Collections

Finding aids to selected archival collections in the Southern Folklife Collection are found below. In addition to browsing these collections, please search the Library’s online catalog where all of our cataloged holdings (archival materials, audio, books, and serials) are represented.

A

Mary Katherine Aldin is a freelance independent reissue producer and annotator. She wrote a blues column for the L.A. Weekly for more than 20 years; has contributed essays to several books and magazines on American roots music; and has hosted an American roots music radio show in Los Angeles, Calif.
Philis Alvic is an artist/weaver and writer who maintains a studio in Lexington, Ky. She weaves wall hangings using complex weave structures. Her textiles have been shown at more than 100 exhibits throughout the United States. The collection consists of documentation of early weaving in the Southern Highlands in Gatlinburg, Tenn., and around Penland, N.C.; the beginnings of the Penland School of Crafts (formerly Penland School of Handicrafts); and the weaving room at Crossnore School, Inc., in Crossnore, N.C. Materials include audio cassettes, documents, and photographic slides, most developed by Alvic with grant support from the North Carolina Arts Council and the North Carolina Humanities Council. Audiocassettes contain oral history interviews with weavers, their friends and relatives, and other people connected with the early years of the Penland School. Documents include pamphlets on the history of weaving in the Southern Highlands and other materials. Photographic slides include images of interior and exterior shots of the Penland School, portraits of weavers, slides of crafts, and slides of historic Penland photographs.
The Jay Anania Collection consists of audio recordings, 1973, featuring music and interviews from blues performers Arthur Jackson (1911-1977) and Henry Johnson. Filmmaker, Jay Anania, made the recordings while he was an undergraduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. They were conducted in collaboration with folklorist and record producer, Bruce Bastin, as part of Anania's personal film project on Jackson. Commonly known as Peg Leg Sam, Jackson was an African American blues harmonica player and medicine show performer, from Jonesville, S.C. In his interview Jackson discusses his experiences in show business, medicine shows, radio broadcasting, and riding freight trains. The collection also contains an interview with Henry Johnson, an African American blues performer from Union, S.C. This recording primarily consists of Johnson playing and singing blues songs on guitar. Both Jackson's and Johnson's musical careers ranged from the mid-1930s to the mid-1970s.
The Noah Angell Collection consists of unedited digital media documenting the African American gospel musician, Connie B. Steadman, of the Badgett Sisters, a folk and gospel group from Yanceyville in Caswell County, North Carolina. North Carolina-born artist, Noah Angell, created the born-digital audio and video materials as part of a documentary work on Steadman. Both audio and video files found in the collection feature interviews conducted by Angell with Steadman, as well as documentation of rural North Carolina, including audio field recordings and video landscape scenes.
The Apollo Records Collection consists of master lacquer disc audio recordings, 1943-1958, affiliated with Apollo Records, a record company and label founded in New York City in 1944. Bess Berman, one of the few women executives in the recording industry, ran Apollo Records from 1948 until it closed in 1962. The company and label was known for their rhythm and blues, doo-wop, gospel, jazz, and rock and roll releases. Notable artists featured on the recordings found in the collection include jazz saxophonist and composer, Charlie Barnet; African American comedian and film actor, Stepin Fetchit; African American male vocal group, The Four Vagabonds; African American gospel singer, Georgia Peach; African American male vocal group, The Larks; female vocal group, The Murphy Sisters; country and western singer, Merle Travis; harmonica instrumentalists, The Three Harpers; and African American blues singer and guitarist, Josh White. The collection also includes scattered memos and tape logs found with the lacquer disc recordings.
Mark Arduini was graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2003 with a B.A. in American Studies. His honors thesis was I'm Home! This is Where I Belong: Narratives of Conversion in a Roman Catholic Community.
Letters, 1992-1995, written by North Carolina folk artist Wiili Armstrong to Tori Knight Ferguson, the owner of the West Side Gallery in Raleigh, N.C., which represented Armstrong and his work.
The Association for the Preservation of the Eno River Valley (commonly known as the Eno River Association) is a non-profit conservation organization whose mission is to conserve and protect the natural, cultural, and historic resources of North Carolina's Eno River basin. Since its inception in 1965, the Association has worked to protect the environmental resources around the river and its tributaries, promoting education and advocacy through environmental and community programs, including a hike series and the long-running annual Festival for the Eno.

B

Edward Babel began studying folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1972. In 1975, Babel began conducting research for his thesis on the hammered dulcimer tradition, particularly that of Randolph County, N.C. The collection includes correspondence, photographs, audio tapes, and other materials, 1959-1980, relating to Edward Babel's research on the hammered dulcimer. Most of the items relate to dulcimers belonging to individuals, some of them musicians, or to museums. Included are a manuscript, audio recordings, and photographs, 1975-1977, relating to Harvey Jones, a hammered dulcimer player from Ramseur, N.C.; a manuscript and photographs, 1975, relating to Mrs. James P. Johnson's dulcimer, which had belonged to her father, William Butler; a manuscript and photographs, 1975, of a dulcimer belonging to the Old Salem, Inc., collection in Winston-Salem, N.C.; a manuscript and photograph, 1959-1975, relating to the dulcimer belonging to Mrs. Artemus Ward; a manuscript and photographs, undated, relating to the hammered dulcimer from the mid-19th century that was purchased by folklorist Alan Jabbour from a woman in Coleridge, N.C.; a manuscript, photographs, and audio recordings, 1975-1976, relating to Virgil Craven; and a manuscript and photographs, 1975, of a dulcimer on display at the North Carolina Division of Archives and History in Raleigh, N.C. The Virgil Craven audio recordings are of jam sessions held at Craven's home in Randolph County, N.C. They feature Virgil on hammered dulcimer, Lauchlin Shaw on fiddle, Fred Olson on guitar, and Glenn Glass on banjo.
The Banjo Newsletter Collection consists of papers, photographs, and audiovisual recordings related to the Banjo Newsletter, a monthly magazine covering all aspects of the 5-string banjo. Papers found in the collection consist of scattered photographs, articles, catalogs, banjo tabs, advertising forms, and other printed materials loosely related to the publication. Photographs depict banjo players and events sponsored or covered by the Banjo Newsletter. Some of the images may have appeared in issues of the Banjo Newsletter. Audio recordings include live recordings, interviews, demos, and dubbed commercial recordings compiled by Donald Nitchie, co-publisher of Banjo Newsletter and son of Hub and Nancy Nitchie, who started the publication in 1973. Notable artists featured on the audiocassette recordings include Eddie Adcock, Bill Keith, Don Reno, Earl Scruggs, and Tony Trischka. Also included is a born digital video featuring "Banjo Bash at Buckeystown," an event that took place at the Maryland Banjo Academy in 1998.
Russell D. Barnard was editor and publisher of Country Music Magazine, from its founding in the early 1970s until he sold the publication in 1999. Country Music Magazine reported on contemporary and classic country music musicians and groups.
The Bear Family Records Collection consists of audiovisual materials compiled by the German based independent record label, Bear Family Records. The collection primarily contains American country music materials, including vinyl test pressings of 78-rpm records, commercially produced 16mm motion picture films, and dubbed U-Matic videotapes. The 78-rpm records feature recordings by the Carter Family, Tex Owens, and Goebel Reeves, while the film and video consist of television shows, short subject films, musicals, and western films.
Becky Johnson has photographed bluegrass musicians, festivals, conferences, and related events since the 1980s.
Howell Begle is an entertainment and media lawyer and long-time activist on behalf of early rhythm and blues recording artists. In 1982, Begle met Ruth Brown, recording artist with the Atlantic Recording Corporation in the 1940s and 1950s, who had had difficulty securing royalty payments. He agreed to represent her pro bono against the recording company. Over time, his list of pro bono clients grew to more than 30 artists who had recorded for Atlantic. Begle was also a major figure in the Rhythm & Blues Foundation, founded in 1988 in Washington, D.C., with $1.5 million in initial funding from Atlantic in partial fulfillment of a legal settlement with Brown and others represented by Begle.
Jack Bernhardt (1944- ), music critic, archaeologist, and cultural anthropologist of Hillsborough, N.C., recorded, interviewed, and performed with country, old-time, bluegrass, gospel, and other musicians, including many well-known country music stars, old-time musicians, and scholars.
The Robert D. Bethke Collection consists of audiovisual materials and subject files related to folk music and traditional life of the Middle Atlantic and Southern regions of the United States, including Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, Virginia, and West Virginia. Folklorist and University of Delaware Associate Professor, Robert D. Bethke, compiled the materials, along with undergraduate students enrolled in his folklore courses at the University of Delaware in Newark, Del. Audiovisual materials in the collection consist mostly of interviews and live performances by folk, bluegrass, and blues performers, including folk singer, songwriter, and banjo player, Ola Belle Reed, of Ashe County, N.C.; traditional bluegrass guitarist and banjo player, Ted Lundy, of Galax, Va.; artist and blues musician, James "Son Ford" Thomas, of Washington County, Miss.; blues guitarist and banjo player, Franklin "Frank" Hovington, of Frederica, Del.; and folk singer, Mary Jane "Janie" Miller, of Cecil County, Md., among others. The collection also contains audiovisual materials documenting traditional life, as well as subject files that include clippings, student papers, song sheets and lyrics, transcripts of interviews, and photographic materials documenting folk performers chiefly from Delaware, but also from Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, and Mississippi.
Writer, collector, and performer Becky Blackley is an autoharp expert and enthusiast. From 1980 to 1993, she served as editor of The Autoharpoholic, an international journal that was dedicated to the autoharp. In 1981, she published Harp! the Herald Angels Sing!, a book of Christmas songs arranged for the autoharp, and in 1983, The Autoharp Book, a comprehensive history of the instrument. She has recorded and produced her own music, conducted autoharp workshops across the United States, and served as a consultant to instrument makers Oscar Schmidt-International. She currently works as a Russian-to-English translator.
The Tia Blake Collection consists of audio recordings, photographs, papers, and publications created and compiled by the writer and singer, Tia Blake Wallman. Under the name of Tia Blake, Wallman recorded an LP of American and Irish folk songs at the age of eighteen with a small record label in Paris. The LP, titled Folk Songs and Ballads: Tia Blake and Her Folk-group, was released by SFPP (Societe Francaise de Productions Phonographiques) in February of 1971. The collection primarily consists of materials related to this release, including a misprint copy of the LP, photographs, flyers, posters, correspondence, and a copy of the recording contract. The collection also includes an audio recording, 1973, of rehearsals and demos by Wallman and a guitarist, an audio recording, 1976, of original songs created by Wallman, audio recordings, 1956-1957, of Max Dunbar collected by Wallman and her mother, a recording contract between Wallman and the National Film Board of Canada, and a copy of the literary magazine, Granta, which contains Wallman's first published piece.
Phil Blank is an artist, musician, and librarian based in Carrboro, N.C. His work has been featured in art galleries local to the Chapel Hill, N.C., area, and in the Carrboro Citizen newspaper. Blank also plays accordion, tenor banjo, and tsimbl in the klezmer music group Gmish.
The Anderson Blanton Collection consists of 11 transcription discs, 1955-1956, of Oral Roberts' Broadcast, a Christian radio program produced by the evangelist, Oral Roberts, whose televised faith-healing ministry attracted millions of followers worldwide.
Clark Blomquist (also spelled Clarque or Clarq) of Carrboro, N.C., is a poster artist and musician in the bands the Kingsbury Manx and Waumiss.
Gene Bluestein was an English professor, musician, folklorist, and social activist. Influenced by the folk music revival, he taught himself to play banjo, performed as a musician, and provided educational programs on folklore and folk music in his classroom, on the stage, and on television. For most of his career, he taught English at California State University, Fresno, where he started and facilitated the Folk Artist in Residence Program. In 1974, while on sabbatical in France, he formed a folk music band with his four children called the Bluestein Family, which performed for over 20 years. The collection consists primarily of materials relating to the folklore and performing career of Gene Bluestein. Included are field recordings made by Bluestein, Bluestein's educational programs on folk music, recordings of performances by Bluestein and the Bluestein Family, and recordings of other performers. The field recordings are mostly from Bluestein's doctoral research on Appalachian folk music and narrative and feature Cal Owens, Billy Edd Wheeler, Anna Barnett, Buell Kazee, and Fiddlin' Bill Jones, as well as Moses Asch, the founder of Folkways Records. The educational programs on American folk music include lectures, performances, interviews, and television programs. Recordings of the Bluestein Family include solo recordings by family members and in other groups. There are also recordings of a number of other folk musicians in performance, including Mike Seeger's Traveling Folk Festival, featuring Tommy Jarrell, Blanton Owen, Mike Seeger, Dennis McGee, Sady Courville, and Marc Savoy, and participants in the Folk Artist in Residence Program that Bluestein started at California State University, Fresno, including the Balfa Brothers, Bessie Jones, Kenny Hall, Richard Hagopian, Lydia Mendoza, and Jean Ritchie. Other items include recordings of Pete Seeger in concert, 1956 and 1957, and a 1969 benefit concert for playwright and social activist Marvin X (also known as Marvin Jackmon and El Muhajir) by the Fresno Folksong and Poetry Quartet (Gene Bluestein, Philip Levine, Robert Mezey, and Peter Everwine).
Born in Knoxville, Tenn., on 15 July 1937, photographer Robert Bolton discovered photography in his early teens. Bolton attended the University of Tennessee, Knoxville where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English with a minor in art. Shortly after graduating from college, he became art director of Hogan, Rose & Co. Inc., an advertising agency in Knoxville, Tenn. Although he remained in this professional position for the rest of his life, Bolton continued to be an avid photographer until his death in 1988.
Peter Braasch (1972- ) grew up in Durham, N.C. In 1994, he conducted fieldwork for his senior thesis at Yale University about the history of the commercial shrimping industry in coastal North Carolina. The collection includes audio tapes and research materials for Peter Braasch's senior thesis on the commercial shrimping industry on the North Carolina coast, Bug Hunting the Way to the New South: the History of Commercial Shrimping in North Carolina. The bulk of the collection is audio interviews conducted by Braasch with seventeen fishermen from Carteret County, N.C., and Brunswick County, N.C. Manuscript material includes logs of those interviews, a copy of Braasch's senior thesis, his research notes, unpublished reports of a sociological study of shrimp fishers sponsored by East Carolina University, and other support materials.
Agnes (Sis) Cunningham, musician and magazine publisher of New York, N.Y., founded Broadside, a magazine devoted to topical songs, with her husband, Gordon Friesen, in the early 1960s. They recorded and published many of the leading folksingers of the folk revival. The collection contains materials from the Broadside offices. Sound recordings include open reel tapes and audio cassettes, many of which were used to transcribe topical folk songs for publication in Broadside. Additional recordings include demo tapes, live concert performances, and interviews, which were sent to the Broadside offices by friends, folk singers, and subscribers. The work of numerous performers is included (many of the most significant are listed in the online catalog terms below). Documentation materials include a log of the Broadside tapes, correspondence, and tape notes. The Broadside tape log is a list of the tapes in their original order. Correspondence and tape notes consist of materials included in the original tape boxes. Correspondence includes personal letters to Cunningham and Friesen from friends and contributors. Tape notes contain track listings of songs, dates of performances, and names of performers.
The Frank Clyde Brown Collection consists of dubbed field recordings of ballads, banjo music, fiddle tunes, dance music, singing games, songs, and stories, recorded in various locations in North Carolina by folklorist, Duke University professor, and founding member of the North Carolina Folklore Society, Frank Clyde Brown. The audio recordings, 1936-1940 and undated, primarily feature Anglo American folk and old-time music from western North Carolina, including the counties of Avery, Buncombe, Caldwell, Cleveland, Iredell, Watauga, and Wilkes. The collection also contains corresponding documentation, including select tape logs created by SFC staff and a tape index created by Duke University graduate student, Charles Bond, in 1971.
A musician on banjo, piano, guitar, and fiddle since childhood, Paul Brown spent years collecting and documenting traditional music in southwestern Virginia and northwest North Carolina. He worked in journalism and radio, especially for National Public Radio where, from 2001 to 2003, he was executive producer for weekend programming. He also served in several capacities as producer of NPR's Talk of the Nation and Morning Edition.
The Peter Burgis Collection consists of an audio recording of a presentation given by sound recording collector and former chief Sound Archivist for the National Library of Australia, Peter Burgis. Burgis presented the paper, titled "John Edwards, A Salute to a Great Australian," at the Australasian Sound Recordings Association Conference, which was held at the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia in April 1991. On the recording Burgis discusses John Edwards (1932-1960) of Sydney, Australia, who was one of the first collectors of early American country music and a pioneering discographer of this music. An audiocassette recording of Burgis' presentation was sent to folklorist and former chair of the Curriculum in Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Daniel W. Patterson, at the request of Irene Edwards by Australian sound recording collector, David L. Crisp. Also included in the collection is a letter from David L. Crisp that was mailed with the audiocassette when it was sent to Patterson by Crisp in 1992.
Casey Burns was born in 1975 in Hendersonville, N.C. He studied at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1993 to 1998, receiving a degree in journalism. During these years, he began to be involved in the independent rock music scene in Chapel Hill as a poster artist and musician. In 2006, Burns relocated to Portland, Ore., where he continued to create poster art.

