt, who served as the first affirmative action officer, was also vice chancellor for administration. There was no full-time officer or separate Affirmative Action Office until January 1981. In November 1995, the name of the office was changed to Equal Opportunity/ADA Office. The affirmative action officer reports directly to the chancellor.
The position of executive vice chancellor was created in 1995 by Chancellor Michael K. Hooker to serve as the chancellor's chief of staff, coordinating daily activities of the chancellor's office and serving as advisor, planner, and troubleshooter on matters across campus. In addition to handling routine management functions of the chancellor's office, the executive vice chancellor oversaw the divisions of Business and Finance (including Auxiliary Services, Facilities Services, and Human Resources), Student Affairs, and University Advancement as well as the area of information technology. Elson S. Floyd served as executive vice chancellor from September 1995 until his resignation in July 1998. The vacant post was not filled, and the position was later eliminated. Records consist mainly of correspondence and reports reflective of the cross-campus issues addressed by Floyd as executive vice chancellor, 1995-1998. Of particular interest are files related to financial and budgetary matters, information technology, land use planning, student affairs, and race and personnel issues involving the university's housekeepers and groundskeepers. A few files contain background information dated 1994.
The University's Facilities Planning and Design Office was created in 1959 as the Planning Office and was given responsibility for evaluating space need requests and facilities use and for developing plans for both new buildings and renovations. (Once plans were final and a contract was awarded, responsibility for a specific project moved to the University's Construction Administration Department.) In 1974, the Planning Office was reorganized and its name changed to Facilities Planning Office. In 1987, the name was modified to Facilities Planning and Design Office. The responsibilities of the office, however, have remained basically the same.
The Faculty Club was organized as the Men's Faculty Club on 18 February 1939. Membership was open to all University of North Carolina faculty and staff. Women were admitted as associate members until 1954, when the club's constitution was amended to provide for equal membership. At its monthly luncheon meetings, the club was addressed by speakers on topics of faculty interest. In April 1981, the club disbanded for one year due to declining membership and lack of interest. For two years thereafter the club met informally without rules or dues. The club was reactivated in 1986. Records of the Faculty Club include its constitution and bylaws, minutes of meetings of its Board of Governors and committees of the board, lists of members of officers, treasurers' records, presidents' reports, programs and publicity, and correspondence.
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Faculty-Staff Recreation Association was incorporated on 9 January 1968 as a nonprofit organization. The establishment of the asssociation resulted from the findings of the Faculty Council's Ad Hoc Committee on Faculty Social and Recreational Facilities. Upon recommendation of the Standing Committee on Faculty Welfare, this committee was appointed on 21 February 1966 to inventory available facilities and to gauge faculty interest in favor of expanded programs. The recommendations of the Ad Hoc Committee were accepted and a Special Committee on Social and Recreational Facilities was appointed to implement them. Among the most important of these recommendations were the establishment of a nonprofit corporation to oversee the organization and operation of a social and recreational center and the acquisition of land for such a center. On 27 November 1967, the Special Committee held an organizational meeting at which a Board of Directors and a Charter of Incorporation were approved for the the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Faculty-Staff Recreation Association, Inc.
The Fine Arts Festival, organized in 1964 by the student government, presents to University of North Carolina students a view of the world of fine arts in action by bringing together creators, performers, and critics. Festivals were held biennially beginning in 1965.
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill had its first intercollegiate football game in 1888. In the 1930s, it began filming its football games to provide coaches with a means to evaluate and train players and to review strategic plays. Beginning in 1990, games were recorded on videotape.
The General Alumni Association of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was founded in 1843 as the Alumni Association. It met each year during commencement until 1860, when it disbanded. The association reconvened in 1872 and resumed its annual meetings in 1878. The Alumni Association was reorganized in 1911 and again in 1922, when the name became General Alumni Association. The association's central office, headed by its director (formerly secretary), has always been located on the university campus and has been responsible for organizing reunions and other alumni activities, maintaining alumni records, raising funds for the university through appeals to alumni, producing periodic alumni directories, and publishing the Alumni Review.
The university's earliest Laws and Regulations, adopted by its Board of Trustees in 1795, defined the duties and rights of the faculty. Formal faculty meetings have been held since at least 1799; the amended Laws of the University adopted by the trustees in December 1799 included guidelines for the conduct of such meetings. Throughout the antebellum period, the faculty was responsible for enforcing social as well as academic regulations and for handling cases of student misconduct. After 1875 the faculty assumed an increasing role in establishing policies governing educational activities and the awarding of degrees by the university. The Faculty Code of University Government, originally titled Faculty Legislation, was adopted by the General Faculty in 1947 and has been amended numerous times. In 1950 the General Faculty authorized the creation of the Faculty Council to act as its legislative body. The council, composed of elected members from the various faculty divisions and ex-officio members from the university administration, held its first meeting on 5 January 1951. Officers of the faculty include the chair and the secretary. The university's chancellor presides over meetings of the Faculty Council. Much of the Faculty Council's work is carried on by its standing and special committees.
The Graduate History Society was organized as the Graduate History Club in 1952. Membership was open to all History Department graduate students and faculty members. The stated purpose was to stimulate intellectual and social fellowship among history students at the university and to build up an esprit de corps that shall bind them together in their professional careers. Activities of the society included discussions of student concerns, guest lectures, seminars, picnics, and student-faculty teas.
While retaining his position as professor in the Department of English, Blyden Jackson served from 1973 to 1977 as Associate Dean of the Graduate School and from 1977 to 1981 as Special Assistant to the Dean of the Graduate School. Although his title changed, his duties remained essentially the same; they were to promote the recruitment and retention of minority graduate students and to work with the university's Student Aid Office to secure scholarships and fellowships for graduate students.
The Graduate and Professional Student Federation (GPSF) was founded in 1971 by graduate students at the university to represent their needs and interests to the Student Government and the university administration. It soon was recognized as a quasi-independent organization within Student Government and was granted seats in the student legislature. A particular interest of the federation has been ensuring that graduate students are not overlooked in the allocation of students fees.
The Health Sciences Library (HSL) was established as a unit of the Division of Health Affairs at the University of North Carolina in 1952. However, it was not named Health Sciences Library until 1968. It served as the central library for the University hospital and the division's five schools (Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Public Health) and their associated programs. Myrl Ebert (1913-2001) served as director of the HSL from its founding until her retirement from the University in 1975. She led the effort to develop the new library building, and she was also involved in the creation of MEDLARS, the biomedical bibliographic retrieval system that later became the online database MEDLINE. Records consist of correspondence and other files related to the development and operation of the Health Science Library, including annual reports, budget and grant materials, committee materials, minutes of HSL department heads and council meetings, departmental reports, salary information, newsletters, and a 1973 self-study. Also included are files relating to the development of the new library building in 1970, to the development of MEDLARS, and to the UNC Literature Exchange (UNCLE). Early files are those of Myrl Ebert, director of the library, 1952-1975.
The University's Health and Safety Office grew out of the Radiological Safety Office, which was established in 1960 to oversee the handling of radioactive materials on the campus. The Health and Safety Office was created in 1974 to ensure compliance with the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act and is responsible for safety standards involving fire, industrial hygiene, and hazardous substances as well as general public safety. The Office is also responsible for scheduling periodic worker health examinations, inspecting safety equipment, and processing worker compensation claims.