C

The Andy Cahan Collection consists of 43 recordings, 1986-1989, created and compiled by Andy Cahan, a musician, music historian and former graduate student of folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The recordings are primarily interviews and performances of musicians from the Galax, Va., and North Carolina region, and feature Walter Raleigh Babson, Mabel Crockett, Onie Green, Carlie Roosevelt Marion, and Nell Smith. Also included in the collection are recordings, 1986, made by Cahan to accompany his term paper while studying folklore as a graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Candie Anderson and Guy Carawan met as a result of their mutual involvement in the civil rights movement and were married in 1960. The Carawans have been involved in the work of the Highlander Research and Education Center (formerly the Highlander Folk School) in Tennessee, an institution that supports and provides educational resources for progressive social and political causes in the South. The original deposit of materials is chiefly audio tapes and corresponding field notes that reflect the Carawans' efforts to document the cultures of various groups of people in the South and elsewhere, beginning in the early 1960s. Included are historically significant speeches, sermons, and musical performances recorded during major civil rights demonstrations and conferences in Nashville, Birmingham, Atlanta, and other southern cities; field recordings of worship meetings, songs, stories, and recollections from Johns Island, S.C., that document the African American heritage of the rural South Carolina Low Country; recordings of interviews with residents of south-central Appalachia concerning problems associated with coal mining and rural poverty; recordings of performances by Appalachian musicians, among them Hazel Dickens; recordings of remarks and musical performances by ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax; a discussion between Guy Carawan and Studs Terkel; recordings of performances by Mayne Smith and Martin Mull; and recordings of Latin-American, Celtic, Australian, and Hungarian vernacular music. Corresponding field notes include song lists, transcripts, box lists, memos, and photocopies of original audio housing. The Addition of 2006 contains audio recordings of musical performances and interviews collected by Guy and Candie Carawan, many of which feature members of the Johns Island, S.C., community. The Additions of 2010 primarily contains materials relating to the Carawan's professional and personal projects in the areas of civil rights, folk music and culture, and social justice, as they relate to Appalachia, the Highlander Research and Education Center (HREC), and the Sea Islands of South Carolina and Georgia. Materials relating to civil rights were collected by Candie Carawan in 1960, when she was an exchange student at Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn., where she was arrested for participating in a sit-in to protest racial segregation of lunch counters. The Addition of 2017 documents the Carawans continuing work on civil rights, Appalachia, the Sea Islands, folk music and culture, and social justice projects in partnership with HREC and others. Also included is a memoir project intended to serve as a field guide for cultural service workers and policy makers who have an impact on the quality of community cultural life.
Musician, music producer, author, and collector Bob Carlin was born in New York City in 1953. He has authored several books on southern music traditions, African American music, string bands, shape note singing, Primitive Baptist music, banjo music, and other topics, many having to do with the western Piedmont of North Carolina. He has also produced many recordings, including African American Note Choirs of Alexander County, North Carolina (2002).
The Tom Carter Collection consists of field recordings, 1970-1973, created and compiled by folklorist, historian, and musician, Thomas (Tom) Carter. The recordings feature old-time musicians from the central Piedmont area of North Carolina and the North Carolina and Virginia border region, performing old-time tunes and songs. Some of the artists featured include, Tommy Jarrell (1901-1984), Anglo-American old-time fiddle and banjo player, of Mt. Airy, N.C.; Gaither Carlton (1901-1973), Anglo-American old-time fiddle and banjo player, of Deep Gap, N.C.; Fred Cockerham (1905-1980), Anglo-American old-time fiddle and banjo player, of Low Gap, N.C.; Emit Valentine, Anglo-American button accordion player, of Franklin Co., N.C.; Archie and Lenwood Thompson, Anglo-American fiddlers, of Franklin Co., N.C.
The Tom Carter and Blanton Owen Collection primarily consists of audio recordings, 1948-1975, created and compiled by folklorists, Tom Carter and Blanton Owen. The majority of the collection consists of field tapes, 1973-1974, created by Carter and Owen as part of their joint fieldwork project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Titled, Traditional Instrumental Music From Southwest Virginia: A Field Collection and Oral History, the fieldwork project comprised of documenting the traditional music found in one region of the Southern Appalachians through recorded music, interviews, and photographs. The collection contains dubbed copies of the original field recordings that Carter and Owen created as part of the grant-funded project, as well as a copy of the original grant proposal with handwritten notations. The recordings primarily feature traditional instrumental music, mainly fiddle and banjo played in the old-time style, from southwestern Virginia and northwestern North Carolina, including Carroll, Patrick, Grayson, and Floyd counties, Va., and Alleghany and Surry counties, N.C. Included are performances of ballads, early country music, gospel songs, bluegrass music, dance calls, and tin pan alley, as well as interviews, telling of legends, and other spoken material. The music is performed on fiddle, banjo, piano, hammered dulcimer, Appalachian dulcimer, accordion, guitar, harmonica, jew's-harp, autoharp, steel guitar, and Hawaiian guitar. Performers include Huston Caudill, Luther Franklin Davis, Armstead Roscoe Parrish, Dan Tate, Fred Cockerham (1901- ), Estil Cortez Ball, Albert Hash, Kyle Creed, Taylor Kimble (1892- ), Tommy Jarrell (1901-1985), and Virgil Craven (1902-1980). The collection also includes additional dubbed audio recordings, circa 1948-1949, featuring the Shelor Family, Dad Blackard's Moonshiners, Ernest Stanley Band, Dudley Spangler, and J.W. (John Watts) Spangler (1882-1970), as well as field notes created by Tom Carter, Blanton Owen, and staff of the Southern Folklife Collection. The field notes correspond to the audio recordings found in the collection and may include notes on performers' names, technical information about the field tape, a brief description of contents, song titles, and tunings.
The Tom Carter and Chuck Rupert Oysler Collection consists of field recordings, 1973, of Willie Trice (1910-1976), an American blues guitarist, singer, songwriter, and record producer from North Carolina. The two recordings, which were made by Tom Carter and Chuck Rupert Oysler in Orange County, N.C., feature Willie Trice on guitar and vocals, as well as in conversation. The collection also contains corresponding documentation, or tape logs, created by former SFC staff members.
Yadkin County native Jerry Casstevens was a regionally well-known bluegrass banjo player who performed mostly in Yadkin, Surry, Wilkes, and neighboring counties of North Carolina and Virginia. Casstevens mastered many styles of music on the banjo, but preferred to play bluegrass. During his 40-year musical career, Casstevens won or placed in many contests, including Union Grove and Galax fiddlers' conventions. He led many different groups, but the Bluegrass Masters, with his son Mike Casstevens, was perhaps the best known.
The Classic Sounds of the South Collection includes six video recordings of concert performances by country music artists Tift Merritt and the Carbines, Johnny Irion, and Sarah Lee Guthrie, and a concert poster by graphic artist Ron Liberti resulting from a concert series sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Curriculum in Folklore, 7-8 December 2001.
The collection of Calin Coburn documents the performance career of his grandfather, the western singer-songwriter and film actor Bob Nolan, who was leader of the musical group Sons of the Pioneers and author of western song classics including "Tumblin' Tumbleweeds" and "Cool Water." Collection materials include promotional photographs, family photographs, posters for western movies, Sons of the Pioneer song catalog with lyrics sheets, sheet music, volumes of Bob Nolan materials compiled by Coburn and Elizabeth Drake McDonald, periodicals and newsletters, copyright documents, and slight, scattered correspondence. The collection also contains audiovisual materials consisting of live performances, demos, studio recordings, test pressings, movie clips and soundtracks, and award ceremony tributes and appearances.
Ronald D. Cohen, professor of history at Indiana University Northwest-Gary, 1970-2005, wrote and edited numerous books and articles, many about American folk music, and co-produced compilations of folk and topical songs. He edited Red Dust and Broadsides: A Joint Autobiography, written by Agnes Cunningham (Sis) and her husband Gordon Friesen. Sis Cunningham was a songwriter and musician who performed with the Almanac Singers, a 1940s group of folk musicians, and the Red Dust Players, a 1939 radical agitprop group that performed plays in aid of the Southern Tenant Farmers Union. Gordon Friesen was a newspaper journalist and artist. Cunningham and Friesen fled anti-Communist harassment in Oklahoma and moved to New York City where they founded and published Broadside, a magazine that documented topical and folk songs, beginning in the early 1960s. Photo-Sound Associates was organized by Aaron Rennert, Ray Sullivan, and Joel Katz in Greenwich Village in connection with Lee Hoffman and Caravan magazine to document the folk revival movement in New York City. Rennert and Sullivan did the photography, while Katz recorded the concerts.
Posters for music festivals and blues concerts held in Greenville, Miss., and Vicksburg, Miss., from 1996 to 2008 featuring artists such as Marvin Sease, Bobby Rush, Sheba Potts Wright, Willie Clayton, and others. Posters were collected Howard D. Cole of Cary, Miss.
Live audio recordings of the Sounds of the South Conference, held 6-8 April 1989 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The conference gathered more than 300 participants, including record collectors, folklorists, musicians, record producers, librarians, archivists, and traditional music lovers, to celebrate traditional southern music and the official opening of the Southern Folklife Collection with the John Edwards Memorial collection at UNC's library. The conference included panel discussions, papers, and addresses on topics related to history and issues in field collecting and recording traditional music, including old-time, bluegrass, gospel, country, conjunto, Cajun, and American Indian music, and the history of the John Edwards Memorial Foundation collection. Presenters and panelists featured on the recordings include Guy Carawan, Tom Carter, Norm Cohen, Cece Conway, Ray Funk, Alice Gerrard, Archie Green, Bess Lomax Hawes, Alan Jabbour, Alan Lomax, Bill C. Malone, Paul Oliver, Dan Patterson, Anne Romaine, Anthony Seeger, Mike Seeger, and David Whisnant, among others. Also included in the collection are field notes associated with select recordings. Field notes contain recording credits, session titles, speaker names, and topics discussed.
The Cecelia Conway and Tommy Thompson Collection consists of field recordings of African-American old-time musicans from North Carolina. Created by Cecelia Conway and Tommy Thompson in 1974, the live recordings feature John Snipes, African-American old-time two-finger and clawhammer fretless banjo player of Haw River, Alamance County, N.C.; Dink Roberts, African-American old-time banjo player of Haw River, Alamance County, N.C.; and Joe and Odell Thompson, African-American fiddle and banjo player from Mebane, Orange County, N.C. The recordings include old-time tunes and song from both African-American and Anglo-American fiddle and banjo traditions of the Carolina Piedmont. Also included in the collection are corresponding tape logs created by SFC staff. Tape logs include song titles, playback speed, and track configuration.
Bill Cook was the producer of The Glenn Reeves show, a country music television program based in Jacksonville, Fla., and broadcast on WFGA-TV in the early to mid-1960s. It was networked over 15 stations in the southeastern United States. The show starred singer and songwriter Glenn Reeves (1932-1999), best known for recording the original demo of Heartbreak Hotel, and featured a number of prominent country music artists as guests.
The Curriculum, Music, and Community Collection consists of video documentation of summer workshops hosted by the Curriculum, Music, and Community (CMC), a collaborative educational program designed by the School of Education and the Curriculum in Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to support North Carolina teachers in their efforts to incorporate the music and musical traditions of their communities into their regular classroom instruction. Attendees of the CMC workshops included teachers, as well as traditional musicians and dancers from Ashe, Surry, Haywood, and Caldwell counties. The recordings include discussions on lesson plans and connecting teachers with artists, as well as, performances by gospel musicians, clog dancers, square dancers, and old-time string bands.

D

Filmmaker Kenny Dalsheimer (1960-) of Durham, N.C., has made several documentaries, including Go Fast, Turn Left: Voices from Orange County Speedway (1997) and Shine On: Richard Trice and the Bull City Blues (1999). The collection consists of transcripts and videotapes from Shine On: Richard Trice and the Bull City Blues (1999) and video masters from Go Fast, Turn Left: Voices from Orange County Speedway (1997). Shine On: Richard Trice and the Bull City Blues traces the career Durham, N.C., blues musician Richard Trice. Videotapes feature interviews with Trice; trips to where he lived, worked, and performed; and footage of a 1998 blues workshop at the Hayti Heritage Center in Durham with Trice and blues musician John Dee Holeman. Go Fast, Turn Left: Voices from Orange County Speedway takes a look at the grassroots of stock car racing with interviews of drivers, family members, and track officials involved in minor league competition.
Erik Darling (1933-2008) was an American songwriter and folk music artist, born in Baltimore, Md., and raised in Canandaigua, N.Y. In the 1950s, he formed with Bob Carey and Alan Arkin what became the Tarriers. In 1956, the Tarriers' Banana Boat Song sparked a craze for calypso music. In 1958, Pete Seeger left the Weavers singing group, and Darling was asked to take his place; he stayed with that group until 1962. Darling then formed the Rooftop Singers, which popularized the 12-string guitar in its recording of Walk Right In. Darling subsequently released several solo albums, wrote many instrument instruction books, and compiled his 2008 autobiography.
Tom Davenport is an independent filmmaker and film distributor living in Delaplane, Va. He began work in film with documentary filmmakers Richard Leacock and Don Pennebacker in New York and made his first independent film in 1969. In 1970, he returned to rural Virginia and started an independent film company with his wife Mimi Davenport as co-producer and designer.
Folklorist and musician Amy Davis grew up in Millerton, N.Y., and spent several years in the Northeast, playing and recording with the Little River String Band and two Cajun bands, the Swamproots and Dirty Rice. She moved to North Carolina in 1992 and, in 1998, received her masters degree in folklore from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 1997, she conducted the Harkers Island Sacred Music Project, which documented musical traditions among the churches of the Carteret County, N.C., island. She worked in the Soutern Folklife Collection, 1999-2001.
Kevin Delaney was born in 1946 in Washington, D.C. Between 1970 and 1974 he traveled through Ireland, Scotland, and the American Midwest and Southeast, recording country, blues, gospel, bluegrass, and old-time musicians and performers who otherwise might not have been heard.
J. Taylor Doggett is a businessman and writer who has extensively researched, among various other interests, the 1950s R&B group the 5 Royales, swing bandleaders, and musicians associated with the University of North Carolina. He lives in Greensboro, N.C.
The Nancy Dols Collection consists of video recordings created by ethnomusicoligist and musician, Nancy Dols Neithammer. The recordings primarily feature old-time fiddlers Tommy Jarrell of Surry County, N.C. and Luther Davis of Grayson County, Va., including footage of Jarrell and others playing on and off stage at the 1982 Low Gap Fiddle Contest in Low Gap, N.C. and footage of Davis playing at his home outside of Galax, Va. Of particular note is the bowing lights video in which Jarrell plays in the dark with a light attached to his wrist to help illustrate his bowing technique.
Timothy Duffy (1963- ), folklorist and musician, produced field recordings of the American roots tradition as an undergraduate at Warren Wilson College and while working on a folklore master's degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A few years after graduating in 1991, he co-founded the Music Maker Relief Foundation (MMRF), a non-profit organization near Hillsborough, N.C., that helps southern roots tradition musicians meet their financial needs and gain recognition for their work.
Dynamic Legacies: Charlie Poole and the Evolution and Transmission of the Southern String Band Tradition was a symposium held on 8 April 2005 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

E

Eugene Earle was born in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, in 1926. In addition to amassing a large collection of country and western, blues, and jazz sound recordings, he also became a discographer and a founder and president of the John Edwards Memorial Foundation (JEMF). Earle is also responsible for rediscovering and recording a number of country musicians, including Doc Watson, Jimmie Tarlton, and the Carolina Tarheels.
John Edwards (1932-1960) of Sydney, Australia, was one of the first collectors of early American country music and a pioneering discographer of this music. Edwards's collection of about 2,500 rare records and tapes is now housed in the Southern Folklife Collection, Manuscripts Department, Academic Affairs Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Richard D. Eno and Janet Van Fleet are authors who worked with Edward Riley "Eddie" Boyd to write his autobiography. Boyd is a noted blues pianist. The collection consists of audiocassette interviews conducted with Eddie Boyd in creating his autobiography, transcriptions of these interviews, as well as correspondence with Boyd and others in regard to the publication of the autobiography. Acquired as part of the Southern Folklife Collection.
Author David A. Ensminger's collection contains writings, punk rock and alternative culture zines, scattered correspondence, newspaper and magazine clippings, and posters, handbills, and flyers for punk rock, oi, and hardcore music shows in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The collection also contains audio recordings of interviews that Ensminger conducted with folk and independent rock musicians.
Ralph Deward Epperson founded radio station WPAQ (740 AM) in Mount Airy, N.C. The station began broadcasting in February 1948 and was the first radio station in Surry County, N.C. On the station, Epperson promoted local musicians and the region's traditional bluegrass, old-time, and gospel music. He has been widely credited with contributing to the preservation of the music of the Blue Ridge Mountains in North Carolina and Virginia.

F

Billy Faier of Woodstock, N.Y., taught himself to play the five-string banjo and was later involved in the folk music revival as a performer, songwriter, observer, writer, and radio disc jockey. Faier was a prominent member of New York City's Washington Square folk scene in the late 1940s and of the folk music scene on both coasts during the 1950s and 1960s. The collection documents the personal and professional activities of Billy Faier. There are also more general materials collected and generated by Faier about the folk music revival, the counter-culture movement, and other interests. Included are correspondence, writings, artwork, and other materials relating to Faier's work with Pete Seeger; song writing and theatrical performances; music; Woodstock, N.Y.; juggling; games; bicycling; hitchhiking; and alternative lifestyles in general. Audio recordings include live and studio performances of Faier and other musicians; interviews with Aunt Molly Jackson and Frank and Ann Warner; recordings of Faier's radio shows; documentation of social and political events; and dubs from old records.
In 1928, George H. Fehr organized the 49ers, an old-time, cowboy, and western music group, in Salt Lake City, Utah. Other groups with which Fehr was associated included the Old Country Store, the 79ers, and the Utah Buckaroos, all of which achieved success on radio throughout the west and with live audiences across the state of Utah. Fehr sang and played a number of instruments, including the mandolin, guitar, banjo, harmonica, and Jew's harp.
Folklorist and performer Joan Fenton earned a Masters degree in folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1981. She is the owner of several stores in Charlottesville, Va., that feature traditional and contemporary handicrafts. The collection consists of sound recordings and related documentation. Sound recordings include interviews, songs, and tall tales by artists in the southern roots traditions from North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia, and Louisiana. Fenton's folklore thesis fieldwork about Howard Cotten, an African American tall tale teller in North Carolina, is represented by his songs, anecdotes, and tales about fishing and hunting that were recorded between 1976 and 1978. Also included are recordings from the 1978 John Henry Folk Festival where Hazel Dickens, Viola Clark, the Badgett Sisters, Walter Phelps, Ethel Phelps, Sparky Rucker, Pigmeat Jarrett, and Sweet Honey in the Rock performed. Interviews and sound recordings relating to Jamie Alston, Wilber Atwater, Willie Brooks, Dona Gum, Maggie Hammons, Sherman Hammons, Guy B. Johnson, Everett Lilly, Mitchell Bea Lilly, Varise Conner, Phillippe Bruneau, Carl Rutherford, and the Balfa Brothers are included. Also included are interviews with and songs of Charles Williams, a washboard player from White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., and Nat Reese, a guitarist and blues singer from Princeton, W.Va. Fenton is the primary interviewer on these recordings, some of which were made in performers' homes where she accompanied them on guitar, but there are also a few field tapes done by others, including some with the Reverend Gary Davis in Jamaica, N.Y., 1971-1972 and others done by John Cohen in New York in the 1950s. Documentation of field recordings includes transcription notes from interviews conducted by Fenton and notes compiled from the audio material.
William R. Ferris (1942- ), born and raised in Vicksburg, Miss., is an author, folklorist, filmmaker, professor, photographer, administrator, and scholar chiefly working in the areas of African American and southern culture. Among his many published works is the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, which he co-edited with Charles Reagan Wilson.
Fiddler's Grove, an old-time-music and family-oriented campground, which hosts traditional music and dance events throughout the year is owned and operated by Harper and Wanona Van Hoy in Union Grove, N.C. The Ole Time Fiddler's & Bluegrass Festival, a fiddling competition, has been held annually in the spring since Fiddler's Grove's founding in 1970, and the Square-Up, a clogging competition was held in the fall until 1982. The fiddling festival, however, traces its history in Union Grove to 1924 when Harper Van Hoy's father, H. P. Van Hoy, founded the Old Time Fiddlers Convention as a school fundraiser. The collection provides an overview of the history and operation of Fiddler's Grove, and its main entertainment events, the Ole Time Fiddler's & Bluegrass Festival and the Square-Up. The work of Harper Van Hoy and Wanona Van Hoy in building the reputation of Fiddler's Grove as a gathering place for old-time music and family entertainment is documented throughout the collection. Also documented is the split between Harper Van Hoy and his brother, J. Pierce Van Hoy, which resulted in two competing Van Hoy-operated spring fiddling events in Union Grove, 1970-1979. General correspondence, newspaper clippings, promotional material, and other items go back to the founding of the Old Time Fiddlers Convention. Festival materials include participation registration information, lists of winners, judges' notes, and correspondence, and other items. Also included are open-reel tapes, an eight-track tape, compact discs, and a videotape, all of which relate to the Ole Time Fiddler's & Bluegrass Festival.
Dom Flemons is a folk musician from Phoenix, Ariz., and a founding member, with Rhiannon Giddens and Justin Robinson, of the Carolina Chocolate Drops. The Carolina Chocolate Drops recreate and reinterpret the sound of African American string bands from the Piedmont region of the Carolinas in the 1920s and 1930s. They released their first record through Music Maker Relief Foundation in 2006. In 2010, the Carolina Chocolate Drops album Genuine Negro Jig won a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Folk Album.
Archival records and original film footage of Florentine Films and Ken Burns, documentary filmmaker, director, producer, and cinematographer. On some projects, Burns worked with Amy Stechler Burns, Stephen Ives, and others. Projects documented include: Brooklyn Bridge (1981), The Shakers (1984), Huey Long (1985), The Statue of Liberty (1985), Thomas Hart Benton (1988), The Congress (1988), The Civil War (1990), Empire of the Air (1991), Baseball (1994), Thomas Jefferson (1996), The West (1996), and Lewis & Clark (1997).
FolkScene is a syndicated music program established in 1970 featuring recorded music and in studio live performances and interviews from notable folk musicians. Based in Los Angles, the radio program is broadcast by public radio station KPFK-FM and hosted by Roz Larman, who also hosted the show with her husband, Howard Larman, until his death in 2007. The FolkScene Collection consists primarily of audio recordings, 1970-1991, of the FolkScene radio program. Notable guests featured on the recordings include Eric Andersen, Joan Baez, David Bromberg, Guy Carawan, Don McLean, Randy Newman, Odetta, Jean Ritchie, John Sebastian, Merle Travis, Tom Waits, and Peter Yarrow, among others. Other FolkScene materials found in the collection include recorded music used on the program, select outtakes and excerpts of the program, and corresponding field notes created by FolkScene staff. The collection also contains miscellaneous audio recordings, 1960-1986, not directly affiliated with the FolkScene radio program. These materials include live performances by Pete Seeger, Don McLean, Eric Bogle, Bruce "Utah" Phillips, Jean Redpath, Bessie Jones, a recording of Howard Larman hosting the radio program, P.M. Journal, on KPFK, and select corresponding field notes presumably created by FolkScene staff.
Folklore Productions is an artist management and publishing company that was founded in 1957 by Manuel "Manny" Greenhill in Boston, Mass. The company, which is now known as FLi Artists, has represented folk, traditional, and roots musicians for over 60 years. The company now operates out of California and New York, where it is managed by Manuel Greenhill's son, Mitch Greenhill.
The Folkstreams.net Collection consists of materials affiliated with Folkstreams.net, an online resource designed to disseminate documentary films about American folk culture. Produced by independent filmmakers, these films give voice to the arts and experience of diverse American groups. They are streamed on the website together with background materials that highlight the history and importance of the traditions and the films. Folkstreams.net was started in 2000 by independent filmmaker and distributor Tom Davenport in collaboration with his wife Miriam Davenport; folklorist Daniel Patterson; and a committee of filmmakers, scholars, and computer specialists. The collection consists primarily of moving image materials created and transferred between 1949 and 2015 for preservation purposes and for streaming on Folkstreams.net. The collection also includes scattered papers and born-digital materials related to Folkstreams.net and the moving image materials found in the collection.
The Full Gospel Business Men's Fellowship International (FGBMFI) is a faith-based organization created by Demos Shakarian in 1951 in an effort to merge faith in God with business practices. It is a fellowship of business people that operates in over 100 countries; there are many regional chapters throughout the United States. Materials include original audio cassette tape recordings, the majority of which were made at FGBMFI chapter meetings, conventions, and outreach efforts in North Carolina. These tapes contain sermons, music sessions, and testimonies from different people associated with the FGBMFI. Recordings of two speakers are featured. The first set is of Solomon Ono, a native of Honolulu, Hawaii, containing 22 audio cassette tapes from his sermons and testimonies, October 1974-October 1977. The second set is of the Reverend Dr. C. Paul Willis of the Cathedral of His Glory in Greensboro, N.C., containing 92 audio cassette tapes from his sermons and testimonies, February 1979-January 1992, with the bulk of the tapes recorded before 1984. There are also a small number of commercial recordings, including recorded radio programs and a series of tapes of evangelist Pat Robertson. Also included is a list of speakers, 1969-1996; showing who spoke or testified at various North Carolina FGBMFI chapter meetings, chiefly at the Durham-Chapel Hill chapter.

G

The Ken George and Jay Orr Collection consists of audio recordings, 1977, of Fred Cockerham performing old-time string band music in concert with Mike Fishback and Nowell Creadick. Cockerham, an old-time fiddle and banjo player from Low Gap, Surry County, N.C., primarily plays fiddle, while Fishback primarily plays banjo and Creadick is on guitar. The live performance was recorded by anthropologist, Ken George, and country music historian, Jay Orr, at the Ranch House restaurant in Chapel Hill, N.C. The recordings include musicians talking between songs and audience responses and applause.
The Jeff Titon and Ken George Collection consists of audio recordings, 1971-1990, of Baptist testimonies, sermons, and hymns recorded by ethnomusicologist, Jeff Titon, and anthropologist, Ken George. The majority of the recordings, 1971-1978, relate to Titon and George's scholarship on Reverend John Claymon Sherfey of Falls Church, Va. and his "folk preaching." Sherfey, who was born in Boone, N.C., began his ministry as an evangelist, preaching in revivals and on a half-hour radio program on WKIN (Kingsport, Tenn.). Sherfey later became pastor of the Fellowship Independent Baptist Church in Stanley, Va. and host of the half-hour radio ministry on WRAA (Luray, Va.). In the late 1970s both Titon and George spent time with Sherfey and his congregations, recording services, radio broadcasts, and interviews. The collection includes these recordings of worship services, prayer meetings, and Reverend Sherfey's radio broadcasts on WRAA, in Luray, Va., with hymn singing, gospel quartets, duets, songs, testimonials, sermon chanting, and Sherfey singing duets with his wife, Pauline. There are also extensive interviews with Sherfey and seventeen church members, including Reverend Belvin Hurt and an earlier recording of Reverend G. A. Cave, and recordings of several revival services led by Sherfey in Sparta, N.C. The collection also includes an audio recording, 1990, by Titon that features Baptist worship services held in the Kentucky counties of Letcher and Knott.
From the 1950s through the 1990s, collector, folklorist, and traditional music performer Alice Gerrard recorded interviews and performances of many legendary old-time and bluegrass musicians.
David R. Gessner was the assistant manager at Club 47, a folk music club in Cambridge, Mass. He runs a small independent record label, ESCA records, and lives in Sommerville, Mass.
The Carl Gilfillan Collection consists of field recordings, 1971, created and compiled by filmmaker and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill alum, Carl Gilfillan. The recordings in the collection were used as part of the soundtrack for Gilfillan's 1971 documentary film, The Struggle, which was the result of a five-year study of Cedar Branch, a socially and geographically isolated village in South Carolina's swampland. All of the field recordings in the collection feature African American congregational spirituals recorded at St. Joseph Mission Baptist Church in North Myrtle Beach, S.C. The spirituals are sung in the traditional call-and-response style. Heard between songs are testimonials from the congregation and ecstatic religious experiences.
The Goldband Recording Corporation of Lake Charles, La., has played a key role in documenting and shaping musical traditions, tastes, and trends, both regionally and on an international level since 1944, when owner Eddie Shuler made his first recording to promote his band, the Reveliers. The music of the Reveliers and other early Goldband recordings reflect Shuler's preference for the country and western music of the 1930s and 1940s. In the mid-1940s, Iry LeJune, a Cajun accordion player, made his first recording on the Goldband label, and Cajun and zydeco styles became a permanent part of Goldband's catalog. Many other musical styles were recorded at the Goldband studios, including blues, rhythm and blues, gospel, and sacred music. The early recordings were intended for a regional market, but later Goldband recordings were released nationally and internationally. Materials document the operations of the Goldband Recording Company of Lake Charles, La., and other activities of Goldband's owner and manager, Eddie Shuler, such as TEK Publishing and other business ventures. Included are business records, correspondence, publicity materials for Goldband and for individual recording artists, studio recordings and released recordings in a variety of formats, sheet music and song lyrics, photographs, and other items. Photographs include candid snapshots and publicity photographs of Eddie Shuler, musicians, and others, including many snapshots inside the Goldband Recording Studio. Business materials include Goldband and TEK manufacturing and accounting records. Correspondence documents all phases of the companies' operations; major correspondents include Don Pierce and Mike Leadbitter. Of special interest are letters and accounting items that document the popularity of Cajun music in Europe and other parts of the world. Publicity and promotional materials include photographs of Goldband recording artists, promotional copy, mailings to radio stations, lists of customers, catalogs of Goldband recordings, and reviews of Goldband releases. There are also many newspaper and magazine articles relating to Goldband, to Shuler, to recording artists who worked for Goldband, and to other Louisiana musicians. Recordings include acetates, 78s, studio recordings, and released recordings in a variety of formats. Song lyrics and music include song folios from the 1940s.
Archie Green (1917-2009) was graduated from the University of California at Berkeley in 1939 and then worked in San Francisco shipyards, served in the United States Navy in World War II, and was active in several labor organizations. He earned an M.L.S. degree from the University of Illinois and a Ph.D. in folklore from the University of Pennsylvania. Green joined the Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1960, where he was librarian and later served also as an instructor in the English Department until 1972. In 1973, Green took on a creative role at the Labor Studies Center in Washington, D.C., in part assisting with the Smithsonian Institution's Festival of American Folklife and labor participation in the Bicentennial celebrations. At the same time, he produced sound recordings, conducted fieldwork, and wrote extensively. He was active in the John Edwards Memorial Foundation and in the movement to establish the Center for American Folklife (1976). Green retired from the University of Texas at Austin in the early 1980s to San Francisco, Calif., where he continued to work collaboratively with many individuals and institutions dedicated to the study of folklore and the preservation of folklife. Archie Green died in March 2009.
The Bruce Greene and Hilary Dirlam Collection consists of audio recordings, documentation, and photographs of Anglo-American old-time musicians from western North Carolina. The materials were created and compiled by musicians, Bruce Greene and Hilary Dirlam, as part of a 1992 North Carolina Arts Council folklife documentary grant. The audio recordings primarily consist of field recordings and interviews by musicians from Avery County, Buncombe County, Mitchell County, and Yancey County, including Steve Ledford, Luke Smathers String Band, and Red Wilson.
Ken Griffis, best known for his work on documenting the Sons of the Pioneers, an early country music group, also researched and documented an earlier group known as the Beverly Hillbillies, a music group created by Glen Rice and the first hillbilly music group to achieve widespread acclaim, beginning in 1930 on radio station KMPC Los Angeles. In its most popular configuration, the group consisted of Jimmy Baker (Elton Britt), Marjorie Bauersfield (Mirandy), Harry Blaeholder (Hank Skillet), Ashley Dees (Jad Scroggins), Aleth Hansen (Lem Giles), Leo Mannes (Zeke Manners, Zeke Craddock), Cyprian Paulette (Ezra Longnecker), and Charles Quirk (Charlie Slater, Charlie Skillet).
Interviews conducted by author and historian, Pamela Grundy, for her research project on the Crazy Water Crystals Company, who from 1933 to 1937 sponsored radio programs featuring many North Carolina and South Carolina musicians. The sponsored radio programs primarily featured hillbilly and country music and were broadcast on stations throughout the region, including WBT-Charlotte, WWNC-Asheville, and WSB-Atlanta. Interviewees featured on the audio recordings include Zeke Morris, a musician who played for the J.E. Mainer's Crazy Mountaineers and later Wade Mainer's Sons of the Mountaineers, and his brother Wiley Morris, who performed with Zeke on the radio for many years. Also included is an interview with Homer Pappy Sherril, who was born in Hickory, N.C. and is best known for his long collaboration with banjoist Snuffy Jenkins on WIS in Columbia, S.C. The collection also contains corresponding transcripts for the 3 interviews.
The Philip F. Gura Collection consists of audio recordings, pictures, songbooks, and other printed items compiled by historian and musician, Philip F. Gura. The audio recordings, 1975-2001, consist primarily of live recordings of old-time music festivals and conventions, including the Appalachian String Band Festival in Clifftop. W.Va., Fries Fiddler's Convention in Fries, Va., Galax Fiddler's Convention in Galax, Va., Grayson County Fiddler's Convention in Grayson County, Va., and the Mt. Airy Fiddler's Convention in Mt. Airy, N.C., among others. Notable musicians featured on the live recordings include Andrew Cahan, Alice Gerrard, Tommy Jarrell, Mike Seeger, as well as Philip F. Gura and his son, David Gura. Other recordings include live recordings of workshops, dubbed field recordings, private releases, and interviews conducted by Philip F. Gura. Interviewees featured on the recordings include the New Lost City Ramblers, as well as musician and folklorist, Alan Jabbour. The colleciton also includes facsimiles of pictures and illustrations used by Philip F. Gura for his publications America's Instrument: The Banjo in the Nineteenth Century (Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 1999) and C.F. Martin and His Guitars, 1796-1873 (Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 2003). The pictures appear to be sourced from printed materials and consist primarily of illustrations of banjos, guitars, musicians, music stores, and instrument manufacturers.
Peter Guralnick (1943-) is an author of fiction, screenplays, music criticism, biographies, and nonfiction anthologies about American roots and popular music. Guralnick was born in Boston, Mass., and earned a B.A. (1960s) and M.A. in Creative Writing (1971) from Boston University. Published books include short story collections Almost Grown (1964) and Mister Downchild (1967); nonfiction works Feel Like Going Home: Portraits in Blues and Rock 'n' Roll (1971), Lost Highway: Journeys and Arrivals of American Musicians (1979), and Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom (1986); and the biographies Last Train to Memphis: The Rise of Elvis Presley (1994), Careless Love: The Unmaking of Elvis Presley (1999), and Dream Boogie: The Triumph of Sam Cooke (2005).