The honors program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was established in 1954 within the College of Arts and Sciences to serve academically gifted freshmen. In 1958, the Carnegie Corporation of New York awarded the honors program with a five-year, $100,000 grant to expand its offerings. The position of assistant dean for honors was created in 1967 to increase recruitment efforts, and by the end of the decade, more than 100 freshmen were being admitted yearly to the program. In 1979, a faculty committee produced a report that evaluated the program and made recommendations for its future expansion. During the 1990s, Associate Dean for Honors Robert C. Allen oversaw the $5.7 million renovation of the Graham Memorial building and the creation of the James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence (JCUE). JCUE was housed in Graham Memorial and became the home of the Honors Office when the building opened to the university community in the fall of 1999. In fall 2011, the Honors Office was renamed Honors Carolina.
Information Technology Services Teaching and Learning (ITS-TL) provides instructional technology applications and integration to support the University’s academic mission. In 2005, as part of a reorganization within Information Technology Services, the Center for Instructional Technology of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was absorbed into ITS-TL. The CIT no longer exists as a distinct organization, but many of its functions and activities are handled by ITS-TL.
The Institute for Research in Social Science is the oldest institute of its kind in the United States. It began in 1924 with a grant to the University by the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Foundation. In 1927 it became a permanent institute of the University with Howard W. Odum as its Director. The original purpose of the Institute was to sponsor and to publish research on social and economic conditions in the South and on the role of local government in promoting public welfare. Records include orrespondence and other files relating to the administration and programs of the Institute for Research in Social Science, including correspondence of Howard W. Odum. Also included are correspondence of Rupert Vance as research professor, 1938-1952, and files pertaining to the Center for Urban and Regional Studies, which began as a program of the Institute. In addition, there are 186 audiocassette tapes of various social science lectures and panels, most sponsored by the Institute under the title IRSS Colloquium, from 1983 to 1987. Although the scope of the Institute's research is no longer limited to the South, these records pertain primarily to the South.
The Institute for the Arts and Humanities serves as University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's faculty home for interdisciplinary conversation and collaboration. Records of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities consists of meeting materials for the fall 2008 and spring 2009 Advisory Board meetings and a 2007-2008 annual highlights prospectus.
The Institute of Applied Business and Economic Research was established in 1971 as part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Business Administration. Its purpose was to support research on the business and economic problems of North Carolina and the Southeast. From 1971 until its cessation in 1974, the Institute supported eleven major studies through grants from the Economic Development Administration of the United States Department of Commerce.
The Institute of Government was established in 1932 to provide training, consulting, and research services for state and local governments in North Carolina. It is one of the oldest university-based organizations of this sort in the United States and has gained distinction for the comprehensiveness of its programs. Although Albert Coates, who directed the Institute from 1932 to 1962, was on the faculty of the University's School of Law, the Institute was independent of the University until 1942, when it officially became an administrative unit. Currently the Director of the Institute reports to the Provost of the University.
The Institute of Latin American Studies was established in 1940 as the Inter-American Institute; it kept the latter name until 1947. The Institute's initial purpose was to expand the university's research materials on Latin America. Its first major program was the School for Latin Americans, which it ran from 1941 to 1945 and which brought scholars from Latin America to the Chapel Hill campus. From its beginning, the Institute has received significant funding from foundations, allowing it to expand its programs and activities to include curriculum development, aid to graduate students, support for travel by scholars, publication of research, and the planning and coordination of conferences. Currently the Institute is organized as a program in the College of Arts and Sciences and is administered by a director and advisory board.
The Institute of Marine Sciences was established in 1947 as the Institute of Fisheries Research. It was made possible largely by the efforts of R. E. Coker, chairman of the University of North Carolina Department of Zoology, and by a grant from the Knapp Foundation. The name of the institute changed to Institute of Marine Sciences in 1967. The institute's purpose is to conduct and support research, both basic and applied, in marine science and to promote the conservation and development of marine resources. The institute has facilities in Morehead City, N.C. Its director reports to the university's provost.
The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Center was established in 2003 as a unit within the Office of the Dean of Students. In 2006, it became an administratively separate unit reporting directly to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. The LGBTQ Center is tasked with providing programs, services, and resources to create a welcoming environment for all members of the UNC-Chapel Hill community.
The Acquisitions Department, formerly the Order Department, was responsible for the receipt and routing of new materials for the library. The two main components of the department were the Order Section and the Gifts and Exchanges Section. The head of the department reported to the Associate University Librarian for Technical Services. The Order Department was formally organized around 1924 and continued to be known by that name until the late 1950s, when it became the Acquisitions Department.
From 1901, when Louis Round Wilson became University Librarian, until 1961, the Library's financial records were maintained by the Librarian or one of his assistants. In 1961 the position of Business Manager was created and given responsibility for financial matters.
In 1933, stimulated by the depository acts of the early 1930s, the University Library formed a public documents department. In 1935, the Social Sciences Reading Room was created and made a responsibility of the Documents Department. Later the Business Administration and Economics Library was established. In 1957-1958, these entities were brought together as the Business Administration and Social Sciences Division, of which the Documents Department became a section. During the 1975-1976 academic year, the Division name was changed to Business Administration and Social Sciences Reference Department. Effective 1 January 1993, the Business Administration and Social Sciences Reference Department and the Humanities Reference Department merged to form a single department, named the Reference Department.
Prior to the development of the card catalog system, the Library's holdings were listed in ledger books. The Catalog Department was formally organized around 1924, after the card system had been in use for a number of years.
Until 1983 the Collection Development Department of the Library was known as the Bibliographic Services Department. It evolved as staff were needed to assist the Chief Bibliographer in the selection of materials and management of book funds. The position of Chief Bibliographer was established in 1957.
The Friends of the Library, a membership organization that provides support for the Library, was founded in 1932 and has been in continuous operation since that date.
The Gifts and Exchanges Section of the Library's Acquisitions Department received and routed materials acquired by gift or by exchange with other libraries and agencies. Until the late 1950s, the Acquisitions Department was known as the Order Department. During the 1920s and 1930s exchanges seem to have been a function of the Periodical, Exchange and Binding Department. When gifts and exchanges became a formally organized unit of the department is difficult to determine.
The Library's Reference Department was formally established in 1924 to handle inter-library loans, provide access to the non-circulating reference collection, and prepare bibliographic aids. During the 1957-1958 academic year, its name was changed to Humanities Division and, during 1975-1976, to Humanities Reference Department. Effective 1 January 1993, the Humanities Reference Department and the Business Administration and Social Sciences Reference Department merged to form a single department, again named the Reference Department.
The Manuscripts Department had its origin in the establishment of the Southern Historical Collection in 1930. A collection of mostly private manuscripts from the states of the former Confederacy, the Southern Historical Collection was assembled by Dr. J. G. de Roulhac Hamilton, who became its first director. Though housed in the University Library, the Southern Historical Collection was supported through its early years by grants and donations. In the 1940s, however, it began to receive partial support from the Library, and gradually it was integrated into the Library's administrative structure. In 1958, the Library created a more comprehensive unit called the Manuscripts Department, and made the Southern Historical Collection part of it. From 1958 to 2008, the Manuscripts Department administered not only the Southern Historical Collection, but also the Southern Folklife Collection, General Manuscripts, and the University Archives and Records Service. A reorganization of the Library's Special Collections, effective 1 July 2008, eliminated the Manuscripts Department from the administrative structure.