H

Country musician and native North Carolinian George Hamilton IV was born on 19 July 1937. In 1956, while a student at the University of North Carolina, Hamilton recorded the song A Rose and a Baby Ruth for Colonial Records, a local label. From that recording, Hamilton went on make the transition to country music. He soon became a mainstay at the Grand Ole Opry and, through his work abroad, eventually became known as the International Ambassador of Country Music.
The Charlotte Folk Music Society Collection consists of audio recordings, 1982-1986, created and compiled by historian and radio host, Tom Hanchett, at Charlotte's WFAE public radio station. The collection includes programs from three radio series: The Blues Show, An American Almanac, and An American Almanac: Live in the Studio. The Blues Show was a thematic one-hour program that introduced viewers to blues music through such subjects and figures as Piedmont blues, jump blues, Blind Boy Fuller, and Rev. Gary Davis, among others. An American Almanac was a thematic program featuring artists who recorded in Charlotte, N.C. between the years 1927-1945. Subjects of the show included the Blue Sky Boys, the Delmore Brothers, Fiddlin' Arthur Smith, the Mainer family, the Carter Family, the Morris Brothers, and Jimmie Davis. An American Almanac featured recordings from reissues available on LP, recordings of covers by modern performers, and new recordings by featured artists, with commentary by Hanchett. An American Almanac: Live in the Studio consisted of edited performances and interviews with folk musicians, including nationally-known artists, Charlotte natives, and living room pickers. Artists featured in this program included David Holt, Si Kahn, Cathy Fink, Rory Block, Claude Caset, Don White, Whitey and Hogan, Nappy Brown, Dot and Chester Lorenz, The Down Home Folks, and the Slop Jar Serenaders.
The Peter Hartman Collection consists of audio recordings, 1963-1974, collected by folklorist, banjo player and businessman, Peter (Pete) Hartman, while he was an undergraduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The recordings primarily feature performances of Anglo-American Primitive Baptist hymns, interviews, and field recordings from the Blue Ridge Mountains region of Virginia. Topics discussed in these recordings include stories about the origins and functions of particular hymns, as well as anecdotes on Primitive Baptist preachers and singing schools. The collection also contains field recordings, 1974, of both Anglo-American and African American Primitive Baptist worship services that feature lined-out hymns, preaching, and prayers. Interviewees and subjects from the recordings include Guy Phillips and Oscar Harris, Anglo-American Primitive Baptists; the Anglo-American congregation of the Old Republican Primitive Baptist Church; A. C. Holloway (male) and Ollie Shively (female), Anglo-American Primitive Baptists from Sparta, N.C.; Elder William Holland, Anglo-American Primitive Baptist from Rocky Mount, Va., and the African American congregation of the Rockfield Primitive Baptist Church in Franklin County, Va. The collection also includes dubbed field recordings, 1963-1973, made at Primitive Baptist meeting houses in North Carolina, Virginia, Texas, Maryland, and Louisiana. These dubbed recordings were originally collected by Frank Simpkins of Roanoke, Va.
While working on her M.A. in Folklore from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Jill Hemming received a Documentation Project Grant from the Folklife Section of the North Carolina Arts Council to document and photograph quilts crafted by women of the Waccamaw Siouan Tribe of North Carolina. Hemming conducted the survey of Waccamaw Siouan quilts in Columbus and Bladen counties, N.C., 1994-1995. Each quilt is documented on a form with corresponding visual representation on color slides. As far as possible, each quilt is identified by quilt owner; the quilt maker; the quilt maker's spouse, children, and parents; the quilter (if different than the quilt maker); and the materials, dimensions, and pattern of the quilt. The quilts of Elizabeth Graham Jacobs (Lee) are particularly well represented. The oldest quilt documented was made circa 1919. The rest range from the 1940s to the 1990s.
Myles Horton founded the Highlander Folk School in 1932 as an adult education institution based on the principle of empowerment. Horton and other School members worked towards mobilizing labor unions in the 1930s and Citizenship Schools during the civil rights movement beginning in the late 1950s. They worked with Martin Luther King, Jr., the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Guy and Candie Carawan, Septima Clark, and Rosa Parks, among others. In 1959, the School was investigated for Communist activities and confiscation by the state of Tennessee. Soon after, its buildings mysteriously burned to the ground. The Highlander Folk School was re-chartered in 1971 as the Highlander Research and Education Center near Knoxville, Tenn. The collection includes acetate and transcription discs documenting the struggle for justice through political and social activism. Recordings of folk music, protest songs, labor songs, and African American religious songs were a large part of this movement and appear here. Acetate discs contain radio programs, recorded songs, and voices of leaders from the civil rights movement, including Esau Jenkins, Septima Clark, Rosa Parks, Miles Horton, and Zilphia Horton. Electrical transcription discs contain a variety of radio programs on issues related to the work at the Highlander Folk School.
Hillbilly Sources and Symbols: Country Music, Cultural Brokerage, and O Brother, Where Art Thou? was a conference held on 4-5 April 2003 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The conference, sponsored by the Southern Folklife Collection, the Center for the Study of the American South (CSAS), and Music in Context, was a response to the surge in popularity of traditional music inspired by the film O Brother, Where Art Thou? and a celebration of the publication of Country Music Sources: A Biblio-Discography of Commercially Recorded Traditional Country Music by Guthrie T. Meade Jr. with Douglas S. Meade and Richard K. Spottswood (Southern Folklife Collection, 2002).
Anthropology professor Glenn Hinson of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has focused this research on the music, language, and belief systems of African American communities.
The Fred Hoeptner Collection consists of an audio recording compiled by Fred Hoeptner, an environmental engineer, ragtime composer, and founding member of the John Edwards Memorial Foundation. The recording includes an interview that Hoeptner conducted with Mrs. Hila E. Weathers, sister of American folk singer, Goebel Reeves (1899-1959). Known as "the Texas Drifter," Reeves was an Anglo-American performer of cowboy, hobo, and western songs. In the recording Weathers discusses her brother's musical career as well as their upbringing in Sherman, Tex., among other topics. The recording also includes an interview with Anglo-American steel guitarist, Leon McAuliffe, being interviewed by his manager, G. Don Thompson. In the interview McAuliffe and Thompson discuss McAuliffe's career and influences, the history of the steel guitar, and other steel guitarists, including James Robert "Bob" Wills (1905-1975), an Anglo-American western swing musician, songwriter, and bandleader from Texas.
Multi-instrumentalist and Grammy Award winner David Holt was born in Gatesville, Tex., in 1946. After graduating from the University of California at Santa Barbara, Holt began collecting Appalachian music and stories in the southeastern mountains. A historian of Appalachian music and culture, Holt began performing his collected music and stories in the early 1970s. In the mid-1970s, Holt founded the Appalachian Music Program at Warren Wilson College in Swannanoa, N.C. In the early 1980s, Holt resigned from Warren Wilson and began touring fulltime, performing his music and stories at festivals around the world and on various TNN, the Nashville Network, and North Carolina PBS television shows. In the late 1990s, Holt and Doc Watson began working together to create Legacy, an album that features them in conversation and in song.
The Mike Hortig and Heinz Kratochwill Collection consists of field recordings and photographs of American blues musicians from 1981. Austrian boogie-woogie and blues pianist, Mike Hortig, compiled the materials with his friend, Heinz Kratochwill, during a four-week-long trip to the American South. The audio recordings and photographs capture blues pianists and guitarists, including Trenton Cooper, James "Son" Thomas, Boogie Bill Webb, Mott Willis, Sam Chatmon, and others. Also included in the collection is a handwritten track listing found with one of the field recordings.
John T. Huddle was a lawyer, a clawhammer banjo player, and old-time music aficionado of Lancaster, Ohio.
Ed Huey is a retired music educator who was twice honored by the Tennessee Governor's School for the Arts as an Outstanding Music Educator. A Lyndhurst Foundation Grant Recipient, Huey gathered field recordings of Mississippi Bluesmen, Jack Owens, Bud Spires, Jimmy Duck Holmes, Jacob Stuckey, and A. B. Granderson. Huey performs and teaches American Roots Music, specializing in early Blues guitar and harmonica styles. His highly interactive sets include Work Songs, Field Hollers, Hambone, Piedmont Blues, Delta Blues, Texas Blues, Jug Band, Hokum, and railroad songs. Huey plays guitar, slide guitar, harmonica, mandolin, washboard, spoons, and jug. Huey also teaches harmonica at the Folk School of Chattanooga.

J

James Jordan's wife was a member of the Weatherman family, and her ancestors appear to have been plantation owners in North Carolina (location unknown). The collection includes six audiocassettes, ca. 1970s, of James Jordan and his wife singing ballads, folk songs, children's songs, and spirituals, individually and in duet. Some of the songs were passed down through their families; others the two learned as children. According to Jordan, the spirituals were originally learned from slaves on the Weatherman family plantation in North Carolina. After each song, the family of origin is identified.
The Phil Jamison Collection consists of video recordings, audio recordings, and printed materials created by Phil Jamison for the North Carolina Arts Council Folklife Program-funded documentary project Western North Carolina: Buckdancers, Flatfoot Dancers and Charleston Dancers. The project documented the lives and dancing of buckdancers, flatfoot dancers, and Charleston dancers from several counties in western North Carolina, including Buncombe County, Henderson County, Swain County, Yancey County, Clay County, Jackson County, Burke County, Haywood County, Watauga County, and Madison County. Jamison collected the materials during 1992 and 1993; the project was completed in 1993. The video recordings are on Hi8 and VHS and consist of shots of dancers demonstrating dances to live music, descriptions of steps, and interviews with the dancers. Dances documented include the Hambone, the Turkey Trot, the Two-Step, the Charleston, and the Chicken. The video log documents the dancer's name, the dance style, the accompanying music, and the date of the performance recorded. The audio recordings are on audiocassette and consist of oral history interviews with twelve dancers. Of particular interest are the performances of L. C. King and John Reeves, who were featured in Mike Seeger's 1987 documentary film Talking Feet.
Michael Jarrett is professor of English at Penn State University, York. He is the author of Drifting on a Read: Jazz as a Model for Writing, Sound Tracks: A Musical ABC, and Producing Country: The Inside Story of the Great Recordings.
The John Edwards Memorial Foundation, which operated 1962-1983, was located at the University of Calif. at Los Angeles. The foundation's goal was to promote the study of twentieth-century American folk music. In 1983, the Foundation was dissolved, and a successor organization, the John Edwards Memorial Forum, was established.
Kenneth M. Johnson (1928-) of Randolph County, N.C., along with his father Jesse (Pa), mother Lydia (Ma), sister Betty, and twin brothers Bob and Jim, formed the gospel and popular music singing group the Johnson Family Singers. The collection includes radio scripts, sound recordings, and video recordings documenting the musical careers of the Johnson Family Singers and Betty Johnson. Radio scripts include 158 scripts from WBT radio shows in Charlotte, N.C., 1943-1965, in which the Johnson Family Singers performed. Sound recordings include non-commercial recordings on acetate and transcription discs, as well as commercial 45s, 78s, LPs, and compact discs. Transcription discs record the Johnsons' appearances on WBT and Larry Walker's performances on the Margaret Ann Show. 45 rpm records, 78 rpm records, and LP records contain original commercial releases by the Johnson Family Singers, Betty Johnson, and the Stumphole Trio. Compact discs include a release of radio performances by the Johnsons that accompanied Kenneth Johnson's The Johnson Family Singers: We Sang For Our Supper (1997). Video recordings document several of Betty Johnson's appearances on Eddy Arnold Time and the Johnson Family Singers' Ed Sullivan Show performances.
Betty Johnson was born on 16 March 1929 in Guilford County, N.C. As a child, Johnson traveled throughout the South as a member of the Johnson Family Singers, a gospel and popular music group. Betty Johnson's solo career as a pop-standard and cabaret singer took off in 1954 when she joined the Csida-Grean management company. Throughout the 1950s, Johnson recorded songs, appeared on Don McNeill's Breakfast Club radio show, and performed on various television shows. From 1957 to 1962 she was a cast member of Jack Parr's Tonight Show in New York, N.Y. Betty Johnson stopped performing in 1964 when she married New York City investment banker Arthur Gray Jr. and moved to New Hampshire. In 1993, Johnson re-entered show business with a cabaret act at The Oak Room at The Algonquin Hotel in New York. In the mid-1990s, she launched her own record label, Bliss Tavern Records, based in Haverhill, N.H., which distributes new and re-released records by Betty Johnson, her daughters Lydia and Elizabeth Gray, and the Johnson Family Singers.
The Joines Family Collection consists of live audio recordings featuring John E. Frail Joines (1914- ), an Anglo-American traditional storyteller from Moravian Falls, Wilkes County, N.C. Joines' son, Jerry Dale Joines, and daughter, Joyce Joines Newman, compiled these oral history recordings, 1971-1979, which feature their father sharing tall tales, stories from World War II, hunting tales, religious narratives, local anecdotes, ballads, and songs. Jim Jennings (1928- ), an Anglo-American storyteller who has learned from Joines, is included in a few of the recordings performing tales he learned from Joines. John E. Joines was featured in the 1981 documentary film, Being A Joines: A Life in the Brushy Mountains, by Tom Davenport, Allen Tullos, Joyce Joines Newman, and Daniel Patterson.

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Scholar and folklorist, Ed Kahn (1938-2004) spent much of his life devoted to the study of American folk songs and early country music, conducting extensive field research and writing at length about both Merle Travis and the Carter Family. Kahn was was involved in the creation of the John Edwards Memorial Foundation (JEMF), along with Archie Green, D. K. Wilgus, Fred Hoeptner, and Eugene Earle. He was initially appointed Executive Secretary of the JEMF and was instrumental in starting the JEMF Quarterly newsletter.
North Carolina folklorist Nancy Kalow taught documentary video production at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies. She received an A.B. degree from Harvard University in 1982 and an M.A. in folklore from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1999. She directed the 1988 documentary Sadobabies: Runaways in San Francisco and was a Rockefeller Foundation Fellow, 2003-2004, at the University of North Carolina's University Center for International Studies in Chapel Hill.
The Wayne Martin and Nancy Kalow Collection consists of video recordings and related paper materials, 1987, made by North Carolina folklorist, fiddler, and arts administrator, Wayne Martin, in collaboration with folklorist and videographer, Nancy Kalow. Martin and Kalow received a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council in 1987 to document traditional fiddlers from North Carolina. The grant, titled, Hand Down the Fiddle and Bow: Documentation of Traditional North Carolina Fiddling, allowed Martin and Kalow to preserve and identify traditional fiddle music through a statewide videotaping project. Martin acted as the project director, interviewer, and occasional backup accompaniment, while Kalow acted as the videographer and editor. The goal of the project was to capture the subject's stylistic techniques, including bowing, fingering, and positioning on the instrument, while also capturing oral histories regarding the subject's biography, family, and community traditions. The collection includes the edited videos that were created as part of the project, as well as the original grant application, tape logs, and related paper materials. Fiddlers documented on videotape by Martin and Kalow for the project include Jess Albertson of Beulaville, Duplin County, N.C.; Lonnie Austin (1905-) of North Carolina; Clennie Davis of Jacksonville, Onslow County, N.C.; Earnest East of Mt. Airy, Surry County, N.C.; Harvey Ellington of Berea, Granville County, N.C.; Benton Flippen of Mt. Airy, N.C.; Tommy Hunter (1919-1993) of Mars Hill, Madison County, N.C.; Ben King of Sneads Ferry, Onslow County, N.C.; Smith McInnis of Raeford, Hoke County, N.C.; Walt Probst of Buffalo Creek, N.C.; C.L. Scott of Morehead City, Carteret County, N.C.; Lauchlin Nordan (L.N.) Shaw (1912-2000) of Anderson Creek Township, Harnett County, N.C.; Homer Lee Pappy Sherrill of Sherrills Ford, Catawba County, N.C.; Melvin Slaydon of Zephyr, Surry County, N.C.; Luke Smathers of Canton, Haywood County, N.C.; Joe Thompson (1918-2012) and Odell Thompson (1911-1994) of Mebane, Alamance County, N.C.; Doug Wallin (1919-2000) of Madison County, N.C.; and Otho Willard of Williamston, Martin County, N.C.
Folklorist Ann Kaplan was born in 1972 in Washington D.C. She earned an M.A. in folklore from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2000. She has worked with the Southern Oral History Program, as an independent folklorist with diverse communities in North Carolina, and as director of the Orange County Arts Commission in Hillsborough, N.C. The Herring Run Folklife Project, funded by a folklife documentation grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, documents farming and fishing in Bertie County, N.C., through oral history interviews with residents and photographic slides. Audiocassettes consist of oral history interviews conducted by Ann Kaplan with residents in Bertie County, N.C., in which interviewees describe their lives farming and fishing. The interviews are accompanied by a description of the Herring Run Folklife Project and abstracts of the interviews. Slides contain images of Bertie County, N.C., including farmland; roadsides; boardwalks; fishermen at work; fishing nets; bait shops; interior shots of workers pickling, canning, and packaging fish at the Perry-Wynns Fish Corporation; fish markets; cafes; exterior shots of the Indian Woods Baptist Church; and an Indian Woods congregation fish fry.
The Ken Kenkel Collection consists of interviews and recorded performances created and compiled by Kenneth (Ken) Russell Kenkel for his 1986 master's thesis in folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The collection includes an interview with Bobby McMillon, Anglo-American singer and storyteller, of Lenoir, N.C., about his traditional music and storytelling; an interview with Virginia Sykes Perry, Anglo-American of Orange County, N.C., about the folk house (I-house) she grew up in; a recording of Lauchlin Shaw, Anglo-American old-time fiddler, of Harnett County, N.C., playing old-time fiddle with an accompanying string band for the radio broadcast-CCTV Folklife Radio Series; a recording of a live concert of Frank Proffitt, Jr., Anglo-American singer and musician, of Morganton, N.C., playing old- time music on the banjo and dulcimer and singing; and interviews with Proffitt about his musicianship. Copies of Kenkel's thesis, titled, Frank Proffitt, Jr., and Bobby McMillon: traditional artists in the public eye, reside at the Davis Library and within the North Carolina Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill.
Gary Kenton is a music critic, editor, and teacher of Greensboro, N.C. The collection consists of interviews conducted or collected, 1971-1989, by Kenton with music industry executive and founder of Folkways Records Moses Asch, his family members, and his business associates, many of whom were important figures in folk music and in the folk revival movement. Included in this group are folksingers Elizabeth Cotten, Jean Ritchie, and Pete Seeger, and Harry Smith, compiler of the Anthology of American Folk Music. Interviews are largely focused on Asch's life and work.
The Mark Klempner Collection consists of audio recordings, 1974-1989, created by folklorist, historian, and folk musician, Mark Klempner. From 1982 to 1992 Klempner performed under the stage name of Jamie Michaels in Los Angeles, Calif. During this time he recorded with audio engineer, Henry Lewy, and with vocalists, David Lasley, Arnold McCuller, and Rosemary Butler. The collection includes recordings, 1987-1988, from these studio sessions as well as earlier live recordings, 1974-1982, of Klempner performing in concert as Mark Klempner. The collection also contains miscellaneous recordings, 1980-1982, including an interview that Klempner conducted with Scottish musician, Robin Williamson.
Franz Kunst worked for the Southern Folklife Collection, 1999-2000. He was program director of radio station WXYC at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1993-2002.

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Here and There/Aqui y Alla was an exhibit of Latin American women's textiles in North Carolina presented at the 1996 Festival for the Eno in Durham, N.C. Kelly Feltault coordinated both the preliminary fieldwork and the presentation of the exhibit with contract assistance provided by Leila Childs, Kate (Kathryn) Hanser, and Ann Kaplan, all graduate students in the Folklore Curriculum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Textile work exhibited included crocheted doilies, afghans, table cloths, and baby clothes; embroidered dresses, blouses, and head sashes; cross-stitched tortilla wraps and pillowcases for newlyweds; knitted sweaters; woven skirts from Guatemala; girl's dresses sewn without a pattern; hand hooked bags; and calado. The fieldwork and exhibit material focuses on the work, skills, and life experiences of eight Latin American textile artists: Manuela Avila Morales (Guatemala), Elvira Garcia (Mexico), Nazaria Munoz Joaquin (Mexico), and Ereneida Duarte Ocampo (Mexico) in Siler City, N.C.; Juana Pascual (Guatemala) and Agustina Lopez (Guatemala) in Morganton, N.C.; Octavia Mendoza (Mexico) in Kernersville, N.C.; and Gloria Munoz (Mexico) in Winston-Salem, N.C. Exhibit materials include text for the explanatory panels for the exhibit and copies of the printed publications associated with the exhibit and the Festival for the Eno. Some of this material is in Spanish. Photographs include portraits of artists, examples of their work, and the documentation of the actual exhibit. Audio tapes are fieldwork interviews with the artists conducted in Spanish with the assistance of a translator. Tapelogs are also included.
Barbara Lau (1958- ), folklorist and program coordinator, has studied African-American shape-note singing groups in the midwest, coordinated the 1983 Shape-Note Singing Reunion in St. Louis, Mo., and documented the 1983 and 1984 Ohio-Indiana-Michigan Vocal Singing Conventions. While doing graduate work in folklore at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Lau worked with a Cambodian community in Greensboro, N.C., through the Greensboro Buddhist Center. In 1999, she became the community-based documentary programs coordinator at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.
Leland Ledgerwood's father, William Lafayette Ledgerwood, was born in Grainger County, Tenn., in 1889. He left Tennessee to work in the coal mines of Virginia, but soon moved to Ohio, where he married Gladys Jane Allen in 1915. In 1916, Ledgerwood formed the string band Ledgerwood's Tennessee Fiddlers with his wife, brother Fred, Bill James, and Gerald Flynn. The group performed in and around Warren, Ohio, during the late 1920s. The band eventually included some of Gladys and William Ledgerwood's children, as well as West Virginia fiddler Mack McGraw, who played with the band from the early 1930s to 1937. The band continued to perform throughout northeastern Ohio until the late 1930s or early 1940s. Both William and Gladys Ledgerwood died in Warren in 1962. Fred Ledgerwood died in Warren in 1965.
Ron Liberti (1967-) was born in Passaic, N.J. Between 1985 and 1990, he studied fine arts and film at Montclair State University in Montclair, N.J., and printmaking at Brighton Polytechnic in Brighton, U.K. Liberti moved to Chapel Hill, N.C., in 1991, where he participated in the local music scene as a musician; head of a record label; and a poster artist, working chiefly with screen printing.
Art and architectural historian M. Ruth Little (1946-) of Raleigh, N.C., was the principal investigator on the NEH-funded North Carolina Cemetery as Cultural Artifact Project, 1981-1982, directed by Terry Zug of the Curriculum in Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Project supported Little's 1984 doctoral dissertation, later published as Sticks and Stones: Three Centuries of North Carolina Gravemarkers (UNC Press, 1998). The collection includes survey information, photographs, and other materials relating to the Project, which focused on photographic documentation, recording, and cataloging of cemeteries in three North Carolina counties: Cumberland, Davidson, and New Hanover. Other counties were added for comparison. Intended to link demographic and cultural traits with regional practices, one of the Project's primary focus points was to identify gravemarker artisans and carvers throughout the region and to trace their movements within, and influences over, the carving tradition. Included are master cards with cemetery survey information and topographical maps used in the research and identification process. Photographic materials include black and white prints, negatives, and color slides, many of which are of cemeteries or gravemarkers. Also included are research notes; keysort cards; grant materials; audiotapes of an interview with gravestone carver J. Thomas McLean of Lincolnton, N.C.; and other items.
Eleanor R. Long-Wilgus was born in 1923 in Seattle, Wash. She received her Ph.D. in English Literature and Folklore from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1968. Long-Wilgus moved to Chapel Hill, N.C., in 1993 shortly after the death of her husband, D. K. Wilgus, folklorist and professor of English and Anglo-American Folksong in the Department of Folklore and Mythology at UCLA. In Chapel Hill, she became an active member of the local folklore community and established the D. K. Wilgus Fellowship in Comparative Ballad and Folksong Study in the Curriculum in Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Long-Wilgus died in May 2005 in Chapel Hill.
Jason Lonon is a graphic artist and musician who grew up near Los Angeles, Calif., before moving with his family to Burlington, N.C., in 1989. After four years and two combat deployments with the United States Marines, Lonon attended the School of Communication Arts in Raleigh, N.C., graduating with a technical degree in 3D modeling and animation. In 2002 he helped form the Greensboro, N.C., based rockabilly band The Tremors. In 2005, Lonon founded Death-Ray Design, a graphic design company through which he publishes posters, clothing, and other promotional printed items.
The Kip Lornell Collection consists of audio recordings, 1932-1976, created and compiled by ethnomusicologist, Christopher Kip Lornell, while he was a graduate student of Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The recordings are primarily field tapes featuring performances and interviews with African American blues and pre-blues secular musicians from North Carolina. Music performed includes blues, old-time songs and tunes, boogie-woogie, and gospel songs, played on banjo, guitar, and piano. Performers featured in the field recordings include Jamie Alston, Wilbert Atwater, Pernell Charity, George Letlow, Arthur Lyons, Lesley Riddle, Dink Roberts, John Snipes, Leo Strowd, Joe Thompson (1918- ), Odell Thompson (1911- ), Willy Trice (1910-1976), and Clarence Tross (1884-1977). Also included in the collection are an interview with Guy B. Johnson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill sociologist who studied African American musical traditions; interviews with the Chapel Hillbillies, an African American string band in the 1920s and 1930s; a lecture on folk medicine by Wilbert C. Jordan, medical doctor and sixth generation voodoo priest; a re-recording of Primitive Baptist singing by Elder Golden Harris and others, ca. 1932; and performances by Anglo-American fiddler and hammered dulcimer player Virgil Craven (1902-1980).
John D. Loudermilk started his music career in his native North Carolina under the pseudonym Johnny Dee. After reassuming his birth name and moving to Nashville, Tenn., his commercial success as a songwriter for Acuff-Rose Publications earned him a spot in the Nashville Songwriters Association International's Hall of Fame. In addition to maintaining his songwriting career, Loudermilk also actively supported folk and country music through his participation in folk festivals, his involvement with the Southern Folk Cultural Revival Project, and his role as producer of a 1980 album by Chet Atkins and Doc Watson.
The Peter B. Lowry Collection consists of field recordings, studio recordings, and interviews created and compiled by folklorist, record producer, and ethnomusicologist, Peter B. Lowry. The original deposit consists of field recordings, 1972, of a medicine show at the Chatham County Fair in Pittsboro, N.C. on 16 September 1972. These audio recordings feature Peg Leg Sam, born Arthur Jackson, an African American harmonica player, singer, and comedian from Jonesville, S.C., and Chief Thundercloud, born Leo Kahdot, a Native American medicine show pitch man from Oklahoma. The Addition of 2016 consists of field recordings, studio recordings, and interviews that primarily feature Piedmont blues from North Carolina and the southeastern United States. Notable blues musicians featured on the recordings include Pink Anderson, Floyd "Dipper" Council, Honeyboy Edwards, Arthur Jackson, Homesick James, Eddie Kirkland, Robert Jr. Lockwood, Dink Roberts, Guitar Shorty, Richard Trice, and Willie Trice. The Addition of 2016 also contains documentation found with select recordings, including inventories, tape logs, track listings, and memos. The Addition of 2017 consists of audio recordings, 1972-1973, and documentation related to Flyright Record releases.
The Bascom Lamar Lunsford Family Collection consists of 14 studio and field recordings, 1935-1972, created or compiled by the North Carolina lawyer, folklorist, performer and festival promoter, Bascom Lamar Lunsford (1882-1973), and his family. The majority of these tapes are part of Bascom Lamar Lunsford's personal memory collection of folks songs, which he made in collaboration with Columbia University in 1935. With the help of George W. Hibbett, a professor in the English Department at Columbia, and recording engineer, Walter C. Garwick, Lunsford recorded more than three hundred mountain songs, folk ballads, folk readings, poetry, spirituals, and folk games that he had personally collected over several decades in the mountains of southern Appalachia. Over a series of 10 reels, Lunsford sings, plays fiddle, banjo, and guitar, recites poetry, tells jokes and stories, reads sermons and speeches, and gives detailed background information for each recorded track. The Bascom Lamar Lunsford Family Collection also includes 4 recordings, circa 1970-1972, compiled by Lunsford's daughter, Kern Lunsford. These recordings include dubs of previous recordings as well as field recordings of North Carolina based gospel singers and country-western singers, including recordings of Reverend W. S. Woody (b. 1885), an Anglo-American old-time Baptist preacher from Spruce Pine, N.C., singing sacred songs, and recordings of Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Boone and Evelyn Boone, country-western and gospel singers, from Green Mountain, N.C., singing country-western and gospel songs.

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The Bill C. Malone Collection documents the culture, history, and performers of country music, folk, bluegrass, gospel, and other related music genres and topics. Materials include audio and video recordings compiled by Bill C. Malone, historian of country music; newspaper clippings, articles from scholarly, trade, and popular publications, Malone's notes, and photographs. Audio recordings consists of interviews with Bill C. Malone, public and class lectures given by Malone, research materials compiled by Malone, and episodes of Malone's weekly radio program, Back to the Country.
The Bill Mansfield Collection consists of audio and video recordings created by the North Carolina based folklorist and musician, Bill Mansfield. The majority of the collection consists of 11 field recordings, 1990-1992, that Mansfield conducted for his master's thesis on North Carolina based tobacco auctioneers, while studying folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. These field recordings feature auctioneers, tobacco graders, farmers, buyers, and warehouse employees speaking in various industrial environments. The collection also includes 1 video recording, 1988, featuring a community-based music party that includes footage of clogging and in-context rabbit dancing.
The Susan Massengale collection consists of 243 videotapes from four documentary productions, 1987-1995. Massengale co-produced and co-directed one of the productions, Step It Up and Go: Blues in the Carolinas, with Glen Hinson. The other productions are Boogie in Black and White, a film about the Cherokee Indians, and another film about Black Mountain College. Massengale's connection to these three documentaries is unclear, but they appear to related to UNC-TV and are chiefly about North Carolina. Videotape formats include Betacam, Umatic, and VHS. Step It Up and Go: Blues in the Carolinas traces the development of blues music in the Carolinas through interviews with musicians and still photographs of them. North Carolina musicians talk about how they learned to play and perform different styles on the banjo, fiddle, guitar, piano, bottle, and spoons. Performers include Odell Thompson, Nate Thompson, Joe Thompson, Etta Baker, Cora Phillips, Junior Thomas, Thomas Burt, Guitar Slim, Moses Roscoe, and Anthony Pough. The UNC-TV documentary Boogie in Black and White is a film about the making of Pitch a Boogie Woogie, a film shot in Greenville, N.C., in 1947 by John W. Warner, then owner of Greenville's Plaza Theatre. Pitch a Boogie Woogie, released by Lord-Warner Pictures, Inc., in 1948, was the first movie made by a production company based in North Carolina. It had an all-African American cast of mostly local Greenville musicians and actors and enjoyed success in the Carolinas, but was never shown outside that area. The Cherokee Indian production appears to be mostly about Joyce Dugan, who was elected Principal Chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in 1995. She was the first woman to hold that position. The Black Mountain College production appears to be about the history of Black Mountain College in Black Mountain, N.C. Black Mountain College was founded in 1933 and guided by the principle that the study of art was central to a liberal arts education. Black Mountain College closed in 1957.
The David Massengill Collection consists of audiovisual materials and papers created and compiled by American folk singer-songwriter, David Massengill. Audiovisual materials consist primarily of sound recordings of studio masters and live performances by Massengill, including masters for the releases Coming Up For Air (1992) and The Return (1995). Papers consist of original manuscripts, promotional headshots of Massengill, and handmade flyers, cards, and books by Massengill.
Stephen Matchak was a professor of geography at Salem State College in Salem, Mass. Matchak received his M.A. in 1978 from the Curriculum in Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he wrote his thesis, The Wildfowl Decoy in North Carolina and Back Bay, Virginia. Matchak also published a related article in Arts in Earnest: North Carolina Folklife in 1989. He went on to receive his Ph.D. in 1982 from the Department of Geography at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he completed his dissertation Folk Houses of the Northeast.
McCabe's Guitar Shop is a musical instrument store and live music venue in Santa Monica, Calif. The McCabe's Guitar Shop Collection consists primarily of audio recordings, 1967-2008, of live concerts at McCabe's Guitar Shop, including performances by Elizabeth Cotten, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, John Fahey, John Hammond, Bill Monroe, Odetta, Jean Ritchie, Mike Seeger, Ralph Stanley, Merle Travis, Dave Van Ronk, Townes Van Zandt, Doc Watson, Merle Watson, and Kate Wolf, among others. The collection also contains video recordings, including a live performance, 1980, by John McEuen at McCabe's and a video interview, circa 1984, featuring Elizabeth Cotten and her family members. Other materials in the collection include discontinuous newsletter and concert calendars, 1976-2013, created by McCabe's to promote the store's concert series, products, and classes, as well as a newspaper clipping, 1984, and correspondence, circa 1980.
Born in Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada, in 1943, Elizabeth Drake McDonald grew up in British Columbia's southern interior and taught school on the north coast. The collection centers around Elizabeth Drake McDonald's in-depth study and compilation of the lyrics of songwriter and musician Bob Nolan, who is best known for his work with the singing cowboy group, the Sons of the Pioneers. He penned many trademark songs of the cowboy song genre, including Tumbling Tumbleweeds, Cool Water, and Way Out There. McDonald has transcribed nearly 200 of Nolan's songs into a self-published book, Lyrics: The Song Poems of Bob Nolan. Paul Lawrence Hopper worked with McDonald on the project, writing annotations to Nolan's song lyrics. Hopper also self-published a companion volume, Bob Nolan: A Biographical Guide and Annotations to the Lyric Archive, which contains transcription recording information and a filmography for the Sons of the Pioneers and is included in the collection. Also included is material McDonald gathered during conversations with Nolan's daughter, Roberta Nolan Mileusnich, and his grandson, Calin Coburn. Mileusnich provided McDonald with lyrics from unreleased recordings, which are compiled in Bob Nolan, Volume Two: The Last Song Poems. Calin Coburn donated 274 high-quality scans of documents, letters, manuscripts, and photographs from the Nolan family album, along with a CD-R of the images in electronic format. Printed versions of these are included in the collection as are McDonald's annotations of these materials. Also included are copies of Nolan's song lead sheets, sheet music, and lyric sheets from Brigham Young University.
Digital photographs taken by Hillsborough, N.C., photographer James P. McKelvey at a concert by Geoff Muldaur and Jim Kweskin on 2 October 2013 at the Arts Center, Carrboro, N.C., and at a concert by Bruce Cockburn on 10 September 2011 at the Cat's Cradle, Carrboro, N.C. There are also photographs from the International Bluegrass Music Association Wide Open Bluegrass Festival on 24-28 September 2013 in Raleigh, N.C.
Born in Lenoir, N.C., in 1951, Bobby McMillon has performed professionally since 1978 as a singer, musician, and storyteller in the Appalachian tradition. As a performer, he is best known for his ballad and story renditions about Frankie Silver, to whom he is distantly related. He has also collected interviews with and songs and stories from family members, neighbors, and friends since 1968.
Interviews conducted in West Virginia in 1997 by Bryan T. McNeil for his honors essay In My Time: The Strike of 1949 in the Lives of the Coal Miners of Southern West Virginia (Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1998). The four interviewees are retired from the coal mining industry: Rufus Bethel is an African-American who worked as a coal miner; Roderick Pickett was a mine foreman; and Louis Vasvary and Fred Iddings are Anglo-American former coal miners. In the interviews, the participants discussed their lives, including their family history, their childhood, their experiences in the mines, and their thoughts on the United Mine Workers of America and on the mining industry in West Virginia. Special emphasis is placed on the period 1949-1950 with the men talking about the lifestyle during that time, their knowledge of negotiations during the 1949 strike, and their opinions relating to that event.
Judith McWillie is an artist, author of numerous essays on art and culture, and professor emeritus of drawing and painting at the Lamar Dodd School of Art in Athens, Ga. Much of her work centers on African American artists. Her book No Space Hidden: The Spirit of African American Yard Work (2005), co-written with Grey Gundaker, won the Southern Anthropological Society's James Mooney Award.
Guthrie Gus Turner Meade, Jr., was a computer programmer and systems analyst with a lifelong interest in folk music, especially traditional country music and Kentucky fiddlers. Meade avidly collected records and corresponded with record collectors, discographers, and music scholars around the world. He spent his summers recording and interviewing Kentucky fiddlers. In 1956, Meade began an annotated discography of early traditional country music. The discography includes some 14,500 recordings of 3,500 songs organized into four categories: ballads, religious songs, instrumentals, and novelty songs. He worked on this discography until his death in 1991.
San Antonio, Tex., native David Menconi became a professional music critic in 1985. He joined the News and Observer newspaper in Raleigh, N.C., in 1991, just as the area was being touted as an up-and-coming music scene. In 2000, Menconi published his first novel, Off the Record. The collection includes interview notes, correspondence, press releases, and biographies, 1984-2000, relating to interviews Menconi conducted with alt-country, folk-rock, and rock and roll musicians from North Carolina and other parts of the South. Among those represented are Whiskeytown, Arrogance, the Backsliders, the Connells, Cracker, Mitch Easter, Chris Stamey, Peter Holsapple, Flat Duo Jets, Kevn Kinney, Tift Merritt, and Southern Culture on the Skids.
Art Menius has been involved in the bluegrass music scene since 1983. After graduating from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1977 and an M.A. in 1981, he became a writer and concert promoter. His columns have appeared in the Raleigh, N.C., News and Observer, Bluegrass Unlimited, and the Durham, N.C., Independent Weekly. He helped write and was a production assistant for the old-time music series Fire on the Mountain. In 1985, he helped to found the International Bluegrass Music Association and served as its executive director, 1985-1990. He also served for ten years as the Marketing Director of MerleFest, a bluegrass festival in Wilkesboro, N.C.
Merge Records was founded in Chapel Hill, N.C., in 1989, by Mac McCaughan and Laura Ballance, at the same time that McCaughan and Ballance founded local independent rock band Superchunk. The record label began as a way to release recordings by Superchunk and other indie rock bands in the early 1990s. Merge featured bands from the local Chapel Hill music scene and released recordings on 7" records and in audiocassette form. In 1992, Merge released its first full-length release. The label has continued to grow since then and includes a wide range of national and international artists on its roster.
Singer and songwriter Tift Merritt was born 8 January 1975 in Houston, Tex., and grew up in Raleigh, N.C. Merritt studied creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she met drummer Zeke Hutchins and formed a band called the Carbines. Merritt became a popular figure in North Carolina's alternative-country music scene and signed a record contract with Lost Highway Records. As of January 2014, Merritt has released nine recordings, including collaborations with Two Dollar Pistols (1999) and classical pianist Simone Dinnerstein (2013).
The collection of folk revival musician and Appalachian dulcimer maker Howie Mitchell is comprised chiefly of letters he received in the early 1960s from traditional singer and banjo player Frank Proffitt. In his letters to Mitchell, Proffitt mentions family and friends, reading, playing music, musical instruments, folk music, folk songs, folk festivals, copyright, recording for Folkways, his tobacco crop, building a new house, and squirrel hunting. Also included in the collection are newspaper clippings, song lyrics, a letter to Mitchell from instrument maker Dennis Dorogi, guitar strings, and a 2002 note from Mitchell to folklorist and musician Mike Seeger about Proffitt's letters.
Bill Morrissey (1951-2011) was a folk singer, songwriter, performer, and author born in Hartford, Conn., and based in Massachusetts and New Hampshire throughout most of his career (circa 1980-2011). He recorded more than ten albums, including North (1986) and Standing Eight (1989), and was nominated for a Grammy Award for his album Songs of Mississippi John Hurt (1999). He also wrote poetry and fiction, including the novel Edson (1996).
In 1991, David C. Morton published DeFord Bailey: A Black Star in Early Country Music. Bailey (1899-1982) was a legendary African American harmonica player who performed on WSM's Grand Ole Opry, a weekly radio show broadcast from Nashville, Tenn. Bailey began his career soon after Nashville's WDAD radio station came on the air in 1925. He continued to play until 1941, becoming well known for his tune, Pan American Blues.
Artus Monroe Moser (1894-1992), writer, educator, and historian, spent much of his life collecting ballads in and around his home in Western North Carolina in an effort to document the folk traditions of Appalachia. Moser wrote extensively about the folk songs, folklore, and history of Appalachia, and recorded numerous Appalachian performers onto acetate discs. In 1945, the Library of Congress provided Moser with the equipment to collect and record more material, which was later placed in the LC's Archive of American Folk Song. The Artus Moser collection includes biographical material relating to Artus Moser and his wife, Mable Young Moser, and Moser's numerous writings on Appalachian folk song, folklore, history, and other subjects. Moser's writings on the life of novelist Thomas Wolfe and his biography of North Carolina potter Walter Benjamin Stephen are also included. Other materials are Moser's ballad collection, consisting of versions of over 200 traditional ballads and folk songs, as well as collected stories and reminiscences of Appalachian folklife. There are also family history materials and numerous photographs of Moser and his family, including Moser playing the part of Andrew Jackson in a 1950 performance of the outdoor drama Unto These Hills. Recordings consist of commercial 78rpm records and LPs Moser collected, as well as his own acetate disc recordings of traditional Appalachian performers, including Jean Ritchie, Bascom Lamar Lunsford, Marcus Martin, Maud Gentry Long, Samantha Bumgarner, George Pegram, Pleaz Mobley, Red Raper, and Virgil Sturgill. Other recordings include Waldensian singing, Western North Carolina Cherokee singer Will West Long, and shape note singers from Etowah, N.C.