The North Carolina Collection is a special collection of the University Library; its purpose is to acquire and preserve all published materials dealing with North Carolina. Louis Round Wilson began developing the collection shortly after he became University Librarian in 1901, and in 1917 he hired Mary L. Thornton to be its first curator. The history of the North Carolina Collection as a distinct unit of the library dates from that time.
The North Carolina Union Catalog grew from the Joint Committee on Intellectual Cooperation, created in 1933 by the University of North Carolina and Duke University. The libraries of the two schools agreed to copy and exchange catalog cards for their holdings. In 1937, North Carolina State College added copies of its cards to the University of North Carolina file, which then became the union catalog. By 1957, 15 libraries were contributing cards. The University of North Carolina Library continued to house and maintain the union catalog, which became the chief bibliographic tool of its Interlibrary Center, estabished in 1958 to check interlibrary loan request against the Library's catalog and the union catalog and to refer requests as appropriate. By the early 1970s, over 100 libraries in the state were contributing cards. In 1977, the catalog was moved to the State Library of North Carolina.
Prior to 1850 the university library was a very small collection of books. The student debating societies, the Dialectic and Philanthropic societies, each maintained a larger library made up of volumes purchased by the student members. Not until 1885-1886 were the society libraries incorporated into the university library. Until 1901 the responsibility of operating the library was assigned to a faculty member, who worked in cooperation with members of the Dialectic and Philanthropic societies. Louis Round Wilson, who was university librarian from 1901 to 1932, was the first librarian to devote his full time to maintaining and developing the library. Even in Wilson's day, however, the collections were not centralized. Because of space constraints in the main library, numerous departmental libraries grew up. Two of these, the Law Library and the Health Sciences Library, became administratively separate. Today the University Librarian oversees the main and special library collections and co-administers a number of departmental libraries.
The Library's photoduplication program began in 1938, when a microfilm camera was purchased for filming legislative journals in the Documents Department. The volume of filming increased rapidly, and more equipment was purchased. By 1952 the Photoduplication Service was established as a separate unit in the Library; its name soon changed to Photographic Services. In 1982 Photographic Services was reorganized and placed under the direction of the North Carolina Collection.
The Library's SPA Forum was proposed and planned in the summer and fall of 1993 before being formally established in the spring of 1994. Its purpose was to raise the profile of SPA staff members in the day-to-day operations of the library and to serve as a forum for the concerns, knowledge, and experience of those staff members. Forum members were elected from divisions composed of the various library departments. Beginning in May 1994, the forum held monthly meetings to discuss topics such as employee appreciation, health and safety, employment resources, position review, and others that related to SPA employees.
Until 1972, the Library Staff Association was the only campus organization for librarians and other Library staff. It sponsored both social events and programs aimed at professional development. In 1972, the Librarians' Association at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (LAUNCCH) was established for professional librarians, leaving the Staff Association as an organization of mostly non-professional Library employees. The Staff Association ceased to function in 1996, although it was not formally dissolved until 1999. The majority of its functions had been assumed by various committees.
The Staff Development Committee of the Academic Affairs Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is appointed by the Library's director and charged with coordinating training and development activities for Library staff, excluding orientation of new staff, microcomputer assistance, and training in computer searches. The committee was established in 1981.
The university's Master of Public Administration Program was established in 1966 to offer the MPA degree. It was a joint program of the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Government though its director was appointed by and responsible to the chairman of the Department of Political Science. In 1997, it became part of the Institute of Government.
Although the Materials Research Center was formally established in 1965, its program began in 1961 with a grant to the University of North Carolina from the United States Department of Defense's Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) for basic research in the materials sciences. From 1961 to 1965, the program was administered jointly by the Department of Physics and the Department of Chemistry. In 1965, it was placed under the administrative supervision of the Vice Chancellor for Advanced Studies and Research; when that office was dismantled in 1967, the Materials Research Center was placed under the Provost, where it remained until its cessation in 1979.
In 1923 the Carolina Publications Union was established, by a vote of the student body, to oversee the operations of publications funded by student fees: Carolina Magazine, Daily Tar Heel, and Yackety Yack. The Publications Board was designated as the governing body for the union and, as such, supervised the finances, editorial policy, appointments of personnel, and other administration of student publications. The board later became an administrative agency of Student Government. Its name was changed to Media Board in 1975. Records include minutes of board meetings, bylaws, general correspondence, statements of procedure and policy, financial records, publication contracts, and personnel actions of student publications. Also included are separate files for the Alchemist, Carolina Handbook, Carolina Quarterly, Cellar Door, Daily Tar Heel, WCAR and WXYC radio, and the Yackety Yack.
Medical Illustration and Photography was a unit of the School of Medicine of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It provided art and photographic services to faculty and staff of the School of Medicine, North Carolina Memorial Hospital, and other university departments. It began in January 1953 with a single photographer and continued providing services until 2007, when the School of Medicine closed it.
The Music Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was established in the early 1930s to support the Department of Music's curriculm.
The Newman Catholic Student Center Parish at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a student center and parish serving the needs of Catholic students. An association of Catholic students, the Aquinas Club, was founded in 1949. This club became the Newman Club in 1954. The Center was built in 1968, and it became a parish in 1971.
The News Bureau had its origin in the appointment, in 1919, of a director of publications, who was responsible for keeping the state's newspapers informed of the activities of the University of North Carolina. In 1921, that position's title changed to director of the News Bureau. In 1955, the News Bureau became part of the Division of Developmental Affairs, later the Division of Development and University Relations. The name of the News Bureau changed to News Services in 1990. Records of the News Bureau (and later, News Services) of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill include correspondence of the director, 1924-1953, 1976-1994, and undated; subject files related to various university events. There are extensive materials on Commencement, dating from the late 1920s to the mid-1990s and include photographs, a film, videotapes, and audio recordings; files on the university's Bicentennial observance, also including audio and video materials, 1987-1994; and numerous press clippings on the Speaker Ban controversy of the 1960s. In addition, there are recordings of numerous feature stories and public service announcements, mostly from the 1980s and 1990s, highlighting the research and expertise of university faculty in a variety of areas and aired as Carolina News Line. There are also print versions of Carolina in the News, 1981-1986, and Health/Science News Notes, 1971-1973 and 1981-1982, both published by the News Bureau. Also of interest is a small group of letters from, notes, and drafts of several articles by Archibald Henderson, 1942-1955 and undated. There are approximately 130,000 images taken by Dan Sears and other photographers employed by the University from 1992 to 2013. These include photographic negatives and prints created 1992-2002 as well as digital photographs created 1997-2012. The images were used in a variety of official University publications including the University Gazette.
The Office of Allied Health Sciences, which reported to the Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, was established in 1970 to coordinate the university's allied health curricula and to promote allied health education throught the state. Gradually the office's role in continuing education increased, and in 1974, it was absorbed by the Office of Continuing Education in Health Sciences.
Oversight of fraternities at the University of North Carolina was gradually consolidated within the Office of the Dean of Students, beginning in the 1920s. Later, sororities became the responsibility of the Office of the Dean of Women while fraternities came under the Office of the Dean of Men. From 1972 to the mid-1980s, a series of assistant deans within the Division of Student Affairs handled fraternity and sorority matters. In 1994, the Office of Greek Affairs was established in the division. Around 2005, its name changed to Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life.