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Martha J. Nelson is a former graduate student in the Curriculum in Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. From 1994 to 1995 she was staff folklorist at the Hiddenite Arts and Heritage Center in Hiddenite, N.C.
The New Light Gospel Music Store, owned by Roumel William Taylor, was located in Philadelphia, Pa., selling gospel music recordings and related items.
The North Carolina Arts Council was created in 1964 by executive order of Governor Terry Stanford to strengthen North Carolina's creativity, invention, and prosperity. In 1967, the North Carolina Arts Council became a statutory state agency. It operates under the aegis of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. The Council makes information, technical assistance, and over 1,000 grants a year available to non-profit organizations and artists in North Carolina. It also oversees the distribution of state and federal funds appropriated for support of the arts.
The North Carolina Folklife Media Project Collection contains radio programs and associated field recordings, 1982-1983, produced by the North Carolina Folklife Media Project, a National Endowment for the Arts funded media project directed by folklorist Cecelia (Cece) Conway. As project director, Conway headed the production of North Carolina Traditions, an 8-part radio series featuring North Carolina based musicians that aired on WUNC, the flagship National Public Radio station for the Research Triangle area of North Carolina. The collection primarily consists of master recordings, 1982-1983, of these radio programs produced by the grant funded project. The collection also includes associated field recordings, 1983, featuring the North Carolina based blues guitarist and vocalist, Algia Mae Hinton. The North Carolina Traditions radio programs feature such artists as Etta Baker, a nationally-recognized African-American Piedmont blues guitarist from Caldwell County, N.C.; traditional Anglo-American fiddler Ike Rochelle, singer and accordion player Worth Mason, and fiddler Otha Willard, all from the coastal region of N.C.; Dorsey Dixon (1897-1968), Anglo-American singer and composer of textile and other songs from Richmond County; African-American gospel quartet the Golden Echoes of Granville County; Big Boy Henry (1921- ), African-American blues guitarist and singer from Beaufort County; Algia Mae Hinton (1929- ), African-American blues singer and guitarist and buck dancer from Johnston County; and John (Frail) Joines (1914- ), Anglo-American traditional storyteller from Brushy Mountain, Wilkes County.
The North Carolina Symphony was formed in 1932 under the direction of Pulitzer Traveling Fellow Lamar Stringfield. The Symphony was a Works Progress Administration project in the 1930s; in the 1940s, it was the first orchestra to receive state funding on a continuous basis. Benjamin Swalin and Maxine Swalin led the Symphony from 1939 to 1972. They promoted the idea of taking the orchestra out to all parts of the state, a tradition that began in 1943 when the North Carolina State Legislature passed what was referred to as the Horn Tootin' Bill. As of 2009, the Symphony plays over 175 concerts in 30 to 40 counties in North Carolina per year.
The North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources is the state agency responsible for arts, history, and library programs; among its divisions is the State Library of North Carolina.

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Promotional materials relating to the motion picture film O Brother, Where Art Thou?, including lobby cards, photographs, poster, and production notes.
A twenty-year editor for Guitar Player magazine, Jas Obrecht has been writing about music since the mid-1970s. The Jas Obrecht Collection consists of audio interview recordings, 1978-2012, that Obrecht conducted with prominent guitarists and musicians throughout his career as a music journalist; manuscript versions of Obrecht's books, My Son Jimi, Talking Guitar, and Early Blues: The First Stars of Blues Guitar; original articles by Obrecht in Victrola and 78 Quarterly and reprinted articles in Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese issues of Guitar Player and in other German and Italian magazines; celebrity correspondence and memorabilia; materials affiliated with the musician, Brian Patrick Carroll, who is known professionally as Buckethead; demo tapes and mixes; and other writings and papers.
Steve Oliva grew up in Asheville, N.C., and Cape May, N.J. He studied English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and graduated in 2007. He works as a designer, illustrator, printmaker, and musician in Durham, N.C.
Opelika Pictures is a film company founded by New York-based filmmaker Macky Alston (Wallace McPherson Alston III). Alston directed the documentary film, Family Name, which examines the links between himself and the descendants of former slaves in North Carolina who share the Alston name. The collection is comprised of research and genealogy notes, audio and video tapes, film, record albums, publications, photographs, business and personal correspondence, and clippings associated with the making of Family Name. Included are photographs of the work of artist Charles Henry Alston and interviews with his sisters and others who knew him. There are also photographs and taped interviews with Macky Alston and members of his family.
The Blanton Owen Collection consists of audio, motion picture films, and field notes, 1963-1971, created and compiled by folklorist, musician, and photographer, Blanton Owen (1945-1998). The audio recordings primarily feature Anglo-American old-time musicians from Virginia, West Virginia, and North Carolina, including Hubert Caldwell, French Carpenter, Fred Cockerham (1905-1980), Mose Coffman, Virgil Craven (1902-1980), Burl Hammons, R. H. Haymore, John Hilt, Tommy Jarell (1901-1985), Taylor Kimble (1892-1979), Maggie Hammons Parker, Manco Sneed, Dan Tate, and Oscar Wright (1894-). Also included in the collection are audio recordings of a worship service at Little River Primitive Baptist Church. Of particular note are motion picture films, audio recordings, and field notes, 1971, associated with Blanton Owen's unfinished documentary film project that features Tommy Jarrell and Fred Cockerham playing music and conversing on Cockerham's porch in Low Gap, N.C. The collection also contains field notes created by Southern Folklife Collection staff that correspond to select audio recordings. These SFC field notes include performers' names, technical information about the tape, a brief description of contents, song titles, and tunings.
An instructor and coordinator of performing arts at Western Piedmont Community College in Morganton, N.C., Cheryl Oxford received her B.A. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her M.A. and Ph.D. at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. The collection includes materials that Cheryl Oxford collected and produced in conjunction with her Ph.D. dissertation, They Call Him Lucky Jack: 3 Performance-Centered Case Studies of Storytelling in Watauga County, N.C. The focus of this research was the stories and performance paradigms of three traditional Appalachian Jack tale storytellers from North Carolina: Ray Hicks, Stanley Hicks, and Marshall Ward. Other regional tellers of Jack tales, both traditional and revival, including W. W. Rowland, Richard Chase, Frank Proffitt, Jr., Gwenda LedBetter, Doug Elliott, Orville Hicks, and Fred Armstrong-Park, were also documented as part of her research. The bulk of the materials are audio and video recordings of public performances and interviews, which include storytelling. Also included are story transcripts, published articles by Cheryl Oxford, and a copy of her dissertation. Most of the fieldwork was conducted during the summers of 1981 and 1982, with fieldwork and performance documentation continuing until 1988. The collection provides rich documentation of specific stories and storytelling performances by North Carolina regional storytellers and examples of the same story told by different tellers in the same region and the same story told by the same teller on different occasions. Audio and video recordings also contain a wealth of material on Appalachian traditional medicine, ghost stories, music, family genealogy, and folk customs and beliefs. Included is a rare performance of Jack in the Lions' Den by Marshall Ward.

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Folklorist Daniel W. Patterson (1928- ) Kenan Professor Emeritus of English and the former chair of the Curriculum in Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Patterson played a pivotal role in the development of the Southern Folklife Collection (SFC), which opened to researchers in 1989. He has published several books about North Carolina folk life, southern traditional and religious folk music, Shaker art and music, and other topics. Folklorist Beverly Bush Patterson, born Beverly Bush in Mineola, Tex. She served on the North Carolina Arts Council, from 1992 until her retirement from the position in 2004, when she took the position of Executive Director of the North Carolina Folklife Institute. One of her focuses was southern religious music. The Pattersons have often collaborated in their work and research. They were both involved as consultants with Tom Davenport on his folklife films and also worked with Davenport on the Folkstreams project and website for streaming folklife documentary films. Daniel and Beverly Patterson collaborated with Jim Peacock and Ruel Tyson on the World and Identity Primitive Baptist collection. Another well-known collaboration was the Index of Selected Folk Recordings Project, which provided access via microfiche to over 500 albums with information on individual songs now held by the Southern Folklife Collection.
The North Carolina Folklore Broadcast Collection consists of audio recordings and related material, 1976, created as part of a National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) funded grant project that was carried out jointly by the graduate students and faculty of the Curriculum in Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with help from the staff of WUNC-FM. Folklorist and professor in English and Folklore at UNC, Daniel W. Patterson, directed the grant project, which consisted of producing a series of taped radio programs of regional folklore for broadcast over public radio in the state of North Carolina. For the contents of the program, the production team drew from discs and field tapes in the UNC's folklore archives (now known as the Southern Folklife Collection) as well as field recordings made specifically for the project. The radio series consisted of five one-hour broadcasts, each with a specific focus chosen to show a variety of local traditions. The themes and subjects of the five programs included Primitive Baptist songs, Durham blues, Piedmont blues, Chatham County, N.C., Tommy Jarrell (1901-1985), and Cas Wallin. The collection includes both the WUNC distributed radio programs as well as the field recordings made specifically for the project. The collection also includes related materials, including a copy of the NEA grant proposal signed by Patterson, a photograph of Cas Wallin alongside Dellie Norton and Evelyn Ramsey, and field notes that correspond to select audio recordings found in the collection.
The Lloyd Perryman Collection contains papers and audio recordings compiled by actor, singer, and Sons of the Pioneers member, Lloyd Perryman. Papers consist of scores, lyrics, song sheets, song folios, publicity photographs, and clippings relating to the Sons of the Pioneers. Audio recordings consist primarily of radio shows, compilations, songs, and public service announcements by Sons of the Pioneers, Lloyd Perryman, Rex Allen, Rusty Richards, The Whippoorwills, and others.
The Barry Poss Collection consists of 25 recordings, 1976-1979, created and compiled by Sugarhill Records founder, Barry Poss. The majority of the items are recordings, 1976-1977, of Virgil Craven (1902-1980), an Anglo-American old-time string band musician of Cedar Falls, N.C. The collection also includes two live recordings from 1975 of Gaither Carlton (1901-1972), an Anglo-American old-time fiddler, banjo player and singer from Deep Gap, Watauga County, N.C., and Arthel Doc Watson (1923-2012), an Anglo-American guitarist, banjo player and singer also from Deep Gap, Watauga County, N.C.
Elvis Presley (1935-1977) was a highly influential musician and actor. Between 1956 and 1969, he starred in 31 films. Each film included songs by the actor, although not all were performed on-screen.
Ethnomusicologist Karen Helms Pressley was born in Union County, N.C. Classically trained in piano, organ, and voice, Pressley developed an interest in the preservation of old-time music and the oral tradition. The collection contains fieldwork relating primarily to the oral musical traditions of the Outer Banks of North Carolina and Union County, N.C., in south-central North Carolina. Outer Banks materials consist of recorded folk songs, stories, and interviews with residents, as well as interview transcripts, Pressley's essay on the oral traditions of the Outer Banks, and ballads and songs she collected. The Union County, N.C., materials consist of field recordings Pressley made documenting the oral musical traditions of Union County. Music includes church gospel, guitar blues, fiddle and banjo tunes, traditional ballad singing, and childrens' songs performed by Union County residents. Also included are other recordings made by Pressley, among them some with storyteller Bobby McMillon, recordings from western North Carolina and the Piedmont area, and recordings relating to music workshops and children's songs.
Raymond H. Pulley was a professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1966-1973, and at Appalachian State University, 1973-1995. While a student at Oscar Frommel Smith High School in South Norfolk, Va., 1955-1957, Pulley worked as an engineer and disc jockey at the student-run radio station WOSFM, hosting The Cuzin' Ray Hoedown, a daily two-hour program that featured rock and roll, country, and hillbilly music. On 12 February 1956, Pulley interviewed Elvis Presley, Maybelle Carter, Helen Carter, June Carter, and Anita Carter in conjunction with their appearance at the Norfolk Municipal Auditorium.

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The Tom Rankin Collection consists of 31 field recordings, 1980-1982, created and compiled by photographer, filmmaker, and folklorist, Tom Rankin, while he was a graduate student in the Curriculum in Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The audio recordings primarily feature interviews and performances by blues, country, and old-time musicians from North Carolina. Artists featured on the recordings include Richard Big Boy Henry, a country blues artist of Beaufort, Carteret County, N.C; C. L. Scott, a traditional fiddler of Morehead City, Carteret County, N.C.; W. Earl Wicker, an old-time fiddler of Tramway, Lee County, N.C.; Jim Harris, a centenarian fiddler of New Bern, Craven County, N.C.; the Swain family of Columbia, Tyreell County, N.C.; and Mr. O. Williard, an old-time fiddler of Williamston, Martin County, N.C, among others. Rankin primarily recorded the artists performing at their home, while folklorist and banjo player, Bill Mansfield, accompanied many of the artists on the recordings. The collection also includes studio recordings of Big Boy Henry recorded at WUNC in Chapel Hill and dubs of Living Atlanta, a documentary radio series produced by WRFG.
Audiovisual materials and supporting documentation compiled by radio producer and Murray Street Productions founder, Steve Rathe. Audiovisual materials consist primarily of audio recordings of radio productions relating to National Public Radio and Murray Street Productions. Radio programs represented in the collection include Appalachia Waltz, Folk Festival, USA, HEAT with John Hockenberry, Jazz Alive!, New Music America, RadioVisions, SportsBand, and The Territory of Art, among others. Other miscellaneous audio recordings found in the collection include unidentified radio productions, demos, audition tapes, dubbed recordings of 78s, and conference recordings. The collection also contains moving image materials compiled by Rathe, including live performances, promotional videos, dubbed television broadcasts, video production materials, and video materials relating to select radio productions.
The Ola Belle Reed Collection consists of audio recordings and other materials of American folk singer, songwriter, and banjo player, Ola Belle Reed. Reed was born in Grassy Creek, N.C. As a teenager, she performed with an early version of the North Carolina Ridge Runners. In 1949, she married Bud Reed. Together they formed the New River Gang, along with Ola Belle Reed's brother, Alex Campbell, and operated New River Ranch, a popular country music park near Rising Sun, Md. In the early 1960s, they moved to Sunset Park in West Grove, Pa., and began broadcasting a weekly show from their store in Oxford, Pa. During the 1970s, Ola Belle Reed and family performed at many folk festivals, including the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and the Brandywine Mountain Music Convention. Audio materials in the collection include open reel recordings, 1969-1972, of traditional and original songs by Reed; family members, Bud Reed, David Reed, Ralph Reed, Herb Campbell, and Alex Campbell; and friends and neighbors, including Hazel Waltman. Additional audio materials include open reel recordings of Reed speaking about her life and music, a taped performance by the North Carolina Ridge Runners, and compact discs of live performances, 1960-1976, by Ola Belle Reed and others, including Alex Campbell, Bud Reed, and David Reed. The collection also contains a copy of High on the Mountain, Reed's unpublished autobiography; lyrics, handwritten sheet music, and lists of traditional songs and original compositions by Reed; clippings about Reed from various publications; a program from the Foothills Festival 1977; a promotional flier from Sunset Ranch; and three photographs. Correspondents include Josh Dunson, Pete Seeger, and John McGuigan.
David Robert is a former owner of the Chapel Hill (now Carrboro), N.C., music venue Cat's Cradle and previously ran Moonlight Records, an independent record label based in Chapel Hill, N.C. The collection consists of office files, publications, posters, promotional materials, sound recordings, and ephemera, 1970s-1980s. Acquired as part of the Southern Folklife Collection.
Katherine R. Roberts has held a joint appointment in the Curriculum in American Studies and the Curriculm in Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill since 2006. Her research interests are centered on material culture.
Anne Romaine (1942-1995), folk music performer, historian, and writer, was active in the civil rights movement, and, with Bernice Johnson Reagon, created the Southern Folk Cultural Revival Project, a racially mixed group of traditional artists who toured the South. Romaine, who was married to civil rights activist Howard Romaine, also worked with Guy Carawan, Esther Lefever, and Hazel Dickens. Materials, 1935-1995, include correspondence, book manuscripts, songs, publicity materials, photographs, and recordings of Anne Romaine's performances. Among the topics covered are civil rights work in the 1960s, labor organization, cotton mills and textile workers, Bernice Johnson Reagon and the Southern Folk Cultural Revival Project, country music, labor songs, and folk music as a means of social protest. Also included are materials relating to her husband Howard Romaine; to her teaching career; and to her interest in astrology, particularly psychic readings. Personal and business correspondence, 1962-1995, includes many copies of outgoing letters. There are also manuscripts of two books, one about the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and the other a biography of Alex Haley; song-lyrics and audio and video recordings of Romaine's performances and workshops; and publicity photographs and posters relating to Romaine and to musicians and other performers who worked with the Southern Folk Cultural Revival Project. Also included are photographs of Romaine's family and slides reflective of various social injustices that Romaine used as backdrops in her performances.
Velma Rooke was raised in Jacksonville, Fla., but spent her adulthood as a professional musician, music educator, and music therapist in New York, N.Y. Rooke studied at The Julliard School and Columbia University. From approximately 1933 until 1956, Rooke was first chair trombonist, relief pianist, and arranger for Phil Spitalny's Hour of Charm All-Girl Orchestra. After the orchestra disbanded in 1956, Rooke became first trombonist for the Great Neck Philharmonic Orchestra. She also worked as a music therapist at the Creative Arts Rehabilitation Center (CARC), commonly known as the Music Therapy Center from its inception in 1960 until the early 1980s. Rooke also conducted music therapy and lessons at various New York locations, including the veterans affairs hospital in the Bronx, the Reece School for Emotionally Disturbed Children, and the Turtle Bay Music School.
In 1976, Mike Kappus founded The Rosebud Agency, an artist booking agency based in San Francisco, Calif. Kappus started the agency with the concept of offering greater service to an intentionally limited number of timeless, rather than trendy, artists. Until it wound down its active role as a booking agency in December of 2013, the agency booked about 2000 shows a year worldwide for its more than thirty artists.
Woodrow W. Rowland was a storyteller from western North Carolina.

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The Patricia Sawin Collection consists of audio recordings, 1979-1989, and a video documentary, 1996, created by folklorist, Patricia Sawin. The materials relate to Sawin's longstanding exploration of the life, songs, and stories of Bessie Eldreth, a folk singer from the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. Born in 1913 on an Ashe County farm, Eldreth accompanied her everyday life with old ballads, gospel songs and hymns, parlor songs, and original songs. It was not until the 1970s that Eldreth began to sing publicly with her granddaughter, Jean Reid. The Sawin Collection contains audio from this period, including field recordings of live concerts, special events, church services, as well as interviews and story telling with Eldreth and Reid. The collection also contains video copies of Sawin's 1996 documentary film on Eldreth titled, Bessie Eldreth: Stories and Songs of a Blue Ridge Life.
The Mark Schultz Collection consists of field recordings of rural church services created by historian, Mark Schultz, for personal use. The majority of the audio recordings were made at Baptist, African Methodist Episcopal (AME), United Methodist, and Pentecostal churches in Georgia, including Hancock County, Oglethorpe County, and Clarke County. The recordings document African American and white church services, and feature gospel music, pastor anniversaries, homecomings, and choir anniversaries, among other church activities. The collection also contains an additional field recording of an AME choir reunion in Malvern, Pa., as well as a photograph of the Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Hancock County, Ga.
Tommy Scott began his career in entertainment playing guitar and singing for local square dances. He performed on a radio broadcast for the first time in 1933, and, in 1936, joined Doc Chamberlain's Medicine Show, which had toured the South since 1890. In 1938, Scott took over the show, which was later known as Ramblin' Tommy Scott's Hollywood Hillbilly Jamboree. Scott performed on radio station WWVA in Wheeling, W.Va., where he developed characters and routines that were later featured in his live, radio, and television appearances, including a blackface character named Lightning and a ventriloquist act featuring the puppet Luke McLuke. Scott wrote a number of hit country and western songs and appeared in several feature films. The Ramblin' Tommy Scott Show, which began airing in 1948, was the first country music show on television. During the 1950s, Scott had another show on television called Tommy Scott's Smokey Mountain Jamboree.
The Dave Sear Collection consists of audio recordings, 1959-1996, created and compiled by the New York based folk musician and radio producer, Dave Sear. A veteran of over 40 years in radio, Sear is best known as the host and producer of the nationally syndicated programs, Adventures in Folk Music, Folk and Baroque, and Folk Music Almanac. All three programs were produced at WNYC and broadcast by public radio stations across the United States. The Dave Sear Collection contains programs from these three radio series, in addition to miscellaneous recordings of live concerts and recorded music, all of which feature major figures from the folk revival movement. Artists featured on the recordings include David Amram, Guy and Candy Carawan, Michael Cooney, Louis Killen, Dave Mallett, Tom Paxton, Utah Phillips, Jean Redpath, Jean Ritchie, John Roberts and Tony Barrand, Peter Schickele, Pete Seeger, Fred Small, Bill Staines, Sonny Terry, Happy Traum, and Robin and Linda Williams, among others.
Mike Seeger, collector, folklorist, and traditional music performer, devoted his life to singing, playing, and recording old-time and bluegrass music. The collection consists of audio, video, film, and supporting documentation for studio recordings and live performances in concerts and festivals by Seeger and others, including his band the New Lost City Ramblers, and Seeger's interviews with many notable old-time and bluegrass musicians. There are also photographs of Seeger and many of the artists represented, as well as his correspondence, project files, writings, publicity, and extensive documentation of his appointments, contacts, contracts, and other financial records.
Lauchlin Nordan Shaw, a third-generation farmer from Anderson Creek Township, Harnett County, N.C., taught himself how to play his father's fiddle when he was ten years old. Shaw traveled and recorded extensively, often with A. C. Overton, his musical partner for 50 years. He was repeatedly honored for his traditional fiddling style and promotion of old-time music. The collection includes sound recordings, many recorded by Lauchlin Shaw's wife, Mary Lily Shaw, at the Shaw residence; notes from 8-track and reel-to-reel tape boxes; and other documentation. Musicians include Apple Chill Cloggers, the Britt Brothers, Virgil Craven, Glenn Davis, Marvin Gaster, Tom Hearn, Wayne Livengood, Margaret Martin, Wayne Martin, Fred Olson, A. C. Overton, Evelyn Shaw, Malcolm Shaw, Robert Temple, and Wade Yates. Scattered throughout the recordings are Christmas carols that were recorded during family gatherings.
The Patrick and Cathy Sky Collection consists of a 1991 interview with Tommy Thompson conducted by musician, Cathy Sky, in Chapel Hill, N.C. Thompson was a founding member of both the Hollow Rock String Band and the Red Clay Ramblers, as well as a playwright, composer, and actor. Cathy Sky conducted the interview with Thompson for an article in the Raleigh-based Spectator Magazine. In the interview Tommy Thompson discusses the Red Clay Ramblers, his early dramas and musicals, and playwright Sam Shepard.
The Sons of the Pioneers was one of the leading vocal and instrumental groups in Western music. They were especially known for their harmonies, songwriting, and musicianship. In addition to their creative success, the Pioneers were among the longest lasting groups in the history of country music, celebrating 65 years of continuous performances in 1998. Over the years, the members of the group included Pat Brady, Ken Carson, Ken Curtis, Tommy Doss, Hugh Farr, Karl Farr, Shug Fisher, Luther Nallie, Bob Nolan, Lloyd Perryman, Rusty Richards, Roy Rogers, Tim Spencer, and Dale Warren.
The Souls Grown Deep Foundation was created with the goal of identifying, documenting, preserving, and promoting the visual art of the African American South. Its work is focused on the artworks of self-taught African American artists in the southeastern United States. The Souls Grown Deep Foundation was founded by William Arnett, an art historian, scholar, and collector. Since its inception in the 1980s, the foundation has been located in Atlanta, Ga.
Audio recordings of the North Carolina Arts Council funded radio series, Sounds of the South, which aired on WUNC-FM's Backporch Music from 1991 to 1994. Hosted by Tom Hanchett, the series consisted of thirty-minute programs that primarily featured 1930s and 1940s classic country music sourced from the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Folklorist, Wayne Martin, and former UNC Sound and Image Librarian, Mike Casey, were also involved in the production of the series. Program themes on the series included songs of prohibition, early country radio, southern Christmas songs, southern storytellers, women blues singers, the local music scene, The Two Sisters ballad, music from the Carolina coast, local music festivals, Durham blues, preserving African-American traditions, and southern author, Lee Smith. Also included in the collection is an episode list for the 1991-1992 programs, a tape log for the Preserving African-American Traditions program, and photocopies of clippings regarding the program.
Southern Culture on the Skids was founded in Chapel Hill, N.C., in 1985. Original members of the band are guitarist and vocalist Richard (Rick) Miller, lead vocalist Stan Lewis, Bassist Leslie Land, and drummer Chip Shelby. The collection contains sound recordings, posters, and ephemera of Southern Culture on the Skids, 1980s-1990s. Acquired as part of the Southern Folklife Collection.
Founded in 1966 by Anne Romaine and Bernice Johnson Reagon, the Southern Folk Cultural Revival Project (SFCRP), based in Nashville, Tenn., worked to present traditional musicians from black and white cultures in performance together at a time when this was considered controversial. The SFCRP continued presenting musical performances throughout the South until the late 1980s, keeping close ties with the civil rights movement.
The materials in this collection were compiled from various sources by Southern Folklife Collection staff, with the goal of creating a reference resource to aid in research. Artist name files contain correspondence, booklets, obituaries, press releases, discographies, promotional materials, and other items relating to many of the artists whose work is relevant to the Southern Folklife Collection as a whole.
The collection consists of materials related to record labels, discographies, and record collecting in the United States and around the world, 1907-2006. Included are recording catalogs, discographies, press releases, newsletters, record release announcements, promotional materials, newspaper and magazine articles, ledgers, and correspondence. Also included are collectors' inventories; auction, sale, and wants lists; collectors' reference guides; and directories of record collectors. Some catalogs, on the Capitol, Conqueror, Columbia, Decca, Gennett, Harmony, His Master's Voice, King, MGM, Okeh, Parlophone, RCA Victor, Regal, Vocalion, and Zonophone labels, date from the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. There is also a Victor Records catalog from 1907 and a 1924 Paramount and Black Swan catalog annotated by Paramount producer J. Mayo Williams and sociologist Guy B. Johnson. Okeh Records material includes original label copy for about 150 records released by Okeh in the 1920s. The collection also contains substantial materials related to the American Record Corporation, Arhoolie, Bear Family, Champion, County, Edison, Romeo, Sugar Hill, and Smithsonian/Folkways record labels. There are less inclusive materials relating to many other companies. Ledgers include Brunswick and Vocalion ledger sheets from the 1920s, as well as ledgers of recordings made by record producer Art Satherley. Among the collectors represented are Eugene Earle, John Edwards, Will Roy Hearne, and D.K. Wilgus; among those with extensive discographies are Kitty Wells and Johnny Cash.
This collection contains fan club newsletters, primarily published by the fan clubs of country music artists. Artists significant in the collection are listed as access points. There are also several publications of the International Council of Fan Clubs and the International Fan Club Organization.
This collection contains materials from various music and folk festivals held throughout the United States and internationally in Australia, Canada, England, and other countries, 1936-2005. Festivals center around music (chiefly bluegrass, blues, country, folk, jazz, old-time, cajun, and zydeco) and/or crafts, dance, storytelling, fiddling competitions, or other similar topics and activities. Included are flyers and other promotional materials, programs, guides, newspaper clippings, and other items.
This collection comprises field notes, transcripts, memos, ephemera, and other items associated with sound and video recordings assembled at the Southern Folklife Collection. The identifying number for the associated recording as well as provenance information (where available) is noted in the finding aid. Materials in this collection are associated with recordings from a wide variety of collections, including those of Andy Cahan, Bob Carlin, Cecelia Conway, the John Edwards Memorial Foundation, Joan Fenton, Peter Hartman, Glenn Hinson, the Goldband Recording Corporation, John Huddle, A. P. Hudson, Beverly Patterson, Daniel Patterson, and many others. The recordings in those collections include materials produced for commercial distribution as well as (predominantly) materials gathered in a field context by folklorists. The notes include information on African American music, banjo music, Primitive Baptist church music, country music, fiddle tunes, folk music, folklorists, old-time music, popular music, storytelling, and other topics, chiefly but not exclusively relating to North Carolina or the American South.
Southern Folklife Collection Moving Image Materials were compiled, 1972-1989, from various sources, including the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Folklore Department and the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. The collection includes videotapes on North Carolina and South Carolina history, town life, culture, religion, and churches; folklife, folk art, and folk music; African American music, dance, and verse; medicine shows; Confederate officer Zebulon Baird Vance; African American slave Denmark Vesey; musicians Pink Anderson, Henry Johnson, Willie Trice, Dink Roberts, Guitar Shorty, Jamie Alston, Wilber Atwater, Bascom Lamar Lunsford, and John Dee Holeman; the Blue Grass Rangers; folklorist Bruce Bastine; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor Glenn Hinson; and filmmakers Tom Rankin, Beverly Boggs, Rosemarie Hester, Vik Lukas, Cecelia Conway, Tom Davenport, Joan Fenton, and Roger Manley. There are some interviews with and performances by blues and folk musicians, and some items include storytelling. Locations in North Carolina include Badin, Weaverville, Hot Springs, Durham, Elizabethtown, Pittsboro, and Creedmore. Locations in South Carolina include Spartanburg, Union, Wadmalaw Island, and Johns Island. All of the videotapes are U-Matic, 1/2-inch open reel, and 2-inch videotapes with sound. Both field recordings and documentary films are represented.
The Southern Folklife Poster collection comprises posters received from various sources and assembled by the SFC. The posters include advertisements for live performances, conventions, festivals, meetings, dances, and exhibits; promotional materials for commercial recordings; reproductions of drawings, engravings, and other works of art; and other assorted ephemera. Highlights include an 1847 poster for Christy's Minstrels; circa 1950 two-color posters for Grand Ole Opry stars Ernest Tubb, Minnie Pearl, Bill Monroe, Eddy Arnold, and Whitey The Duke of Paducah Ford; advertisements for Carolina Folk Festivals in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and folk festivals in Berkeley, Calif., New York, N.Y., and Chicago, Ill., in the 1960s; a series of circa 1950 posters for country and bluegrass shows at the Lyric Theatre in Rainelle, W.Va.; a circa 1950 poster for a Hillbilly and Variety Show in Collingwood, Victoria, Australia; and a poster advertising the 1967 Monterey International Pop Festival.
The collection consists of materials related to radio stations and television stations in the United States and Mexico, 1930-2005. Materials include program guides, radio playlists, station newsletters, promotional materials, newspaper and magazine articles, station-produced publications, correspondence, press releases, and about 56 press release photographs from KBBQ in Burbank, Calif. Some KBBQ photographs depict country music recording artists, including Lynn Anderson, Eddy Arnold, Glen Campbell, Jimmy Dean, Merle Haggard, Lee Hazlewood, Ferlin Husky, Waylon Jennings, Jerry Lee Lewis, George Lindsey, Roger Miller, Buck Owens, Ray Price, Jeannie C. Riley, Tex Ritter, Nancy Sinatra, Hank Thompson, Sheb Wooley, and Tammy Wynette; Hollywood tailor Nudie Cohn; and actor Andy Griffith. Station publications include about 150 issues of Stand By! from WLS in Chicago, Ill., from the 1930s and 1940s. There is also material relating to the Southern Baptists Radio-Television Commission.
The collection consists of sheet music and song lyrics from the United States, circa 1852-1988. The sheet music is largely for country songs. Much of this music was published by Acuff-Rose of Nashville, Tenn., but other music publishers are also represented. Among the artists represented are Felice and Boudleaux Bryant, Martha Carson, Helen Carter, Don Gibson, John D. Loudermilk, Ira and Charles Louvin, Roy Orbison, and Leon Payne.
This collection consists of song folios from the United States, Canada, Australia, and England, circa 1882-1983. Some folios were published by radio stations, including WSM in Nashville, Tenn., and WWVA in Wheeling, W.Va. Musical genres and song styles represented include calypso, comedy songs, country songs, cowboy songs, gospel songs, Hawaiian songs, hobo songs, hymns, Irish reels, labor songs, Latin-American songs, minstrel songs, Mormon songs, novelty songs, parodies, popular songs, spirituals, songs of the Industrial Workers of the World, traditional songs, union songs, vaudeville, western songs, and World War II songs. Significant persons and groups are listed below.
The collection comprises 303 folders containing background information on subjects germane to the collecting mission of the Southern Folklife Collection. These subjects, while they all pertain to folkways and traditions in North Carolina or other locations in the American southeast, span a broad array of academic disciplines and cultural interests. General topics include African American music, ballads, banjo music, bluegrass music, blues, cajun music, country music, cowboy music, fiddle music, folk music, gospel music, guitar music, hillbilly music, jazz, old-time music, rhythm and blues, rock, western swing, zydeco, and other types of music; animal calls; folklore and customs of the Appalachian region; folk art; folklore; furniture; ghost stories; hollering; Native Americans; labor lore and songs; legends and storytelling; Melungeons; minstrel shows; oral traditions; Primitive Baptists; race relations; shape note singing; snake cults; square dancing; tattooing; Waldenses; and others. Materials contained in the files include newspaper clippings, magazine articles, pamphlets, other writings, theses, dissertations, correspondence, memoranda, handbills, sheet music, press releases, bibliographies, discographies, newsletters, theater and concert programs, catalogs, instructional booklets, exhibit guides, directories, invitations, brochures and church fans.
The Southern Folklife Transcription Discs consist of commercially recorded transcription discs documenting a wide array of radio programs and individual performers from the early 1940s through the late 1960s. Performers represented include: Eddy Arnold; Chet Atkins; Gene Autry; Johnny Bond and His Red River Valley Boys; June Carter (June Carter Cash); the Cass County Boys; Spade Cooley; Eddie Dean and the Pals of the Golden West; Jimmy Dean; Johnny Desmond; Duke Ellington; Tennessee Ernie Ford; the Harmoneers; Hawkshaw Hawkins; Ferlin Husky; Hank Keene and His Gang; Pee Wee King and His Golden West Cowboys; Texas Jim Lewis and His Lone Star Cowboys; Hank Penny and His California Cowhands; the Prairie Ramblers; Riders of the Purple Sage; Carson Robison and His Buckaroos; Carl Smith; the Sons of the Pioneers; Uncle Henry's Original Kentucky Mountaineers; Kitty Wells; Tex Williams; Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys; and many more. Radio programs represented include: Old Fashioned Revival Hour; Music by the Baptist Hour Choir; and The Human Adventure: Story of Ballads. Genres documented include country music, Hawaiian music, jazz, and western swing.
The Southern Highland Handicraft Guild is a non-profit educational organization with a focus on teaching people in the southern Appalachian mountains traditional handicrafts and providing market outlets for them. The Guild represents over 700 craftspeople in 293 counties of nine southeastern states. From 1993 to 1995, Georgia Wier, folklorist for the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, with assistance from Ron Ruehl, Patience Bingham, and Betsy Baker, documented the handicraft work of individual, educational, and organizational members of the Guild in North Carolina. The documentation consisted of interviews with individual artists focusing on their craft and their association with the Guild and other folk art schools, organizations, or family businesses. The handicrafts of woodworking and weaving are particularly well represented, with a number of folk schools and artists documented. Also included are colonial knotting, pewter work, pottery, Hmong needlework, and dried flower arrangement.
Molly Stouten, artist, art educator, and musician, of Greensboro, N.C. The collection contains a handmade book by Stouten illustrating the traditional folk ballad Omie Wise and 23 audio field tapes of traditional Appalachian music. One of 15 of its kind, the book includes eleven intaglio prints with the text of the ballad set in linotype. Also included are slides and other materials relating to the book. The field tapes are from several visits and a 1992 residency Stouten did in the Cumberland Plateau region of Tennessee and Kentucky. They document musicians, including fiddlers and traditional singers, mostly from Jamestown, Tenn.; Monticello, Ky.; and Fentress County, Tenn. Kentucky fiddler Clyde Davenport is prominently featured. Also appearing on the tapes are John Doss, Merta Doss, Nancy Hicks Winningham, Charlie Acuff, Clyde Troxell, Ralph Troxell, and Virgil Anderson.
The Bryson Strauss Collection consists of live audio and video recordings, 2000, of North Carolina based alternative-country bands, Tift Merritt and the Carbines and Trailer Bride. Compiled by Bryson Strauss, the recordings were made by Aaron Taylor at the Historic Playmakers Theatre in Chapel Hill, N.C. The performances were part of the first annual Classic Sounds of the South concert series sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Curriculum in Folklore. Recordings are on Digital Audio Tape (DAT) and MiniDV.
Student Action with Farmworkers (SAF) conducts Into the Fields, a ten-week summer internship program for university students in North and South Carolina and from farmworking families nationwide. As part of this internship, student interns receive training in folklife fieldwork and complete a documentary oral history project. The documentary fieldwork focuses on farmworkers and their families in North and South Carolina, primarily, though not exclusively, migrant Latino workers, many illegal immigrants to the United States. The folklife documented includes foodways, traditional dance, art, music, and oral literature, religious beliefs and practices, life stories and experiences, labor camp life, and involvement in the labor movement. The collection includes fieldwork documentation, audio tapes, slides, videos, papers analyzing the material collected, and, from 1999-2001, printed publications with articles and photographs highlighting material from projects. The interviews and transcripts are largely in Spanish, with some translation. Fieldwork documentation and analysis includes the fieldworkers' impressions and reactions and are mostly in English. The published material from 2000 and 2001 includes side-by-side text in English and Spanish.
Jason Summers and Kate Fix created the film Unknown Passage: the Dead Moon story (2006). The collection consists of a poster for the film, two holiday postcards created by Jason Summers and Kate Fix, and a digital recording of the first performance of the band Pipe, 15 February 1992, of which Jason Summers was a member.
Brett Sutton (1948- ) was born and raised in Champaign-Urbana, Ill. He eared as Masters degree in 1976 from the Curriculum of Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His thesis focused on African American spiritual folk singing around Raleigh and Durham, N.C. Peter Hartman (1959- ) earned a B.S. in 1975 UNC. Hartman, also a banjo player, joined Brett Sutton to explore their mutual interest in religious folk music. In 1976, they moved to southwestern Virginia where they worked on an NEH-funded project called Religious Folksongs in the Virginia Mountains. From this research, they produced a book and LP recording called Primitive Baptist Hymns of the Blue Ridge (UNC Press, 1982). The collection consists of sound recordings and documentation relating to Sutton and Hartman's NEH project. The folk hymn singing tradition of conservative Baptists in southwestern Virginia in worship services and congregational meetings were recorded in rural churches, and interviews and songs were collected in congregation members' homes. Supplemental information and transcripts include indices of texts, songs, and informants. Also available is an inventory and comparative summary of tunes collected and the NEH grant application, which includes a narrative about the purpose, significance, and scope of the project.
Folklorist and librarian Brett Sutton was born in 1948 and raised in Champaign-Urbana, Ill. He enrolled in the Curriculum of Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, earning a Masters degree in 1976. His thesis project, The Gospel Hymn, Shaped Notes, and the Black Tradition, focused on African American spiritual folk singing in North Carolina. The collection includes reel-to-reel tapes with cover sheets, tape indices, and content notes for each recording that were gathered for Sutton's thesis research. These tapes were recorded in several locations, including the World's Greatest Church of Our Lord Jesus Christ of the Apostolic Faith in Durham, N.C., an African American congregational church. Recordings consist of Sunday morning services; a benefit to honor the choir's sixth anniversary; shape-note gospel hymns; spirituals; and interviews with Gurtha Dunston, leader of the vocal choir at Gethsemane Baptist Church in Franklin County, N.C. Other tapes contain music and preaching recorded from WSCR radio broadcasts in Durham.