The Office of Information and Communications was established in October 1997 to promote graduate education and research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by reporting the University's research activities and by helping researchers and students find opportunities for funding. The office assumed responsibility for the GrantSource Library and research publications, which had been among the responsibilities of the Office of Research Services and, earlier, the Office of Research Administration. The GrantSource Library supported faculty, staff, and student research by providing training on grant-proposal writing, information on grants and funding sources, and other services regarding scholarly research. At the beginning of 2012, the functions of the Office of Information and Communications were split between the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and the Graduate School. The vice chancellor's office took over publication of Endeavors (through its Office of Research Communcations) and the services to faculty previously provided by the GrantSource Library (through the Office of Research Development). The Graduate School, through its Graduate Funding Information Center, took over the student services previously provided by the GrantSource Library.
The Office of Institutional Research and Assessment (OIRA) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compiles and reports data about the University including information about enrollment, financial aid, student retention, faculty teaching loads, and other statistics. These records include reports produced by the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment, associated data, and correspondence spanning from 1977 to 2014.
The records management program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill began with a 1992 National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) grant, which was received by the University Archives and Records Service section of the University Library's Manuscripts Department. University Archives and Records Service provided support and office space for the records management program, but the program reported to the Office of the Provost and was overseen by the campus-wide University Records Committee. Responsibility for the records management program was later assigned to an assistant provost, but that position was eliminated in 2002 due to budget cuts. The provost initially decided to end the records management program at that time, but was persuaded instead to transfer it to the Library. The program became administratively part of University Archives and Records Service, which was later renamed University Archives and Records Management Services.
The position of Associate Provost for Educational and Support Services began in 1985 with the appointment of Marianne K. Smythe as Acting Assistant Provost (the title was not officially conferred until November 1988). The position's responsibilities included overseeing a number of University units that previously had reported directly to the Provost, as well as representing the Provost on several University committees and task forces. Carol Reuss succeeded Smythe in 1987 and served until 1994. During that time, the duties of the position remained roughly the same, though the units supervised changed somewhat.
The position of Associate Vice Chancellor for Research existed from January 1988 through June 1990. Its primary responsibilities were to support and enhance the University's research mission by developing new research initiatives and funding sources; providing technical assistance to faculty; and serving as liaison on research matters with funding agencies and other outside organizations. Patricia L. Poteat was the only person to hold the position. The Vice Chancellor for Research's duties were transferred to the Associate Provost and Dean of Research in July 1990. However, Poteat continued to manage the initiatives she had started. Beginning in January 1989, she also served as Special Assistant to the Provost. She was appointed Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs in July 1990 and continued in that position until 30 June 1994.
The Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Business was created 1 January 1970 as part of a major reorganization of the university's Division of Business and Finance. Among the units initially supervised by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Business were the campus auxiliary enterprises, which included the Horace Williams Airport, the Carolina Inn, the Laundry Department, Student Stores, and the campus utilities. The associate vice chancellor also supervised the Campus Police (later named Security Services, then Public Safety Department), the Health and Safety Office, Traffic and Parking, and Purchases and Stores. The position later assumed responsibility for additional units, including the Food Service, other university conference centers (Quail Roost and the William Rand Kenan, Jr. Center), the Internal Audit Department, and Trademark Licensing. Records include correspondence, operating reports, budgets, and other files pertaining to the various units that reported to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Business. Individuals who have held the position and who figure significantly in these records include John L. Temple and Charles C. Antle.
H. Holden Thorp (1964-) was the chief administrative officer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1 July 2008 until 30 June 2013. Records include binders containing Chancellor Thorp's daily appointment calendars and a list of boards on which he served.
The position of dean of students at the University of North Carolina was established in 1919 and was assigned responsibility for matters related to student welfare. In 1933, the Division of Student Welfare (later the Division of Student Affairs) was established with the dean as its head. The dean continued to be head of the division until 1977, when the position of vice chancellor for student affairs was established. Subsequently, the Office of the Dean of Students was redefined; it reported to the vice chancellor and was chiefly responsible for matters of student conduct and for assistance to students with problems or concerns. As of 2011, the Office of the Dean of Students continued to educate the university community about policies and regulations related to student life and student conduct. The office served as a point of reference for students with concerns about their campus experience and provided services and programs to assist students in dealing with problems.
Women were first admitted to the University as graduate students in 1897. In 1917, Clara S. Lingle was appointed Adviser to Women. She was succeeded in 1919 by Inez Koonce Stacy, who held the office until 1946 and during whose tenure (1942) the title of the office became Dean of Women. Katherine Carmichael succeeded Dean Stacy and served until 1977. In 1972, the office of Dean of Women was abolished, and Dean Carmichael was appointed Associate Dean of Student Affairs for Supportive Services. The latter office inherited none of the functions of the Office of the Dean of Women; nevertheless, these records contain several annual reports of Carmichael as Associate Dean for Supportive Services.
Until 1989, the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies was also the dean of the Graduate School with administrative responsibility for the Graduate School and the Office of Research Services at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The office of dean was established in 1903. In 1932, when the Consolidated University of North Carolina was created, the dean of the Graduate School at Chapel Hill became dean of the Consolidated Graduate School and assumed oversight of graduate programs at the three campuses of the consolidated system. The dean was also adviser on graduate studies to the North Carolina College for Negroes. In 1969, the dean of the Graduate School became vice chancellor and dean and, in 1987, vice chancellor for research and graduate studies and dean of the Graduate School. The administrative responsibilities remained virtually the same. In 1989, the vice chancellorship was eliminated and responsibilities for research and graduate studies were divided between two sssociate provosts. In 1992, it was reestablished as the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies; and the dean of the Graduate School became a separate position.
The university's utilities system began in the 1890s with the construction of a water plant. At that time, the town of Chapel Hill lacked resources to provide complete utilities service to its residents and to the university. Consequently, the university became the developer and eventually the supplier of all utilities to the town. This arrangement continued until 1976-1977, when the university sold its public utilities. After the sale, the university's Utilities Division remained responsible for the maintenance and distribution of utilities on campus. The position of Superintendent of Utilities was created in the 1920s to oversee the operation of the utilities; the title changed to Director of Utilities in 1965. Records include files of the Superintendent, later Director, of Utilities relating to the operation of the university's electric, telephone, and water and sewer utilities. Files consist largely of reports on the status and operation of the utilities. Also included are materials relating to the Regional Solid Waste Task Force, which investigated refuse disposal and recycling in the 1980s.
The Provost is the university's chief academic officer, serving as liaison between the Chancellor and various deans and directors. Since its creation, this position has had administrative oversight responsibilities for the Division of Academic Affairs (established in 1954), and before 1966, was variously known as Chairman of the Division of Academic Affairs, Dean of the Faculty, and Vice Chancellor of the University. In 1965-1966 and since 1997, the Provost has also had oversight responsibilities for the Division of Health Affairs. In November 1988, the Office of the Provost was reorganized and charged with consolidating oversight for all educational activities at the university. The Provost became Provost/Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, while the Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs became Vice Provost/Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs. This arrangement lasted until April 1996, when a general reorganization of the university's administrative structure took place. At this time, the title reverted to Provost, and the position no longer shared responsibilities with the Vice Provost/Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, who became the Vice Provost for Health Affairs. The Vice Provost for Health Affairs was eliminated in 1997, when the Provost assumed responsibility for both Academic Affairs and Health Affairs.