T

Photographic negatives and prints, digital photographs and video, posters, ephemera, publications, memorabilia, and audiovisual materials created and collected by D. Kent Thompson and Sue Meyer Thompson in the course of documenting the independent rock music scene in North Carolina in the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. Also included are approximately 15,000+ digital images taken by D. Kent Thompson that document the "Moral Monday" grassroots movement centered in Raleigh, N.C., from 2013-2016. Moral Mondays protests began in North Carolina in spring 2013 in response to actions by the Republican-led state government.
During the 1940s and 1950s, country music singer and guitarist Glenn Thompson was a popular bandleader, radio personality, and recording artist, performing first with the Burlington, N.C.,-based Blue Ridge Entertainers and subsequently with his own Dixie Playboys. Thompson continued to perform regularly and released several recordings as both soloist and bandleader until his retirement in 1985. The collection includes photographs and sound recordings documenting Thompson's musical career. Photographs feature Thompson, his bandmates, and associates during the 1940s and 1950s, and include several promotional shots of Thompson, the Blue Ridge Entertainers, and the Dixie Playboys. Photographs also document Thompson's involvement with Danville, Va., radio station WDVA and his performance at a number of venues, including the WDVA Barn Dance, the Carolina Theatre (Burlington), a voting rally, a WTOB (Winston-Salem) television show, and several radio stations. Also included are photographs of comedians who performed in Thompson's stage show, most commonly long-time bandmate Sleepy Johnson and WDVA personality Homer T (Thomasson). Other performers include Charlie Monroe; armless musician Ray R. Meyers; and the Louvin Brothers. Sound recordings include CD copies of commercial 78 rpm records and LP records; original 45 rpm records; and cassettes and compact discs issued privately by Thompson or by the Greensboro-based Skatter label. A taped interview, in which Thompson comments on the collection's photographs, provides anecdotes about Buck Owens, Bill Monroe and Charlie Monroe, Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs, the Louvins, Ray Meyers, Thompson's bandmates, and Thompson's musical experiences in Danville and Burlington.
Tommy Thompson (1937-2003) was a founding member of both the Hollow Rock String Band and the Red Clay Ramblers, as well as a playwright, composer, and actor.
Cheryl Thurber is an interdisciplinary scholar, cultural historian, folklorist, and photographer. During the 1970s and 1980s, Thurber traveled with fellow folklorist and music historian David Evans through Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, Texas, Louisiana, and California, documenting African American communities, local musicians, and local musical traditions.
Allen Tullos graduated in 1976 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a Masters degree in folklore; he also earned a Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University. His research interests have centered on American popular culture, the South, cultural geography, biography, and documentary forms.

V

The Dave Van Ronk Collection consists of audio recordings, 1965-1971, created and compiled by Dave Van Ronk, an American folk singer and an important figure in the American folk music revival and the Greenwich Village music scene for more than four decades. The collection includes concert recordings of Van Ronk circa 1967, 1969, and 1971, a WBAI radio show of Dave Van Ronk and Terri Thal, a work tape of his 1967 album Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters, as well as recordings of Ian Buchanan, Tom Paley, and Bob Dylan.
Personal papers of John Vlach, scholar of African American folklife, vernacular architecture, and folk art. The collection consists of correspondence and teaching, research, and publishing files, 1970s-2000s. Acquired as part of the Southern Folklife Collection.

W

The Elijah Wald Collection consists primarily of materials related to publications by American folk blues guitarist and music historian, Elijah Wald. Subjects of Wald's publications include the Narcocorrido folk music of northern Mexico; blues singer and guitarist, Robert Johnson; folk singer, Dave Van Ronk; blues singer, guitarist, and civil rights activist, Josh White; the evolution of popular music; and the various music genres found along the Mississippi River. Of particular note are the audio interviews that Wald conducted for select publications. Notable interviewees include Oscar Brand, Compay Segundo, Barbara Dane, Tom Glazer, Sam Hood, Ali Akbar Khan, Barry Kornfeld, Christine Lavin, Josephine Premice, Pete Seeger, Irwin Silber, Wavy Gravy, Izzy Young, and members of the Josh White family. The collection also contains interviews and transcripts for his writings on roots and world music for the Boston Globe and other publications, master audio recordings of Elijah Wald's commercial recordings, and other materials compiled by Wald, including writings on the 40th anniversary of Arhoolie Records, course materials, and publicity for Wald's music.
Ellen Walters, filmmaker, teacher, and anthropologist of Laurinburg, N.C., has produced and directed several documentary films on southern culture. The collection includes unedited video footage used in the making of The Firehouse Women: Faith, Food and Fellowship (1998) and the final edited copy of the film. The Firehouse Women, funded in part by a folklife documentation grant from the North Carolina Arts Council, features the Gibson, N.C., Firehouse Restaurant and its family of owners--three generations of women restaurateurs. The restaurant is known for its southern-style cooking, a cappella gospel music performed by the owners, and its family atmosphere.
The Skip Weshner Collection consists of audio recordings and papers created and compiled by Skip Weshner, a radio disc jockey and host of The Skip Weshner Show. Weshner's radio show, originally known as Accent on Sound, was based and broadcasted in both New York City (WBAI, WNCN) and Los Angeles (KRHM-FM) from the mid-1950s until the mid-1980s. The collection includes audio recordings, 1958-1984, of Weshner's radio shows as well as miscellanous papers, 1941-1984, related to Weshner and his carreer in radio. Noted guests on the audio recordings include musicians Hoyt Axton, Leon Bibb, Jose Feliciano, Bob Gibson, John Sebastian, Blossom Deary, Gordon Lightfoot, Mickey Newbury, Jerry Jeff Walker, Fred Neil, Randy Newman, John Denver, Ramblin' Jack Elliot, and Joni Mitchell.
Jerry Wexler (1917- ) was born in New York City. He was a partner with Ahmet Ertegun in Atlantic Records, an independent record label specializing in rhythm and blues, a term Wexler coined while a reporter for Billboard Magazine. With Atlantic, Stax, and other labels, Wexler created a greatly influential corpus of classic rhythm and blues, rock and roll, and soul music. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987.
The David E. Whisnant Collection consists of audio recordings and other materials compiled by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Professor Emeritus of English, David E. Whisnant. The recordings comprise of live performances, interviews, and dubbed radio recordings. Artists or interviewees featured on the recordings include the Blue Sky Boys, Bill Bolick, Garland Bolick, the Burke Family Gospel Singers, and Norman Edmonds, among others. Other materials found in the collection include a publicity photograph of D.L. Menard and the Louisiana Aces and student papers from David E. Whisnant's fall 1991 course, The Politics of Country Music, at UNC-Chapel Hill.
The Charles White and David Rhees Collection consists of an open reel recording, 1972, of the college radio program, Mostly Blues. The program was hosted by folklorist, Christopher Kip Lornell, and produced and recorded by Charles White and David Rhees for broadcast on WQFS at Guilford College in Greensboro, N.C. The recording features performances by Peg Leg Sam (1911-1977), born Arthur Jackson, African American harmonica player, singer, comedian, and medicine show entertainer from Jonesville, S.C.; and Elester Anderson (1925-1980), African American blues guitarist and singer from Conetoe, Edgecombe County, N.C., on guitar, harmonica, and voice, with brief interviews.
D.K. (Donald Knight) Wilgus was born on 1 December 1918, in Mansfield, Ohio. He attended the Ohio State University, where he received a Bachelor of Arts in 1941, a Master of Arts in 1947, and a Doctorate of Philosophy in 1954. Wilgus spent most of his career teaching in the Center for the Study of Comparative Folklore and Mythology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Throughout his career he helped pioneer the chronicling of popular musical forms, including Blues and Hillbilly music. In 1986, he married former student and long-time colleague Eleanor R. Long. D.K. Wilgus died on 25 December 1989.
The North American Traditions Collection consists of audio recordings, 1967-2007, and videotapes, 1997, of North American traditional music created and compiled by Mark Wilson. The collection includes Mark Wilson's original field recordings as well as master recordings, sessions, and outtakes related to Rounder Record's North American Traditions Series. Artists featured on the audio recordings include the Balfa Brothers, E.C. (Estil Cortez) Ball (1913-1978), Orna Ball (1907-2000), John Campbell, Winnie Chafe, Paddy Cronin, Tom Doucet, Art Galbraith (1909-1993), Sarah Ogan Gunning (1910-1983), George Hawkins, Roscoe Holcolmb, Jerry Holland (1955-2009), Van Holyoak, Bessie Jones (1902-1984), Theresa and Marie MacLellan, Carl MacKenzie, Joe MacLean, Doug MacPhee, Glenn Ohrlin, Ola Belle Reed (1916-2002), Almeda Riddle, Fields Ward (1911-1987), and Nimrod Workman. The collection also includes video recordings, 1997, featuring Owen Chapman (1919-) and J.P. Fraley II, and scattered tape logs and memos found with select audio recordings.
The James E. Wise Collection consists of field recordings of a Saturday evening church service held at the Rescue Mission Church, a holiness church of the Sons of God denomination, in Lenoir, Caldwell County, N.C. The recordings were made by historian and author, James E. Wise, while he was a graduate student in the Curriculum of Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and correspond to his 1977 thesis, The Sons of God in the North Carolina Mountains: An Exercise in Thick Description. The recordings feature music, testimonies, and sermons by Margaret Parsons, presiding preacher for Rescue Mission Church, Lenoir, N.C.; Bonnie Pennell, gospel soloist and testifier; Ray Townsell, preacher and testifier; and Coy Parsons, guitarist, gospel soloist, and testifier. Also included in the collection are tape logs and transcripts that correspond to the audio recordings found in the collection, as well as ephemera and transcripts that correspond to additional Sons of God field recordings found in the North Carolina Folklore Broadcast Collection.
Old-time musician Stephan Wishnevsky was the author of three books, including How The Hippies Ruin't Hillbilly Music: A Historical Memoir, 1960-2000 (2006).
Stan Woodward is a southern auteur and documentary filmmaker. The Woodward Studio Limited produces documentaries on southern folk culture through the themes of American foodway and related traditions. In the 1980s, Woodward served as director of the Media Arts Center and the Communication Wing at the Capital Children's Museum in Washington, D.C., where he got to know animator Chuck Jones. Woodward also worked as filmmaker-in-residence in Georgia, South Carolina, and other locations where he was involved in mentoring independent filmmakers and advising classroom teachers on how to teach students to create Super 8mm films. In the 1990s, Woodward worked on productions of Satellite Distance Learning Broadcasts for various television networks.

Z

The Craig Zearfoss Collection consists of live video recordings, audio recordings, posters, photographs, and papers affiliated with the Triangle's indie rock music scene from 1988 to 2008. The majority of the collection consists of live video recordings created and compiled by videographer and documentarian, Craig Zearfoss, from 1993 to 2005. The videotapes, which feature live performances and interviews from local and touring musicians, were recorded at various concert venues in the Triangle, including the Brewery in Raleigh, N.C., the Cat's Cradle in Carrboro, N.C., the Cave in Chapel Hill, N.C., the Local 506 in Chapel Hill, N.C., the Duke Coffee House in Durham, N.C., and Pine Hill Farm in Durham, N.C. Notable musicians and bands featured on the live video recordings include, Ben Folds Five, Peter Case, Drive By Truckers, Alice Gerrard, Man or Astro-man?, Tift Merritt, Old 97's, Pipe, Southern Culture on the Skids, Squirrel Nut Zippers, Superchunk, Two Dollar Pistols, and Whiskeytown. Many of the materials found in the collection correspond to Sleazefest, an annual local music festival that Zearfoss documented from 1994 to 2004. These materials consist of live video recordings, papers, photographs, and posters. The collection also contains music videos, 1992-1998, privately released and commercial audio recordings, 1988-2004, as well as broadcast video material, 1994-1999, related to the Triangle based public access shows Live Around Town, Wide Angle, and Radiovision. Also included are posters and papers related to Zearfoss' live video recordings and the Triangle music scene at large, including concert posters and flyers, letters, press clippings, video tape logs, video release forms, and zines.
Religious studies scholar Michael J. Zogry conducted interviews for the Enduring Voices Project through a folklife documentation grant from the North Carolina Arts Council. The collection includes typed transcripts and videotapes of interviews with individual members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in Cherokee, N.C. Interviewees include herbalist Amy Grant Walker, musician Walker Calhoun, storyteller Jerry Wolfe, and woodcarver Amanda Crowe. Topics include recollections of childhood on the Cherokee Indian Reservation and Cherokee songs, dances, stories, crafts, stickball games, and medicine.
The Charles G. Zug III Collection consists of interviews, field notes, and other papers compiled by folklorist and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill professor, Charles G. Zug III. The majority of the collection is made up of audio interviews conducted primarily by Zug with North Carolina-based folk artists, including boatbuilders, chair-makers, painters, potters, sculptors, ship model builders, and weavers, from the counties of Burke, Carteret, Catawba, Davidson, Lincoln, and Surry. Notable interviewees include sculptor, Raymond Coins; potter, Burlon Craig; and painter, Minnie Reinhardt. The collection also contains field notes, or transcripts, created by Zug that correspond to the interviews found in the collection, as well as other papers compiled by Zug, including applications for the North Carolina Folk Heritage Award and printed materials featuring published works by Zug on the folk art and self-taught artists of North Carolina.
The Wilson Library CB #3926, UNC-Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC 27515-8890 Phone: (919) 962-7105 Email: wilsonlibrary@unc.edu