The position of registrar was officially established in 1886 to handle student admissions and grade records. In 1930, the title of the position became dean of admissions and registrar. In 1942, it became registrar and examiner; the registrar at that time had administrative authority over the Central Office of Records and the newly created Office of Admissions. In 1947, the registrar's position was eliminated, and the directors of the Central Office of Records and the Office of Admissions were placed directly under the chancellor. In 1954, the Central Office of Records was placed within the new Division of Student Affairs; in 1961, it was reorganized and named Office of Records and Registration. Finally, in 1969, the Office of the Registrar and Director of Institutional Research was established and given authority over the Office of Records and Registration. The Office of the Registrar and Director of Institutional Research was eliminated in 1984. The current positions of registrar and director of institutional research, because of much administrative reorganization, are not true successors to the previous office.
From the founding of the university through the nineteenth century, academic record-keeping was the responsibility of the secretary of the faculty. Originally student exams were oral, and no grades were given. The secretary of the faculty maintained a record of student absences from chapel, recitations, and class sessions. At the end of each term, the Committee on Visitation of the Board of Trustees met on the campus and administered the oral exams. By 1835 a system of grading had evolved and written exams were in use. In 1886 the Board of Trustees created the position of registrar, but the position was assigned to the secretary of the faculty until 1916.
The position of Vice Chancellor for Administration was created in 1973 and had responsibility for several university-wide functions that previously had been under the direct supervision of the chancellor's office. These included student admission and enrollment, financial aid, and personnel management. The position was eliminated in 1980.
In 1965, under Chancellor Paul Sharp's reorganization of the campus administrative structure, a vice chancellorship for advanced studies and research was created with responsibility for all graduate studies and research activities. The new position was assumed by Professor of Physics Everett D. Palmatier. In 1967, however, the position lapsed; and its responsibilities were reassigned.
The Vice Chancellor for Business and Finance had administrative responsibility for the university's Division of Business and Finance, which consisted of the units that handle the university's budget, facilities planning and capital improvements, maintenance of buildings and grounds, security, personnel and property matters, and routine business operations. The position of Vice Chancellor for Business and Finance evolved from that of Business Manager, created in 1921 and known successively as Controller, Assistant Controller, and Assistant Controller and Business Manager.
From 1990 to 1995, Paul Baldasare, Jr., served as legal assistant to the university's Vice Chancellor for Development and Public Relations.
The Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs has administrative responsibility for the university's Division of Student Affairs, which provides extracurricular programs and services for students and oversees student organizations and activities. The Division of Student Affairs was established in 1954; it replaced the former Division of Student Welfare, which had been established in 1933 to promote and coordinate the work of all university agencies affecting student welfare. The Office of Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs was not created until 1977. This record group, however, contains papers of all the university officers who have been responsible for matters of student welfare. The titles of those officers have been Dean of Students, 1919-1945; Dean of Men and Chairman of the Division of Student Welfare, 1946-1947; Dean of Students, 1948-1954; Dean of Student Affairs, 1954-1977; Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, 1977-1980; Vice Chancellor and Dean of Student Affairs, 1980-1997; and Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, since 1997. Prior to 1966 the Division of Student Affairs also oversaw the offices responsible for academic records and student aid.
The Vice Chancellor for University Advancement has administrative responsibility for the university's Division of University Advancement, which includes the offices responsible for the University's private fundraising and for the management of its relations with its various external constituencies. The university's unified development program began in 1952 and was reorganized in 1973 as the Division of Development and Public Service. In 1980, its name changed to Division of University Relations, and, in 1985, it became the Division of Development and University Relations. In 1995, the position of Vice Chancellor for Development and University Relations was eliminated by incoming Chancellor Michael Hooker, but it was reestablished in 1996 as Vice Chancellor for University Advancement.
Responsibility for the University's graduate programs and for research administration has, at times, resided in a single office and, at other times, in separate offices. Prior to 1965 and again from 1978 to 1989, the Dean of the Graduate School had responsibility for both research administration and graduate programs. From 1969 to 1989, the Dean also had vice chancellor status. In 1989, as a cost-saving measure, the vice-chancellorship was eliminated, while the deanship was retained in a position titled Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate School. Another position, titled Associate Provost and Dean of Research, was created to handle research administration. The latter was filled by Mary Sue Coleman in 1990. In 1992, Chancellor Paul Hardin recreated the vice-chancellorship as Vice Chancellor for Graduate Studies and Research and appointed Coleman to it. Upon Coleman's departure in 1993, Linda L. Spremulli became interim Vice Chancellor for Graduate Studies and Research. Campus administrators decided then to re-establish the dual role of vice chancellor and dean. Thus, when Thomas J. Meyer assumed the position on 1 July 1994, he was Vice Chancellor for Graduate Studies and Research and Dean of the Graduate School. In April 1996, Chancellor Michael Hooker implemented a campus-wide administrative reorganization. The units within Graduate Studies and Research remained the same, but the title of Thomas J. Meyer's position changed from Vice Chancellor for Graduate Studies and Research to Vice Provost for Graduate Studies and Research.
The Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs (later Vice Provost for Health Affairs) was administrative head of the university's Division of Health Affairs, created in 1948 as the Division of Health and Medical Affairs. It consisted of the schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Public Health and centers, institutes, and programs engaged in research and public service, including the Carolina Population Center, the Child Development Institute, the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, the Research and Training Center on Blindness, and others. The vice chancellor was also the liaison between the chancellor and the various deans and directors of these units. From its opening in 1952 until 1956, North Carolina Memorial Hospital was administratively under the administrator for Health Affairs. From 1956 to 1971, it reported directly to the dean of the School of Medicine; since 1971, it has been governed by an appointed Board of Directors. In April 1996, the vice chancellor's title changed to Vice Provost for Health Affairs. In 1997, the position was eliminated, and the division's various units began reporting to the university's provost. The records include correspondence and other files relating to the administration of and programs in the Division of Health Affairs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Annual reports of the schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, and Public Health date to the 1930s. Of particular interest are files, 1946-1963, relating to the North Carolina Medical Care Commission, a state agency that promoted hospital construction, medical education, and health insurance for rural citizens. Also of interest are files, 1965-1975, concerning the East Carolina University-University of North Carolina Cooperative Committee on Medical Education, which helped plan the School of Medicine at East Carolina University. Division of Health Affairs heads who figure significantly in these records include Henry Toole Clark Jr., G. Philip Manire, C. Arden Miller, Cecil G. Sheps, Christopher C. Fordham, James R. Turner, and H. Garland Hershey. The Addition of January 2013 includes files of Vice Provost for Health Affairs H. Garland Hershey, chiefly 1996-1997, and some files of Associate Provost Edward F. Brooks, 1997-2001. Brooks assumed oversight of the day-to-day operations of the Health Affairs units following Hershey's resignation.
Women's tennis at the University of North Carolina began in the 1930s as an intramural club for female undergraduates. Somewhat later, the club began to host extramural games. A true intercollegiate women's tennis program did not exist, however, until 1970-1971, when the university became a charter member of the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. Tennis was one of six varsity teams for women established at that time. Records consist of the files of Kitty Harrison, who coached the team from 1976 to 1998. They consist chiefly of individual and team performance records and files related to matches and tournaments. Also included are scrapbooks containing team-related clippings, photographs, press releases, and personal memorabilia compiled by Harrison; team and individual photographs; and Harrison's speech at her 2004 induction into the North Carolina Tennis Hall of Fame.
One Act is a student group that provides training and advocacy services aimed at preventing sexual assault and interpersonal violence on the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill campus. Sponsored by Student Wellness, One Act also receives support from Campus Health Services, Counseling & Psychological Services, and the Office of the Dean of Students. One Act developed its training curriculum in early 2010 and hosted its first training session in late 2010. A separate curriculum specifically for Greek life was added in early 2013. One Act actively collects data on bystander intervention from student participants and has published a scholarly article based on this information. These records consist of One Act meeting minutes from February 2014 to March 2015.
The Organization for African Students Interests & Solidarity (OASIS) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was a student organization devoted to the appreciation of African culture and the fostering of unity among students of African descent. Known as AFRICA in 1981, the group later changed its name to the African Student's Association before settling on OASIS in 1996. As of 2011, OASIS was made up of several subgroups, including dance and acting troupes, a public service group, and a student publication. Among the annual events OASIS organized was Africa Night, which offered African food, entertainment, and scholarly speakers on a range of topics.
The Parachute Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, also known as the Sport Parachute Club, was founded in 1968 by students Francis J. Hale III and Robert A. Bob Bolch. Members performed jumps at Raeford Airport in Hoke County, N.C., and later at the Carolina ParaCenter in Roanoke Rapids, N.C. Club members competed in both individual and team jumps, and were judged on landing accuracy and style. The club hosted the North Carolina Collegiate and Open match at Roanoke Rapids, N.C., in 1973, and sent a team to the National Collegiate Championships in 1972 and 1973. The club acquired equipment at their own expense and received donations from parachute clubs at Fort Bragg, N.C.
The Philological Club was formed on 20 January 1893 by faculty members of the University of North Carolina's departments of Language and Literature to stimulate original research in philology. With membership open to faculty members and advanced students in the language departments, the club met monthly to review philological journals and for discussion of related topics. In 1906, the club inaugurated its quarterly Studies in Philology. Throughout its history, the club has been closely allied with the Department of English. Records of the Philological Club include minutes of meetings, summaries of papers presented, membership lists, correspondence, and financial accounts.
The university's Physical Plant Department was created in the mid-1930s and assigned responsibility for the operation and maintenance of campus facilities and grounds and for the provision of utilities. Those functions previously had been performed by a separate Buildings Department and Grounds Superintendent. By the late 1990s, the functions of the Physical Plant Department had been absorbed by Facilities Services.
The Planning Council was established in 1974, after a university self-study revealed the need for it. The Council was chaired by Professor C. Hugh Holman (1914-1981), who had directed the self-study. Its charge was to coordinate and draw up, along with the University Priorities Committee and the Advisory Planning Board, a five-year plan for the University for 1975-1980. With the completion of this plan in October 1984, the Planning Council was asked to continue indefinitely. Professor Holman remained chair until December 1978; and during his tenure, the Council formulated three more five-year plans, covering the periods ending 30 June 1981, 1982, and 1983. The Council issued subsequent plans covering later periods. The Planning Council was disbanded in 1984 with the creation of the Assistant to the Chancellor for Planning, who now has responsibility for planning.
Founded to provide a source of encouragement and information to students intending to pursue a career in law, the Pre-Law Club functioned as an information exchange for facts about the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT), law schools, and the legal profession. In addition, many club meetings featured talks given by lawyers, politicians, and law professors in order to provide professional guidance to undergraduates interested in a career in law. Records of the Pre-Law Club include its constitution, correspondence, a membership list, minutes, material about agitation for establishment of a pre-law advisor, and other items.
The Program in the Humanities and Human Values was established in 1979 as the Program in the Humanities for the Study of Human Values. Its name changed in 1984 to Program in the Humanities and Human Values. Originally part of the Division of Extension and Continuing Education, it became part of the College of Arts and Sciences in 1988. Since its inception, the program has offered public lectures, seminars, and other programming drawn from the humanities and designed to promote a more humane understanding of the world.
The Program on Aging, established in 1982, was part of the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It grew directly out of the school's 1979 federally funded Geriatric Curriculum Development Project. When the project ended, the North Carolina General Assembly appropriated funds for an ongoing Program on Aging. During its brief history, the program obtained a number of training and research grants and provided consultation to public and private agencies. It also developed the Geriatric Education Center in conjunction with the university's Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work and the North Carolina Area Health Education Centers Program. In 1989, the program's educational and research activities were absorbed by various departments of the School of Public Health, and the program ceased to function as a separate entity.
The Program on Southern Politics, Media and Public Life was established at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1997, largely through the efforts of Ferrel Guillory, who became its director. Its mission was to serve the people of the state and region by informing the public agenda and nurturing leadership. The program operated out of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication but worked closely with the Center for the Study of the American South. In 2003, it became an administrative unit of the center. On 1 July 2006, its name changed to Program on Public Life. The program was discontinued effective 30 June 2010 because of budget cuts that followed the 2008 economic recession. Guillory, however, remained on the faculty of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, where he continued some of the activities of the former program.
The university's Property Office (originally Property Division) was created during the 1969-1970 academic year to oversee transactions involving the acquisition, sale, and leasing of real property. Other responsibilities included the inventory, care, and repair of the university's museum items and historic furnishings and the management of insurance coverage (except employee benefits).
The Proposal Development Initiative (PDI) began informally in the fall of 1994 with efforts by administrators in the university's Division of Graduate Studies and Research to encourage new research proposals. By January 1995, the PDI was formally established with a part-time director. On 1 May 1996, a full-time director was appointed. PDI assumed several of the responsibilities previously assigned to the Office of Research Services, chiefly assisting researchers in developing structural and funding strategies. The director of the Proposal Development Initiative reported briefly to the Associate Vice Chancellor (later Associate Vice Provost) for Research Development, then directly to the Vice Provost for Graduate Studies and Research. Sometime in the mid-2000s, the name of the Proposal Development Initiative changed to Office of Research Development.
The Library's Rare Book Collection had its origin in the establishment, in 1929, of the Hanes Foundation for the Study of the Origin and Development of the Book, which was made possible by an endowment from the family of John Wesley and Anna Hodgin Hanes. The Hanes endowment enabled the Library to acquire a fine colleciton of incunabula, which became the core of its rare book holdings. Other endowments were later obtained and valuable collections added, including collections of Shakespeare, Johnson, Boswell, Dickens, and Cruikshank. In 1952 the Library's rare books were brought together in a new Rare Book Room. Lawrence F. London became the first full-time Curator of Rare Books in 1959 and served until 1975.
The University Research Council was created in 1945 to promote and supervise research by the university's faculty. Originally the council was also charged with pursuing government and foundation support for research. In 1957, however, the University Development Program assumed responsibility for the latter; and in 1965, the creation of the Office of Research Administration further limited the functions of the council. As of 1983, the University Research Council administered four funds from which it made small grants to faculty members. These funds were the Alumni Faculty Research Fund, which is allocated by the Development Office; the Faculty Research Fund, which comes from state appropriations; the Smith Research Fund, established in 1924 from the bequest of Robert K. Smith; and the Pogue Endowment Faculty Research Fund.
The Research Laboratories of Anthropology of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the first academic center to study North Carolina antiquities, was founded in 1939 as the Laboratory of Anthropology and Archaeology in conjunction with a statewide archaeological survey co-sponsored by the Works Progress Administration, the University of North Carolina system, the Archaeological Society of North Carolina, and several other state agencies. Its name changed to Research Laboratories of Anthropology in 1948 and to Research Laboratories of Archaeology in 1997.
The Residence Hall Association (RHA) of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered in 1968 and became active in 1971. Its membership consisted of all students living in campus dormitories and other university-recognized housing. Its purpose was to bring to light the concerns of those students and to enhance their residential experience. As of 2011, the association remained active and was one of the largest student-run organizations at the university.
The Retired Faculty Association of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was organized in 1986 to provide a means for retired faculty and their spouses to maintain a connection to the university and the academic world. The association provides information on retirement privileges and benefits and holds meetings featuring talks on topics of interest to members.
The School of Dentistry of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was established by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1949, and the first classes were admitted in the fall of 1950. As of 2012, the school offered a full array of degree programs in the fields of dentistry and oral medicine, including nine master of science degree programs, two Ph.D. programs, several certificate programs, and the Doctor of Dental Surgery (D.D.S.) degree. The school's Office of Academic Affairs, which reported to the Office of the Dean, was the unit responsible for administering academic programs.
The School of Dentistry of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was established by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1949. The school's Office of Institutional and Community Relations administered the continuing education program, which was funded through the North Carolina Area Health Education Centers Program (AHEC).
The university began offering courses in education in 1877 and established the Department of Education in 1907. In 1913, the department became the School of Education. In 1932, the department was again created; it remained a department until 1948, when it once more became the School of Education. Today the School of Education offers both baccalaureate and graduate degree programs; it is administered by a dean, who reports to the university's provost.
Library science was first offered in the university's summer school shortly after the turn of the century. In 1931 the School of Library Science was established to offer a baccalaureate program in librarianship. It was the second such school in the Southeast. In 1951 a master's degree program was established. In 1987 the name of the school changed to School of Information and Library Science.
The Alumni Association of the School of Information and Library Science (School of Library Science until 1987) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was founded in 1936 as the North Carolina Library School Association. It assists the school in welcoming new students and in providing scholarship support, internship opportunities, career information, and job placement notices. It also sponsors reunions of the school's alumni and publishes a newsletter. Records include correspondence and other files relating to the activities of the Alumni Association, including its constitution, annual reports of the president, minutes of the annual business meeting, minutes of the Executive Board, and treasurer's reports.
Courses in journalism at the University of North Carolina were taught in the Department of English beginning in 1909. In 1924, the Department of Journalism was established. In 1950, it became the School of Journalism. The school was renamed School of Journalism and Mass Communication in 1990 to reflect the expanded scope of its curriculum. The school offers bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees.
The university established its first professorship of law in 1845. By 1894 the School of Law had become a fully integrated part of the university, and students who completed a prescribed program received the LL.B. degree. Between 1902 and 1908 the school was called the Law Department; thereafter its name reverted to School of Law.
The Medical Alumni Office was created to gather records on the alumni of the University of North Carolina's School of Medicine, from the founding of the school in 1879 to its centennial in 1979, and to publish an alumni directory in conjunction with the centennial celebration.
The Centennial Committee was appointed in April 1976 by the Dean of the School of Medicine to plan the observance of the school's centennial in 1979. For two years following its organizational meeting in June 1976, the committee worked to produce a program that included a series of lectures on the history of medical education, a celebration of North Carolina Memorial Hospital's silver anniversary, the appointment of distinguished professors, and the selection of distinguished service award recipients. The program culminated in a convocation in February 1979. Later a centennial alumni directory and a history of the School of Medicine were published.
The dean is the chief administrative officer of the university's School of Medicine. Founded in 1879 by Thomas W. Harris, the school was originally private, although its courses in the basic sciences were taught by the university. From 1890 until 1896, the curriculum was only nine months long and was intended to prepare students for entrance into degree-conferring medical schools. In 1896, the program expanded to two years; and from 1902 until 1910, a four-year course was offered, with the last two years devoted to clinical subjects in Raleigh. The Raleigh branch was discontinued in 1910, however, and the school reverted to a two-year program until 1946, when on the recommendation of the North Carolina Medical Care Commission, the Board of Trustees of the university approved a four-year school. The new University Medical Center, including the expanded School of Medicine and the newly constructed North Carolina Memorial Hospital, opened in 1952. From 1956 to 1971, the director of the hospital reported directly to the Dean of the School of Medicine. The School of Medicine is part of the university's Division of Health Affairs, established in 1948. Until 1997, the dean reported to the head of the division, who, for most of that period, was called Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs. In 1997, the dean began reporting directly to the university's Provost. The records contain correspondence and other files relating to the administration of and programs in the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Of particular interest are files dealing with the expansion of medical education in North Carolina, including the expansion of the School of Medicine at Chapel Hill from a two-year to a four-year program and the establishment of East Carolina University's School of Medicine in the 1970s. Also of interest are files related to the many research centers of the School of Medicine, especially the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and there are numerous files on the North Carolina Area Health Education Centers Program, the North Carolina Memorial Hospital, University of North Carolina Hospitals, and UNC Physicians and Associates (earlier the Medical Faculty Practice Plan). School of Medicine deans who figure significantly in these records include W. Reece Berryhill, Isaac M. Taylor, Christopher C. Fordham, and Stuart Bondurant.
The School of Nursing of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was established, concurrent with the University Medical Center, as a result of the North Carolina Medical Care Commission's 1946 recommendations. The school's first dean was appointed in 1950 and its first students admitted in the fall of 1951. Today the school offers coursework leading to both baccalaureate and graduate degrees in nursing. Until 1997, the Dean of the School of Nursing reported to the Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs. Since 1997, the dean has reported to the university's Provost. Records of the School of Nursing include correspondence, meeting minutes, annual reports, and reports of faculty committees, materials related to surveys by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and National League for Nursing, as well as files pertaining to course development and to faculty research, including grant applications.
The University of North Carolina School of Pharmacy was established in March 1897 by an act of the University Board of Trustees. Upon its founding, the School was located in New West building and led by Dean Edward Vernon Howell. In 1912, in need of more space, the School moved to Person Hall. In 1925, the School moved into a building formerly occupied by the Department of Chemistry, which in 1931 was renamed Howell Hall. The School remained there until 1959, when a new Pharmacy building, Beard Hall, was completed. In 1997, School of Pharmacy alumnus Banks D. Kerr donated two million dollars to the School for a new facility. Kerr Hall was dedicated in 2003. The same year, another alumnus, Fred Eshelman, pledged $20 million to the school. In the following years, Eshelman committed an additional $110 million to the school. In 2008, the School was renamed the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in his honor. Records consist of issues of the UNC Pharmacy Student Newspaper, 1962-1965.
Courses in public health were first offered at the University of North Carolina in 1933 in the School of Public Administration. With the discontinuation of the School of Public Administration in 1936, the Division of Public Health was established in the School of Medicine with Milton J. Rosenau as Director. The Division's emphasis on graduate-level training increased until, in 1940, it was designated as the School of Public Health, with Dr. Rosenau as Dean. The Division, and then the School, was an important force in the early public health movement in North Carolina. Currently the Dean of the School of Public Health reports to the Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs.
The School of Social Work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was founded in 1920 as the School of Public Welfare. Fieldwork has been a component of the curriculum for second-year students since at least the 1930s.
The Student Consumer Action Union (SCAU) was established at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1972 as an agency of Student Government supported by student fees. Its purposes were to protect student consumer rights and improve consumer-merchant relations in the Chapel Hill-Research Triangle area by developing educational, investigative, and advocacy programs. The union focused its efforts on price levels and merchandising practices, food quality and pricing, health care, rental rates, landlord responsibilities, and tenant rights. Records of the Student Consumer Action Union include annual reports, financial records, its constitution and bylaws, general correspondence, its office manual, publicity materials, and copies of its publications and related correspondence. Subjects of the publications include automobile repair, banking, restaurants, health care, and rental housing.
When first organized in 1904, the Student Government of the University of North Carolina consisted of only the Student Council, which was solely judicial in function. In 1921, the executive function of Student Government was established when the first student body president was elected to replace the senior class president as head of the Student Council. In 1938, the first Student Legislature was organized. The Student Legislature was replaced in 1973 by the Campus Governing Council, and was renamed Student Congress in 1986. The Student Council continued to be the primary judicial body on campus, trying all cases involving Honor System and Campus Code violations. In 1968, a student Supreme Court was established, replacing the previous Constitutional Council in its jurisdiction over all other student court appeals and original cases involving constitutional questions. The Women's Association, made up of all women students, was organized as a social organization in 1917 and became a governing body in 1921. The Women's Council served as an executive body and a disciplinary power for Honor System and Campus Code cases involving women. In the 1940s, the Coed Senate was established as a subsidiary body to the Student Legislature to pass laws affecting only women students. It merged with the Student Legislature in 1956.
The university opened its first infirmary in 1858. Beginning in 1890, members of the medical faculty were responsible for treating students there. The infirmary, however, had no full-time physician until 1919, when the first university physician was appointed. The name infirmary continued to be used informally to designate the building; but as early as 1938, the university physician's annual report referred to the entity as the University Health Service. By the late 1940s, that name had changed to Student Health Service. Originally, the university physician reported to the president, then later to the chancellor, of the university. With the creation of the Division of Student Affairs in 1954, the university physician began reporting to the head of that division, the dean of student affairs (later vice chancellor for student affairs). In 1959, the university physician's title was changed to director of the Student Health Service. Records include correspondence to and from the Directors of the Student Health Service, as well as numerous reports and committee and staff meeting minutes. Files pertain to administrative matters, including space and budget needs, and to various health concerns and issues faced by the Student Health Service. Of particular interest are files from the 1940s relating to sanitary conditions on campus, files from the 1970s relating to women's health, and files on the planning and implementation of medical reimbursement insurance for students. Student Health Service directors who figure prominently in these records include Edward M. Hedgpeth, James A. Taylor, and Judith R. Cowan.
The University's Student Stores sell textbooks and other books, school supplies including computers, and clothing and various souvenir items bearing University logos. Sales from these sales fund scholarships.
In 1999 the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill established its Summer Reading Program for incoming freshmen and transfer students. Each year students are asked to read an assigned book over the summer and, on the day before the fall semester begins, participate in a two-hour discussion of the book with select faculty and staff members.
The Learning Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a center for academic development and support. It is the result of the consolidation of several such programs and services over the past fifty years. It is part of the Center for Student Success and Academic Counseling in the College of Arts and Sciences under Academic Services. Missions of the Learning Center and its predecessor programs include improving retention and graduation rates; preparing students for college-level work; supporting the academic development of student athletes and students with learning disabilities; and promoting the engagement and academic development of minority students.
Records documenting the August 2015 Hawking Radiation Conference in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by UNC Global. This collection includes videos of 20 of the conference presentations, a conference poster signed by all of the speakers, and transcripts of conference talks.
The ad hoc University Committee on Allied Health was appointed in April 1973 by Provost J. Charles Morrow and Dr. Cecil G. Sheps, Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs. The committee was chaired by Dr. Donald A. Boulton, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, and was directed to investigate the status and needs of the allied health programs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with specific focus on provisions for transfer students from the state's two-year community colleges. On 20 February 1974, the committee submitted its report recommending a new degree structure for the allied health professions programs.
In 1981, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill established the University Management Development Program to develop leadership skills among its employees in managerial positions. In 1983, a group of managers formed the University Managers' Association as a way to continue the networking that had begun among the early graduates of the University Management Development Program.
Since 1957, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools has required the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and other member institutions to conduct periodic, formal self-studies as part of the process of accreditation by the Association. In 1993, with the creation of the Self-Study Steering Committee, the University began a process that ended in 1995 with the publication of a lengthy self-study report and a visit by the Southern Association's Reaffirmation Committee. The University Reaccreditation Office was established to provide clerical and administrative support to the Steering Committee and its task forces; it was disbanded at the conclusion of the self-study.
University Women for Affirmative Action (UWAA) was organized on 27 February 1973 in response to the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Affirmative Action findings that discriminatory practices in hiring and promotion appeared to be widespread on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The goals of the organization were to work against discriminatory hiring and promotion practices, to work to equalize salary and fringe benefit levels, and to promote the organization of a comprehensive University-sponsored day care facility for children of University employees and students. The UWAA was organized into five caucuses: (1) faculty, (2) EPA non-faculty employees, (3) SPA personnel, (4) graduate students, and (5) undergraduate students. Representatives of each caucus formed a steering committee, which selected the coordinator and other officers. By mid-1974, UWAA membership had declined to the point that only the steering committee remained active. Functions of the UWAA had been assumed by the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on Affirmative Action and the faculty Committee on the Role and Status of Women. Records of University Women for Affirmative Action (UWAA) include minutes of meetings, attendance lists, correspondence, publicity material, and other documents.
The University of North Carolina Utilities Study Commission was authorized by an act of the 1971 North Carolina General Assembly and was appointed 30 November 1971 by Governor Bob Scott. Its role was to study whether the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill should divest itself of its water, sewer, electric, and telephone systems. The commission included representatives from the university, Carrboro, Chapel Hill, Orange County, and state government, as well as former members of the State Utilities Commission. The commission met monthly to discuss the need for and feasibility of divestment by the university. A final report to the Board of Governors was submitted 14 August 1972, recommending the sale of the university-owned telephone system and off-campus electrical system. It also recommended a transfer of the water utilities facility to the Town of Chapel Hill. The commission continued to meet through May 1976 negotiating the sale and transfer of the utilities. Records of the University of North Carolina Utilities Study Commission include correspondence, minutes of meetings, reports, and documents regarding the electric and telephone systems.
The Women's Concerns Coalition formed in the summer of 1988 in preparation for the installation of Chancellor Paul Hardin. Its purpose was to allow leaders from various campus organizations that dealt with issues of concern for women to present their views and priorities to the new chancellor with a unified voice. Following Chancellor Hardin's installation, the group regularly discussed university reports and policies pertaining to women. Meetings and discussions on such topics became the basis for coalition statements and recommendations that were presented to campus administrative leaders. These statements dealt with issues ranging from child care to faculty development to harassment policies. Among the groups represented in the coalition were the University Affirmative Action Office, the American Association of University Professors, the Association for Women Faculty, the faculty's Committee on the Status of Women, the Women's Studies Program, the Black Faculty-Staff Caucus, the Chancellor's Advisory Committee, the State Employees' Association, the Office of the Provost, and the ad hoc Sexual Harassment Committee.

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WUNC is the non-profit public radio service of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, broadcasting to central and eastern North Carolina through stations located in Chapel Hill, N.C., Rocky Mount, N.C., and Manteo, N.C., and streaming online at wunc.org. WUNC was located in Swain Hall on the campus of the University of North Carolina from its creation in the 1940s until 1999, when it moved off campus to the James F. Goodmon Public Radio Building in Chapel Hill. WUNC began broadcasting intermittently as an AM radio station in the 1940s, switched to FM on 3 November 1952, went off-air in 1970, and was reinstated as a National Public Radio (NPR) affiliate on 3 April 1976. WUNC initially provided listeners with a combination of daytime and evening cultural affairs commentaries, news, and music; in 2001, the station switched to a 24-hour local and national news- and information-based programming format.